the best virus ever made



roberto
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?

For example answer could be something like this: I think that the best virus
was.......because it could do....this and this....and made this...and
provoked this...

I hope u find this interesting to discuss

Good Luck

Robert
CUBA

roberto
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
Some expert opinions about why mydoom is the worst virus ever made (if its
the worst maybe it means is the best...??)

http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-1035_11-5179291.html



"roberto" <ralplavner@HotPOP.com> escribió en el mensaje
news:#30mD2#fFHA.2152@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
> answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
> According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?
>
> For example answer could be something like this: I think that the best
virus
> was.......because it could do....this and this....and made this...and
> provoked this...
>
> I hope u find this interesting to discuss
>
> Good Luck
>
> Robert
> CUBA
>
>

Bigbruva
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
If you equate "Best" with "Most Costly" then the winner to date is "MyDoom"
according to MessageLabs and AV-Test.org.
This presentation from F-Secure provides some interesting reading:
http://www.f-secure.com/news/response/f-secure_speed_of_response.pdf

Page 9 has the numbers; MyDoom cost us approximately 4.5 BILLION US Dollars!
:-(

BB

"roberto" <ralplavner@HotPOP.com> wrote in message
news:%2330mD2%23fFHA.2152@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
> answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
> According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?
>
> For example answer could be something like this: I think that the best
> virus
> was.......because it could do....this and this....and made this...and
> provoked this...
>
> I hope u find this interesting to discuss
>
> Good Luck
>
> Robert
> CUBA
>
>

roberto
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
I said the "best" according with it's "programation code" ....according with
its "structure" it's "intelligent ways" to infect, to mutate, to "get"
information from the Pc infected.... For example (hipotethical) the virus
Shyfreak could do the following when it executes: (hipothetical "damages")

1. Turn off your Pc every 60 minutes
2. Take your contacts from your e mail client and send 10 mails per hour to
each contact.
3. Rollback your IE version and every Microsoft product to an older version
4. Desactivate the Add/REmove Programs feature on the control Panel
5. Create a buffer overrun on the Windows Explorer
6 After 10 reboots it could erase all the windows libraries and/or
re-writte the files on the system and system32 folder... so u will need to
reinstall windows.

And it was possible because it "comes" in a mail from some of your contactas
with the following and sugestive subject: " (Your name) read this " and the
atachtment was a txt file but for some reason when u open the atachment it
"mutate" itself to a .exe or to vbs file

The example above is hipothetical 100 % It was just an example to
"ilustrate" what i wanted to say.

So...any idea??

Robert
CUBA


"Bigbruva" <Richardh@dontusethis.ws> escribió en el mensaje
news:uDR0mDFgFHA.3616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> If you equate "Best" with "Most Costly" then the winner to date is
"MyDoom"
> according to MessageLabs and AV-Test.org.
> This presentation from F-Secure provides some interesting reading:
> http://www.f-secure.com/news/response/f-secure_speed_of_response.pdf
>
> Page 9 has the numbers; MyDoom cost us approximately 4.5 BILLION US
Dollars!
> :-(
>
> BB
>
> "roberto" <ralplavner@HotPOP.com> wrote in message
> news:%2330mD2%23fFHA.2152@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
> > answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
> > According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?
> >
> > For example answer could be something like this: I think that the best
> > virus
> > was.......because it could do....this and this....and made this...and
> > provoked this...
> >
> > I hope u find this interesting to discuss
> >
> > Good Luck
> >
> > Robert
> > CUBA
> >
> >
>
>

Leon Mayne [MVP]
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
roberto wrote:
> Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
> answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
> According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?

As far as payloads go, I think CIH was the most interesting, because aside
from viruses that attempted to continuously read the boot sector on the hard
drive until it wore out, CIH was the first to actually pose a permanent
threat to the machine, i.e. corrupt the BIOS and force you to physically
replace the chip.

David H. Lipman
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
From: "Leon Mayne [MVP]" <l.rmv.mayne@uea.ac.uk>

| roberto wrote:
>> Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
>> answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
>> According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?
|
| As far as payloads go, I think CIH was the most interesting, because aside
| from viruses that attempted to continuously read the boot sector on the hard
| drive until it wore out, CIH was the first to actually pose a permanent
| threat to the machine, i.e. corrupt the BIOS and force you to physically
| replace the chip.
|

That's a good point ! The CIH (aka; Chernobyl) and the few that followed suit, were the
first vruses with a truly destructively payload. There has been the argument can a virus
destroy hardware. The answer is no. However, the Chernobyl comes the closest as on the
26th of the month (depending upon variant) will erase the Flashable BIOS if the motherboard
is not set to Read Only. Since there is no BIOS there is no boot process and you can't even
flash the BIOS with a Boot Floppy. Unless the chip is socketed, your only recourse is to
send the motherboard to the vendor for service or get a new motherboard. IF the BIOS is
socketed then you could conceivably just get a replacement chip.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm

roberto
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
Hi Dave... i translate this text (original was in spanish) using the Alta
Vista web site translator. Just adding some profesional opinion about CIH

Name: W95/CIH Information: This virus attacks the Flash BIOS (the part of
the computer that initializes and administers to the relations and the data
flow between the devices of the system, including the rigid disk, ports
series and parallel and the keyboard) of the PC, and after this, must be
fixed the hardware of the same one, since the damage is not only at software
level. Characteristics: 3 versions of this virus to the date, W95.CIH V1.2,
W95.CIH V1.3 (both attack 26 of April, commemorating the Russian nuclear
disaster of Chernobyl) and W95.CIH V1.4 exist (26 of every month). This
infected virus archives ejecutables(.exe) of Windows 95/98/NT, but is only
able to work under both first. When some program is infected, the virus
becomes resident. This means that it is always running in the PC, from the
beginning to its dull one. From its "residence" the infected virus all those
programs that are executed or copied. The archives infected by this virus do
not change of size, since the infected virus spaces lazy in target in these
programs. In addition to this, the two virus has "payload" that is executed
in the dates before mentioned (26 of April or 26 of every month, according
to the version). First it was designed in the beginning to sobrewrite the
hard disk with random data of track zero entering an infinite curl,
producing that the system is hung. Like result of this, the computer will
not be able to return to bootear from the disc or floppy disk. This only
produces damage of data. The second "payload" tries to cause permanent
damage to the system. It corrupts the Flash BIOS producing that once the
system begins, the screen does not show anything. This is irreparable by
software.

"David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> escribió en el mensaje
news:uzLYmLJgFHA.3316@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> From: "Leon Mayne [MVP]" <l.rmv.mayne@uea.ac.uk>
>
> | roberto wrote:
> >> Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
> >> answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
> >> According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?
> |
> | As far as payloads go, I think CIH was the most interesting, because
aside
> | from viruses that attempted to continuously read the boot sector on the
hard
> | drive until it wore out, CIH was the first to actually pose a permanent
> | threat to the machine, i.e. corrupt the BIOS and force you to physically
> | replace the chip.
> |
>
> That's a good point ! The CIH (aka; Chernobyl) and the few that followed
suit, were the
> first vruses with a truly destructively payload. There has been the
argument can a virus
> destroy hardware. The answer is no. However, the Chernobyl comes the
closest as on the
> 26th of the month (depending upon variant) will erase the Flashable BIOS
if the motherboard
> is not set to Read Only. Since there is no BIOS there is no boot process
and you can't even
> flash the BIOS with a Boot Floppy. Unless the chip is socketed, your only
recourse is to
> send the motherboard to the vendor for service or get a new motherboard.
IF the BIOS is
> socketed then you could conceivably just get a replacement chip.
>
> --
> Dave
> http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
> http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
>
>

roberto
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
Another information about CIH. Reading this article it reminds me the movie
Catch me if U can. People like this.... this is terrorism!!! Chen and the
others like him should be forced to work for honest purposes and if refuse
face a pain for 30 years in prisson, or maybe terapy with electroshocks in
order to erase from their memories their freaking knowledges. Justice around
the world must be strong ennough with this criminal acts. I heard about a
case...some person in EE.UU kill himself after he lost some valious
information he has on his Computer. He jumped from a building. It was a
"forced suicide" .... So, my point is that those virus authors should face
pain more severe than 3 years or 15 000 usd.
****************************************************************************
*******
This dangerous virus has been called by several names, such as "CIH",
"NetworkNuke" and "Chernobyl".

Virus W32.CIH, detected itself in Taiwan at the beginning of June of 1998
and after one week or was expanded anywhere in the world, according to the
version of the same one, day 26 of April, or days26 can be activated of
every month (that is that can be had the virus without direct consequences,
more than I infect, until that date). The virus infects the EXE files of 32
bits of Windows®95/98 and will infect all the archives of this type that
finds. If an infected file is executed, the virus will be left resident in
the memory and will infect the archives that are copied or opened.

The infected archives will be of the same size that the original ones, due
to the special techniques that this virus uses, which makes the detection
more difficult of the same one. This virus looks for empty spaces within the
file and it is them filling with his own viral code, in small segments. In
any case the virus has some bugs that do that they can block the PC when
infected archives are executed.

All the variants of this virus erase the first 2048 sectors of the hard
disk, essentially, and soon formateando it, in addition it tries to rewrite
the BIOS of the computer, leaving it unusable until the change of BIOS or
plate mother. This last one so only happens with plates mothers who have a
BIOS on-escribible (Flash-Bios).

The virus has two consequences in the date of activation: First it is that
flock or on-it writes the called information of the hard disk using of
direct writing, skipping the protections antivirus of BIOS, on-writing also
MBR (MASTER BOOT RECORD) and the sector of the BOOT.

These are their basic characteristics:

a.. The CIH is programmed to activate the 26 of April (anniversary of the
accident in Chernobyl).
b.. Some variants of this virus will activate the 26 of June and version
1,4 will do day 26 of any month.
c.. This virus infects the EXE files of Windows®95/98 (archives EXE)
d.. Its viral code Integra like part of file EXE taking care a space
nonused for this way avoiding its detection.
e.. It works under the modality of "firing", that allows him not to
demonstrate itself until it activates in the indicated date.
f.. Virus CIH destroys archives in the hard disk and the memory of the
BIOS in computers that count on a Flash BIOS with capacity to be updateable
and that that is formed like write-enabled.
Chen Ing-Hou, the creator of the virus CIH, that takes its initials,
shows its ample smile in the Criminal Investigation Bureau in Taipei,
Taiwan. It shows that it feels much by the desbastante of his viral
creation, but it was motivated by a revenge against which it called
"incompetent developers of software antivirus".
"he is not a criminal here, whereas a formal denunciation does not
exist", a spokesman of the police said and "everything what we know about
the virus is by the originating news of the foreigner." Chen later was
accused to be suspicious to have scattered in Internet a computer virus and
to prove to it him the positions it could face a pain of 3 years of prison,
in addition to damages and damages reaclamados by possible victims.

By those reasons, Chen immediately was set free.


When Chen created the virus was a student of Engineering of Computation in
the Technological Institute of Taipé and later to graduate, Obligatory
Military it is serve in his country.




"David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> escribió en el mensaje
news:uzLYmLJgFHA.3316@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> From: "Leon Mayne [MVP]" <l.rmv.mayne@uea.ac.uk>
>
> | roberto wrote:
> >> Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
> >> answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
> >> According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?
> |
> | As far as payloads go, I think CIH was the most interesting, because
aside
> | from viruses that attempted to continuously read the boot sector on the
hard
> | drive until it wore out, CIH was the first to actually pose a permanent
> | threat to the machine, i.e. corrupt the BIOS and force you to physically
> | replace the chip.
> |
>
> That's a good point ! The CIH (aka; Chernobyl) and the few that followed
suit, were the
> first vruses with a truly destructively payload. There has been the
argument can a virus
> destroy hardware. The answer is no. However, the Chernobyl comes the
closest as on the
> 26th of the month (depending upon variant) will erase the Flashable BIOS
if the motherboard
> is not set to Read Only. Since there is no BIOS there is no boot process
and you can't even
> flash the BIOS with a Boot Floppy. Unless the chip is socketed, your only
recourse is to
> send the motherboard to the vendor for service or get a new motherboard.
IF the BIOS is
> socketed then you could conceivably just get a replacement chip.
>
> --
> Dave
> http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
> http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
>
>

Galen
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
In news:%2330mD2%23fFHA.2152@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl,
roberto <ralplavner@HotPOP.com> had this to say:

My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

> Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
> answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
> According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?
>
> For example answer could be something like this: I think that the
> best virus was.......because it could do....this and this....and made
> this...and provoked this...
>
> I hope u find this interesting to discuss
>
> Good Luck
>
> Robert
> CUBA

Do not take this seriously.... Really... I wouldn't lie about THAT part. <g>

I've thought about this. I've actually thought long and hard about it. It
was, err, 1978 or 1979 or even 1980 when I got my first "PC." It was NOT the
PET so it should have been 80 but I think, I'd almost swear, it was '79 and
was the VIC 20. Not long after I moved to an Amiga system but moved back to
the VIC when a cradle modem was released and at that time picked up a tape
(now similar to a DAT in theory) backup system. Considering the price of the
5 mile long floppy and the giant cartridges it was not a cheap time in my
life and I was but a kid.

Anyhow, it wasn't until 1988 or so when I discovered that I had written a
virus. It's the keyboard gremlin virus. It seems that I can be typing along
and sure enough extra letters will appear or be deleted. Some of the time
there will be whole words that appear that I know I didn't type. I couldn't
have. I wouldn't say such absurd things. <g> So they couldn't have come from
me, they must have been the keyboard gremlin.

Needless to say this virus has spread and no amount of AV software can
prevent you from contracting it. Any communication with me results in, after
a short time, the other party contracting this virus. I can cite thousands
of people whom I've chatted to who've made typographical errors. My only
theory is that there's some sort of gamma ray carried from the monitor (not
even TFT or LCD monitors are excluded so this theory may well be in error)
that enables the contraction/propagation of this virus. At first I thought
it was based on packets but I eventually found people who were contracting
this virus simply by talking to me about a subject as benign as hardware.
Then, lo and behold, they found that people they communicated with have also
contracted this virus. My guess is, assuming the nature of the math, that
98% of the internet is infected and some 80% of the computer users are also
infected with the Computer Gremlin virus. They will, sobriety has no measure
on this, sit and type and seemingly strange text will appear on the screen
and often will appear in the brief seconds before you finish typing and the
enter key is pressed to send the message.

So far the only solution that anyone has found that's worked has been to
leave small bits of crumbs around the keyboard while holding a black light
in one hand and a butterfly net in the other. Keyboard Gremlins show up in
certain lighting. This worked in the early 1990s and up until the release of
AOL to the masses. (Some theories claim that AOL is actually a
product/mutation of the original virus though this can't be proven at this
time. Continued posting to Usenet with typographical errors has shown that
there may be some merit to this theory though no government has come forth
with the funding for such a study at this time.)

One can only say that the Keyboard Gremlin began with (and no I'm not proud)
my inability to pass 9th grade keyboarding (oddly NOW they call it typing or
so they tell me, they don't let me go back and take it again some 14 years
later) and my own home usage of the internet. While I'm probably not the
father of this virus I can certainly feel sorry for the amount of time I've
spent spreading it. Just by reading this I can almost guarantee that you too
have now contracted it. A simple test would be to chat in any public chat
room and to measure your typing ability after an hour and to then measure
the WPM vs. typographical errors of the person with whom you are chatting
and you will see that not only do you have the virus but that you're
spreading it as well. As it's increased exponentially I can only assume that
my early start in this (and the creation was not intentional so even if I am
the father I'm not willingly the father and instead blame it on Zork® and
hope that they authors of the game are truly sorry. Then again, it might
have been Flog® or even Jacks or Better® which originated it? I have no idea
but it could have been me. Either way you have it now and your only options
now are to simply accept and to warn your fellow human that you're infected.

Okay... The best? No such thing... They're all evil... The "best" implies
good and to be honest there's no such critter in my opinion. However the
"best" were those which didn't actually DO anything but convince people they
were infected so that they'd delete a file they didn't really want to delete
as they suspected it was a virus. Of course not too many people had heard of
search engines then...

Galen
--

"But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world
without them."

Sherlock Holmes

Phil Weldon
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
'roberto' wrote, in part:
| According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?

_____

I'd nominate one of the 'seaker-net' viruses (a boot sector virus spread via
floppies as a 'boot sector' virus.)

These viruses were very presistent, especially in academic environments.
Anti-virus protection was almost non-existent, and data/programs were passed
around on floppies. The coding wasn't elaborate (and couldn't be very
large), but some were elegant, and likely hit a larger percentage of then
existing desktops than any virus in the current 'top ten.'

It would be nice if someone dug up some facts on early viruses. I nominate
you. And please post your results here.

Phi Weldon


"roberto" <ralplavner@HotPOP.com> wrote in message
news:%2330mD2%23fFHA.2152@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
> answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
> According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?
>
> For example answer could be something like this: I think that the best
> virus
> was.......because it could do....this and this....and made this...and
> provoked this...
>
> I hope u find this interesting to discuss
>
> Good Luck
>
> Robert
> CUBA
>
>

oldguy
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
Hey Roberto,

My favorite for the contemporary virus award is the message trail with the subject "noise as a snore in memory when computer is in idle" in this forum.

In line with the general description of a virus, this trail clearly shows that this virus has slowed many innocent responders to a nervous stop, using precise resources, preventing legitimate others from receiving the assistance they need and deserve. To be fair, there is no apparent indication of any files being infected, or any disks being formatted, but nevertheless it has created a great havoc for the participators, not to mention the stress of being subjected to the naive and megalomaniac ravings of a brat.

Best regards,
Engin


"roberto" <ralplavner@HotPOP.com> wrote in message news:%2330mD2%23fFHA.2152@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
> answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
> According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?
>
> For example answer could be something like this: I think that the best virus
> was.......because it could do....this and this....and made this...and
> provoked this...
>
> I hope u find this interesting to discuss
>
> Good Luck
>
> Robert
> CUBA
>
>

Zvi Netiv
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
"David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote:

> From: "Leon Mayne [MVP]" <l.rmv.mayne@uea.ac.uk>
>
> | roberto wrote:
> >> Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
> >> answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
> >> According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?
> |
> | As far as payloads go, I think CIH was the most interesting, because aside
> | from viruses that attempted to continuously read the boot sector on the hard
> | drive until it wore out,

CIH had no such routine in its payload. What it does is: On April 26, the
payload will trash the 2,048 first sectors of the hard drive, by overwriting
with trash data from memory.

> CIH was the first to actually pose a permanent
> | threat to the machine, i.e. corrupt the BIOS and force you to physically
> | replace the chip.

Or the motherboard, if the flash BIOS is surface mounted.

> That's a good point ! The CIH (aka; Chernobyl) and the few that followed suit, were the
> first vruses with a truly destructively payload.

The first virus that had a deliberately destructive payload was Michelangelo, a
boot/MBR infector that triggered the first time on March 6, 1992. There have
been quite many viruses with a deliberately destructive payload, since.

Regards, Zvi
--
NetZ Computing Ltd. ISRAEL www.invircible.com www.ivi.co.il (Hebrew)
InVircible Virus Defense Solutions, ResQ and Data Recovery Utilities

David H. Lipman
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
From: "Zvi Netiv" <support@replace_with_domain.com>


|
| The first virus that had a deliberately destructive payload was Michelangelo, a
| boot/MBR infector that triggered the first time on March 6, 1992. There have
| been quite many viruses with a deliberately destructive payload, since.
|
| Regards, Zvi
| --
| NetZ Computing Ltd. ISRAEL www.invircible.com www.ivi.co.il (Hebrew)
| InVircible Virus Defense Solutions, ResQ and Data Recovery Utilities

My context is hardware not data.
And that fell off the radar scope by oversnipping the following...
"There has been the argument can a virus destroy hardware. The answer is no. However, the
Chernobyl comes the closest as on the 26th of the month (depending upon variant) will erase
the Flashable BIOS if the motherboard
is not set to Read Only."

And Leon Mayne wrote "...that attempted to continuously read the boot sector on the hard
drive until it wore out". No me.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm

Leon Mayne [MVP]
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
Zvi Netiv wrote:
>>> As far as payloads go, I think CIH was the most interesting,
>>> because aside from viruses that attempted to continuously read the
>>> boot sector on the hard drive until it wore out,
>
> CIH had no such routine in its payload.

I never said it did. I was saying that the closest any virus had come before
to causing physical damage was the above mentioned technique of attempting
to wear out the boot sector.

> What it does is: On April
> 26, the payload will trash the 2,048 first sectors of the hard drive,
> by overwriting with trash data from memory.

As well as attempting to flash the BIOS and render it unusable.

> The first virus that had a deliberately destructive payload was
> Michelangelo, a boot/MBR infector that triggered the first time on
> March 6, 1992. There have been quite many viruses with a
> deliberately destructive payload, since.

Again, you misunderstood. I was not talking about a destructive payload in
general, I was talking about physical / permanent damage. Just deleting some
system files or corrupting the OS so you have to reinstall is not physical /
permanent damage.

Bigbruva
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
nnice e

Oh NOooo!!!

:-)


"Galen" <galennews@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:%23CjzHLSgFHA.3616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> In news:%2330mD2%23fFHA.2152@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl,
> roberto <ralplavner@HotPOP.com> had this to say:
>
> My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:
>
>> Another "conflictive and interesting" question....maybe worst to
>> answer....but i would like to discuss and change opinions about this.
>> According YOUR opinions which was the best virus ever made?
>>
>> For example answer could be something like this: I think that the
>> best virus was.......because it could do....this and this....and made
>> this...and provoked this...
>>
>> I hope u find this interesting to discuss
>>
>> Good Luck
>>
>> Robert
>> CUBA
>
> Do not take this seriously.... Really... I wouldn't lie about THAT part.
> <g>
>
> I've thought about this. I've actually thought long and hard about it. It
> was, err, 1978 or 1979 or even 1980 when I got my first "PC." It was NOT
> the PET so it should have been 80 but I think, I'd almost swear, it was
> '79 and was the VIC 20. Not long after I moved to an Amiga system but
> moved back to the VIC when a cradle modem was released and at that time
> picked up a tape (now similar to a DAT in theory) backup system.
> Considering the price of the 5 mile long floppy and the giant cartridges
> it was not a cheap time in my life and I was but a kid.
>
> Anyhow, it wasn't until 1988 or so when I discovered that I had written a
> virus. It's the keyboard gremlin virus. It seems that I can be typing
> along and sure enough extra letters will appear or be deleted. Some of the
> time there will be whole words that appear that I know I didn't type. I
> couldn't have. I wouldn't say such absurd things. <g> So they couldn't
> have come from me, they must have been the keyboard gremlin.
>
> Needless to say this virus has spread and no amount of AV software can
> prevent you from contracting it. Any communication with me results in,
> after a short time, the other party contracting this virus. I can cite
> thousands of people whom I've chatted to who've made typographical errors.
> My only theory is that there's some sort of gamma ray carried from the
> monitor (not even TFT or LCD monitors are excluded so this theory may well
> be in error) that enables the contraction/propagation of this virus. At
> first I thought it was based on packets but I eventually found people who
> were contracting this virus simply by talking to me about a subject as
> benign as hardware. Then, lo and behold, they found that people they
> communicated with have also contracted this virus. My guess is, assuming
> the nature of the math, that 98% of the internet is infected and some 80%
> of the computer users are also infected with the Computer Gremlin virus.
> They will, sobriety has no measure on this, sit and type and seemingly
> strange text will appear on the screen and often will appear in the brief
> seconds before you finish typing and the enter key is pressed to send the
> message.
>
> So far the only solution that anyone has found that's worked has been to
> leave small bits of crumbs around the keyboard while holding a black light
> in one hand and a butterfly net in the other. Keyboard Gremlins show up in
> certain lighting. This worked in the early 1990s and up until the release
> of AOL to the masses. (Some theories claim that AOL is actually a
> product/mutation of the original virus though this can't be proven at this
> time. Continued posting to Usenet with typographical errors has shown that
> there may be some merit to this theory though no government has come forth
> with the funding for such a study at this time.)
>
> One can only say that the Keyboard Gremlin began with (and no I'm not
> proud) my inability to pass 9th grade keyboarding (oddly NOW they call it
> typing or so they tell me, they don't let me go back and take it again
> some 14 years later) and my own home usage of the internet. While I'm
> probably not the father of this virus I can certainly feel sorry for the
> amount of time I've spent spreading it. Just by reading this I can almost
> guarantee that you too have now contracted it. A simple test would be to
> chat in any public chat room and to measure your typing ability after an
> hour and to then measure the WPM vs. typographical errors of the person
> with whom you are chatting and you will see that not only do you have the
> virus but that you're spreading it as well. As it's increased
> exponentially I can only assume that my early start in this (and the
> creation was not intentional so even if I am the father I'm not willingly
> the father and instead blame it on Zork® and hope that they authors of the
> game are truly sorry. Then again, it might have been Flog® or even Jacks
> or Better® which originated it? I have no idea but it could have been me.
> Either way you have it now and your only options now are to simply accept
> and to warn your fellow human that you're infected.
>
> Okay... The best? No such thing... They're all evil... The "best" implies
> good and to be honest there's no such critter in my opinion. However the
> "best" were those which didn't actually DO anything but convince people
> they were infected so that they'd delete a file they didn't really want to
> delete as they suspected it was a virus. Of course not too many people had
> heard of search engines then...
>
> Galen
> --
>
> "But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world
> without them."
>
> Sherlock Holmes
>

Galen
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
In news:Ofg$UCcgFHA.3164@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
Bigbruva <Richardh@dontusethis.ws> had this to say:

My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

> nnice e
>
> Oh NOooo!!!
>
> :-)
>

Well, see? Now you've gone and done it. Now you'll surely be propogating the
Keyboard Gremlin Virus to all those you come in contact with. Your only hope
now is to warn people you come in contact with and to use a speel cheker.
<g>

Galen
--

"But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world
without them."

Sherlock Holmes

Zvi Netiv
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
"David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote:
> From: "Zvi Netiv" <support@replace_with_domain.com>

> | The first virus that had a deliberately destructive payload was Michelangelo, a
> | boot/MBR infector that triggered the first time on March 6, 1992. There have
> | been quite many viruses with a deliberately destructive payload, since.

> My context is hardware not data.
> And that fell off the radar scope by oversnipping the following...

The problem is with the non-standard quote mark that you use. As your
assertion, and Leon's nonsense, showed with the same quote marks, I assumed that
both statements were from the same person.

> "There has been the argument can a virus destroy hardware. The answer is no. However, the
> Chernobyl comes the closest as on the 26th of the month (depending upon variant) will erase
> the Flashable BIOS if the motherboard is not set to Read Only."

Which I agree to.

> And Leon Mayne wrote "...that attempted to continuously read the boot sector on the hard
> drive until it wore out".

And this is plain nonsense.

> No me.

Regards
--
NetZ Computing Ltd. ISRAEL www.invircible.com www.ivi.co.il (Hebrew)
InVircible Virus Defense Solutions, ResQ and Data Recovery Utilities

Zvi Netiv
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
"Leon Mayne [MVP]" <l.rmv.mayne@uea.ac.uk> wrote:

> Zvi Netiv wrote:
> >>> As far as payloads go, I think CIH was the most interesting,
> >>> because aside from viruses that attempted to continuously read the
> >>> boot sector on the hard drive until it wore out,
> >
> > CIH had no such routine in its payload.
>
> I never said it did. I was saying that the closest any virus had come before
> to causing physical damage was the above mentioned technique of attempting
> to wear out the boot sector.
>
> > What it does is: On April
> > 26, the payload will trash the 2,048 first sectors of the hard drive,
> > by overwriting with trash data from memory.
>
> As well as attempting to flash the BIOS and render it unusable.
>
> > The first virus that had a deliberately destructive payload was
> > Michelangelo, a boot/MBR infector that triggered the first time on
> > March 6, 1992. There have been quite many viruses with a
> > deliberately destructive payload, since.
>
> Again, you misunderstood. I was not talking about a destructive payload in
> general, I was talking about physical / permanent damage. Just deleting some
> system files or corrupting the OS so you have to reinstall is not physical /
> permanent damage.

What I objected to is "attempted to continuously read the boot sector on the
hard drive until it wore out". Who wrote that nonsense?

Regards, Zvi
--
NetZ Computing Ltd. ISRAEL www.invircible.com www.ivi.co.il (Hebrew)
InVircible Virus Defense Solutions, ResQ and Data Recovery Utilities

Leon Mayne [MVP]
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
Zvi Netiv wrote:
> What I objected to is "attempted to continuously read the boot sector
> on the hard drive until it wore out". Who wrote that nonsense?

OK, I remember reading somewhere (before CIH) that 'it was not possible for
a virus to cause physical / permanent damage to a computer, except perhaps
for a routine that would continuously attempt to read the boot sector until
it caused physical damage'. This was in a book I read in the early days of
viruses, and the book was specifically about virus production. I never
insinuated that CIH performed this action, but it was the only reference to
a routine I had found before BIOS flashing that would allow a piece of
software to cause permanent damage to hardware.

Apologies if I severely offended you.

Zvi Netiv
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
"Leon Mayne [MVP]" <l.rmv.mayne@uea.ac.uk> wrote:
> Zvi Netiv wrote:

> > What I objected to is "attempted to continuously read the boot sector
> > on the hard drive until it wore out". Who wrote that nonsense?
>
> OK, I remember reading somewhere (before CIH) that 'it was not possible for
> a virus to cause physical / permanent damage to a computer, except perhaps
> for a routine that would continuously attempt to read the boot sector until
> it caused physical damage'. This was in a book I read in the early days of
> viruses, and the book was specifically about virus production. I never
> insinuated that CIH performed this action, but it was the only reference to
> a routine I had found before BIOS flashing that would allow a piece of
> software to cause permanent damage to hardware.

You seem to *still* not understand the absurdity of even mention that nonsense.

> Apologies if I severely offended you.

No offense taken, whatsoever. My comment was aimed to the uninformed readers
that tend to accept "authoritative" assertions like yours (MVP) as a fact.
http://www.vmyths.com/fas/fas1.cfm

Noblesse oblige!

Regards, Zvi
--
NetZ Computing Ltd. ISRAEL www.invircible.com www.ivi.co.il (Hebrew)
InVircible Virus Defense Solutions, ResQ and Data Recovery Utilities

Leon Mayne [MVP]
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
Zvi Netiv wrote:
> You seem to *still* not understand the absurdity of even mention that
> nonsense.

I agree, it is completely far-fetched and in *practice* extremely
implausible. My point was that in *theory* it was the only conceivable way
for a piece of software to permanently damage a piece of hardware, no matter
how obscure. I'm not going to carry on arguing my point here. If you can't
understand my point from my previous messages then I suggest you
continuously read over them repeatedly until you either understand or your
brain wears out. Either suits me.


the best virus ever made