How Do I Type in Times New Roman a Unicode Hexadecimal Letter?



gfross
07-10-2005, 12:04 AM
I'm trying to type a transliteration of Sanskrit devanagari in Word 2003,
using Times New Roman. I know the Unicode hexadecimals for those letters
that have diacritcal marks. However, most of the hexadecimals contain a
Roman letter, e.g., 1E47 for the underdotted n, preventing me from using the
ALT-X shortcut method of typing the transliterated letter (since there is no
E on the numbers keypad).

So my question is as follows: Is there a way I can still use the shorcut
method, or do I have to use, instead, either the copy-and-paste-the-symbol
method or the Autocorrect method?

Stan Brown
07-10-2005, 12:04 AM
On Thu, 23 Jun 2005 17:38:03 -0700, gfross
<gfross@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

> e.g., 1E47 for the underdotted n, preventing me from using the
>ALT-X shortcut method of typing the transliterated letter (since there is no
>E on the numbers keypad).

Have you tried this? The Alt-X works for me and is not dependent on
the numeric keypad (inline Alt-nnnn).

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
"My theory was a perfectly good one. The facts were misleading."
-- /The Lady Vanishes/ (1938)

garfield-n-odie
07-10-2005, 12:04 AM
What happens if you type 1E47 from the regular keyboard, and then
press Alt+X from the regular keyboard?

gfross wrote:

> I'm trying to type a transliteration of Sanskrit devanagari in Word 2003,
> using Times New Roman. I know the Unicode hexadecimals for those letters
> that have diacritcal marks. However, most of the hexadecimals contain a
> Roman letter, e.g., 1E47 for the underdotted n, preventing me from using the
> ALT-X shortcut method of typing the transliterated letter (since there is no
> E on the numbers keypad).
>
> So my question is as follows: Is there a way I can still use the shorcut
> method, or do I have to use, instead, either the copy-and-paste-the-symbol
> method or the Autocorrect method?

Suzanne S. Barnhill
07-10-2005, 12:04 AM
You don't need to use the numeric keypad; just enter the number from the
keyboard and press Alt+X. The numeric keypad is required only for the
Alt+0nnn entry of ASCII codes.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
all may benefit.

"gfross" <gfross@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:551D0E1A-0F14-4E66-A427-EF5E8BA792DC@microsoft.com...
> I'm trying to type a transliteration of Sanskrit devanagari in Word 2003,
> using Times New Roman. I know the Unicode hexadecimals for those letters
> that have diacritcal marks. However, most of the hexadecimals contain a
> Roman letter, e.g., 1E47 for the underdotted n, preventing me from using
the
> ALT-X shortcut method of typing the transliterated letter (since there is
no
> E on the numbers keypad).
>
> So my question is as follows: Is there a way I can still use the shorcut
> method, or do I have to use, instead, either the copy-and-paste-the-symbol
> method or the Autocorrect method?

gfross
07-10-2005, 12:04 AM
I see what the problem is. It occurs only when I type the unicode number
after an a, b, c, d, or e -- one of the five letters used in Unicode
hexadecimal. For example, hasta1E25. The ALT-X command groups "a1E25"
together as a unit, which then produces an empty square. The only way I have
been able to get the program to recognize 1E25 as the correct unit in this
context is to highlight 1E25 and then press ALT-X. This method is very
clumsy, however.

What I've done to solve this problem, however, is to use Autocorrect for the
transliterated Sanskrit letters, e.g., *hu* for an underdotted h, *sa* for an
s with acute accent over it, *am* for an a with a macron over it, etc.

Thanks for all of your replies!

"Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote:

> You don't need to use the numeric keypad; just enter the number from the
> keyboard and press Alt+X. The numeric keypad is required only for the
> Alt+0nnn entry of ASCII codes.
>
> --
> Suzanne S. Barnhill
> Microsoft MVP (Word)
> Words into Type
> Fairhope, Alabama USA
> Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
> Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
> all may benefit.
>
> "gfross" <gfross@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:551D0E1A-0F14-4E66-A427-EF5E8BA792DC@microsoft.com...
> > I'm trying to type a transliteration of Sanskrit devanagari in Word 2003,
> > using Times New Roman. I know the Unicode hexadecimals for those letters
> > that have diacritcal marks. However, most of the hexadecimals contain a
> > Roman letter, e.g., 1E47 for the underdotted n, preventing me from using
> the
> > ALT-X shortcut method of typing the transliterated letter (since there is
> no
> > E on the numbers keypad).
> >
> > So my question is as follows: Is there a way I can still use the shorcut
> > method, or do I have to use, instead, either the copy-and-paste-the-symbol
> > method or the Autocorrect method?
>
>

Suzanne S. Barnhill
07-10-2005, 12:04 AM
Sounds like a good workaround.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
all may benefit.

"gfross" <gfross@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:F996D76D-1156-4187-857A-F12D7203CE02@microsoft.com...
> I see what the problem is. It occurs only when I type the unicode number
> after an a, b, c, d, or e -- one of the five letters used in Unicode
> hexadecimal. For example, hasta1E25. The ALT-X command groups "a1E25"
> together as a unit, which then produces an empty square. The only way I
have
> been able to get the program to recognize 1E25 as the correct unit in this
> context is to highlight 1E25 and then press ALT-X. This method is very
> clumsy, however.
>
> What I've done to solve this problem, however, is to use Autocorrect for
the
> transliterated Sanskrit letters, e.g., *hu* for an underdotted h, *sa* for
an
> s with acute accent over it, *am* for an a with a macron over it, etc.
>
> Thanks for all of your replies!
>
> "Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote:
>
> > You don't need to use the numeric keypad; just enter the number from the
> > keyboard and press Alt+X. The numeric keypad is required only for the
> > Alt+0nnn entry of ASCII codes.
> >
> > --
> > Suzanne S. Barnhill
> > Microsoft MVP (Word)
> > Words into Type
> > Fairhope, Alabama USA
> > Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
> > Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the
newsgroup so
> > all may benefit.
> >
> > "gfross" <gfross@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> > news:551D0E1A-0F14-4E66-A427-EF5E8BA792DC@microsoft.com...
> > > I'm trying to type a transliteration of Sanskrit devanagari in Word
2003,
> > > using Times New Roman. I know the Unicode hexadecimals for those
letters
> > > that have diacritcal marks. However, most of the hexadecimals contain
a
> > > Roman letter, e.g., 1E47 for the underdotted n, preventing me from
using
> > the
> > > ALT-X shortcut method of typing the transliterated letter (since there
is
> > no
> > > E on the numbers keypad).
> > >
> > > So my question is as follows: Is there a way I can still use the
shorcut
> > > method, or do I have to use, instead, either the
copy-and-paste-the-symbol
> > > method or the Autocorrect method?
> >
> >

Klaus Linke
07-10-2005, 12:04 AM
Allegedly, you can also use Alt+<Num+> (Alt and the "+" on the numeric keypad), then type the hex number (likely using the regular keyboard?).
See for example http://www.microsoft.com/globaldev/reference/glossary.mspx under Alt+Numpad.

I have never gotten that to work though (in WinXP)...
Maybe it'll work as advertised in the next consumer version of Windows?

On the Mac, you can use an IME for hexadecimal input (Alt+####), and it's really better than Alt+X because of the problems mentioned (= character follows a number or some letter a-f).

Regards,
Klaus



"Suzanne S. Barnhill" <sbarnhill@mvps.org> schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:eC0P3QgeFHA.260@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Sounds like a good workaround.
>
> --
> Suzanne S. Barnhill
> Microsoft MVP (Word)
> Words into Type
> Fairhope, Alabama USA
> Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
> Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
> all may benefit.
>
> "gfross" <gfross@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:F996D76D-1156-4187-857A-F12D7203CE02@microsoft.com...
>> I see what the problem is. It occurs only when I type the unicode number
>> after an a, b, c, d, or e -- one of the five letters used in Unicode
>> hexadecimal. For example, hasta1E25. The ALT-X command groups "a1E25"
>> together as a unit, which then produces an empty square. The only way I
> have
>> been able to get the program to recognize 1E25 as the correct unit in this
>> context is to highlight 1E25 and then press ALT-X. This method is very
>> clumsy, however.
>>
>> What I've done to solve this problem, however, is to use Autocorrect for
> the
>> transliterated Sanskrit letters, e.g., *hu* for an underdotted h, *sa* for
> an
>> s with acute accent over it, *am* for an a with a macron over it, etc.
>>
>> Thanks for all of your replies!
>>
>> "Suzanne S. Barnhill" wrote:
>>
>> > You don't need to use the numeric keypad; just enter the number from the
>> > keyboard and press Alt+X. The numeric keypad is required only for the
>> > Alt+0nnn entry of ASCII codes.
>> >
>> > --
>> > Suzanne S. Barnhill
>> > Microsoft MVP (Word)
>> > Words into Type
>> > Fairhope, Alabama USA
>> > Word MVP FAQ site: http://word.mvps.org
>> > Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the
> newsgroup so
>> > all may benefit.
>> >
>> > "gfross" <gfross@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> > news:551D0E1A-0F14-4E66-A427-EF5E8BA792DC@microsoft.com...
>> > > I'm trying to type a transliteration of Sanskrit devanagari in Word
> 2003,
>> > > using Times New Roman. I know the Unicode hexadecimals for those
> letters
>> > > that have diacritcal marks. However, most of the hexadecimals contain
> a
>> > > Roman letter, e.g., 1E47 for the underdotted n, preventing me from
> using
>> > the
>> > > ALT-X shortcut method of typing the transliterated letter (since there
> is
>> > no
>> > > E on the numbers keypad).
>> > >
>> > > So my question is as follows: Is there a way I can still use the
> shorcut
>> > > method, or do I have to use, instead, either the
> copy-and-paste-the-symbol
>> > > method or the Autocorrect method?
>> >
>> >
>

Stan Brown
07-10-2005, 12:04 AM
On Sat, 25 Jun 2005 19:01:03 -0700, gfross
<gfross@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

> when I type the unicode number
>after an a, b, c, d, or e -- one of the five letters used in Unicode
>hexadecimal. For example, hasta1E25. The ALT-X command groups "a1E25"
>together as a unit, which then produces an empty square. The only way I have
>been able to get the program to recognize 1E25 as the correct unit in this
>context is to highlight 1E25 and then press ALT-X. This method is very
>clumsy, however.

If you have only a few possibilities, or you know up front all the
characters you'll need, your Autocorrect technique is good.

If you have unanticipated Unicode characters, you can always press
the space bar before pressing the four digits and then Alt-X. Then
left arrow (not backspace) once, backspace once to get rid of the
space, right arrow once, and continue typing. At least this method
is all on the keyboard.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
"My theory was a perfectly good one. The facts were misleading."
-- /The Lady Vanishes/ (1938)


How Do I Type in Times New Roman a Unicode Hexadecimal Letter?