Getting an error message nearly every time!



Doug Mc
07-09-2005, 10:19 PM
In the last few days, just about anytime I click on a URL or do a Google
search and click on one of the options I get an error.
The error says that IE has encountered an error and I might lose something
I've been working on. It then asks if I want to send an error report to MS
and restart IE.

Does anyone know what might cause this??

DGuess
07-09-2005, 10:19 PM
"Doug Mc" <NOSPAMdougandnancymcneill@chilitech.com> wrote in message
news:%23Uwk820VFHA.1044@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> In the last few days, just about anytime I click on a URL or do a Google
> search and click on one of the options I get an error.
> The error says that IE has encountered an error and I might lose something
> I've been working on. It then asks if I want to send an error report to
> MS
> and restart IE.
>
> Does anyone know what might cause this??
>
>
>


Spyware and possibly a corrupt cache but I'd bet on the spyware first.

Have you happened to scan the computer with Adaware, spybot and possibly the
Microsoft Anti-spyware program with up to date definitions installed?

Doug Mc
07-09-2005, 10:19 PM
No, I haven't. I'll give that a try.
Thanks,
Doug


"DGuess" <majik@mindspring.oops> wrote in message
news:uEujXW1VFHA.548@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> "Doug Mc" <NOSPAMdougandnancymcneill@chilitech.com> wrote in message
> news:%23Uwk820VFHA.1044@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > In the last few days, just about anytime I click on a URL or do a Google
> > search and click on one of the options I get an error.
> > The error says that IE has encountered an error and I might lose
something
> > I've been working on. It then asks if I want to send an error report to
> > MS
> > and restart IE.
> >
> > Does anyone know what might cause this??
> >
> >
> >
>
>
> Spyware and possibly a corrupt cache but I'd bet on the spyware first.
>
> Have you happened to scan the computer with Adaware, spybot and possibly
the
> Microsoft Anti-spyware program with up to date definitions installed?
>
>
>

David Kelsey
07-09-2005, 10:20 PM
Spyware tends to be blamed for pretty well everything that goes wrong with
computers, but does anyone know what the actual mechanism is that might
cause a machine to go wrong? It can't really be in the interests of a
spyware writer to stop computers working, can it? So are they just
incompetent programmers, or is there another less obvious agenda?

David Kelsey


"DGuess" <majik@mindspring.oops> wrote in message
news:uEujXW1VFHA.548@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> "Doug Mc" <NOSPAMdougandnancymcneill@chilitech.com> wrote in message
> news:%23Uwk820VFHA.1044@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> In the last few days, just about anytime I click on a URL or do a Google
>> search and click on one of the options I get an error.
>> The error says that IE has encountered an error and I might lose
>> something
>> I've been working on. It then asks if I want to send an error report to
>> MS
>> and restart IE.
>>
>> Does anyone know what might cause this??
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> Spyware and possibly a corrupt cache but I'd bet on the spyware first.
>
> Have you happened to scan the computer with Adaware, spybot and possibly
> the Microsoft Anti-spyware program with up to date definitions installed?
>
>
>

Doug Mc
07-09-2005, 10:20 PM
Thanks DGuess.
I downloaded SpyBot and ran it.
So Far, so good!
Thanks for your help!


"DGuess" <majik@mindspring.oops> wrote in message
news:uEujXW1VFHA.548@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> "Doug Mc" <NOSPAMdougandnancymcneill@chilitech.com> wrote in message
> news:%23Uwk820VFHA.1044@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > In the last few days, just about anytime I click on a URL or do a Google
> > search and click on one of the options I get an error.
> > The error says that IE has encountered an error and I might lose
something
> > I've been working on. It then asks if I want to send an error report to
> > MS
> > and restart IE.
> >
> > Does anyone know what might cause this??
> >
> >
> >
>
>
> Spyware and possibly a corrupt cache but I'd bet on the spyware first.
>
> Have you happened to scan the computer with Adaware, spybot and possibly
the
> Microsoft Anti-spyware program with up to date definitions installed?
>
>
>

DGuess
07-09-2005, 10:20 PM
"David Kelsey" <davidkelseyNO@SPAMmetronet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:%23V9mwW%23VFHA.2660@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Spyware tends to be blamed for pretty well everything that goes wrong with
> computers, but does anyone know what the actual mechanism is that might
> cause a machine to go wrong? It can't really be in the interests of a
> spyware writer to stop computers working, can it? So are they just
> incompetent programmers, or is there another less obvious agenda?
>


It's because these spyware writers don't write good code. They want it out
fast and then have plausible deniability if something isn't right. How many
times have we heard of companies saying it couldn't be their code thats
messing it up and when it's uninstalled things seem to work right again.
Windows, IE and OE get blamed for a lot of things in which they aren't the
root cause. How many times have you heard people talk about ActiveX like it
was the worse thing in the world? ActiveX like Java both prompt for running
unless you have it set to run without asking and that's a fairly stupid
thing to do to begin with.

If a publisher can't be verified, it should be a given to not install
whatever they are hawking.

The programmers don't care as long as they can find a hook to get it
installed, be it on top of something else or just straight out.

And thinking that Firefox or other browsers are safer is fairly lame as
well. You can still install a Java app and find out it's affected the
machine in other ways.

You can also install that "just gotta have" screen saver or other freebie
and find you've just infected your computer with junkware that really won't
uninstall. They don't care is the bottom line. Anything that tries to
install something else should be a warning sign that something is up. Yes,
some legitimate apps need to install other things, such as DirectX or .NET
to work but things like these are fairly easy to find that they are in the
"good to install" category.

Most users are fairly inexperienced around computers and the way they work.
It's easy to get this crapware by them. No matter how much I or someone else
may warn them, they still get the crap on there. They see something and
think it's okay to click on it and then you have some code that no means yes
and yes means no (and sometimes it doesn't matter which you click).

Then you have the software that is supposed to stop all this stuff and it's
just as bad as the malware it's supposed to remove.

Getting a user educated is not easy, they don't want to take the time to
have to think about something else other than what they think they want to
do.

And yes, I have told people in the past to box the computer up and send it
back as they were too stupid to own one. While it's been few and far
between, I can only take so much of someone who can't remember how to copy
or paste or where the START button is only so many times.

Keep up to date Antivirus software and it's definitions, an anti-spyware and
it's definitions, a HOSTS file which will redirect some ads to the local
machine where it can't be found are some things everyone should do. The "up
to date" part is the most neded once something is installed. I know a guy
here locally that swears he has an antivirus program and can't possibly be
infected. He's also still in the mood of Windows 95 is a fad and DOS RuLeZ!.
Dr. Watson is the AV and there hasn't been definitions for it in ages but
yet he maintains his computer isn't infected with anything. I can't recall
how many times I've heard him say he had to rebuild his hard drive because
it wouldn't boot suddenly. Couldn't possibly be a boot virus of some type on
there....

I could go on and on about this but it doesn't do any good. People install
things reguardless of the warnings they don't understand.

David Kelsey
07-09-2005, 10:20 PM
What you say makes very good sense to me. On the other hand, some of the
top software houses, including Microsoft itself, supply updates which are
unverified, and the instruction usually given is to 'install anyway'. It
seems that verification takes so long, the next update will be due before
the last one gets verified.

I do regular spyware scans with Ad-Aware and Spybot, the first of which
normally gives me 48 objects, which I delete, while if I then run Spybot, I
get nothing except congratulations on having a clean machine. I currently
have 5144 cookies, but if I delete them, I will have to remember 87 login,
password, secret word, favourite date things, and the place they are
required, which will tax my tired old brain beyond its powers. I do keep
them written down, of course, and I shall kick myself if I get burgled, but
the chances of that, and of the burglar knowing what to do with my passwords
if he finds them, are pretty small. I think it is time the Internet grew
up, and stopped playing James Bond with every petty site demanding
registration and passwords etc. before it will let you in to buy something
from them, or contribute to a forum. I have managed for most of my 75 years
without needing any of that stuff, perhaps because prior to the Net,
businesses were not generally run by 18-year old school-leavers. I mean,
why do I need a password and login to look at my telephone bill? I don't
care if the whole world knows it was 12.50.

As you imply, you can't really have a rewarding experience, to coin a
phrase, if you exclude Java and ActiveX. It might help if website designers
stopped going for the bells and whistles that most people don't give a toss
about, and flung out the Macromedia stuff and Flash, and just settled for a
plain and simple site that opened quickly, navigated faultlessly, and gave
you the opportunity to go elsewhere if you really have to have the fancy
stuff. Everyone wants to be an art director.

They don't call me Victor Meldrew for nothing!

David


"DGuess" <majik@mindspring.oops> wrote in message
news:ulRtiMAWFHA.132@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> "David Kelsey" <davidkelseyNO@SPAMmetronet.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:%23V9mwW%23VFHA.2660@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Spyware tends to be blamed for pretty well everything that goes wrong
>> with computers, but does anyone know what the actual mechanism is that
>> might cause a machine to go wrong? It can't really be in the interests
>> of a spyware writer to stop computers working, can it? So are they just
>> incompetent programmers, or is there another less obvious agenda?
>>
>
>
> It's because these spyware writers don't write good code. They want it out
> fast and then have plausible deniability if something isn't right. How
> many times have we heard of companies saying it couldn't be their code
> thats messing it up and when it's uninstalled things seem to work right
> again. Windows, IE and OE get blamed for a lot of things in which they
> aren't the root cause. How many times have you heard people talk about
> ActiveX like it was the worse thing in the world? ActiveX like Java both
> prompt for running unless you have it set to run without asking and that's
> a fairly stupid thing to do to begin with.
>
> If a publisher can't be verified, it should be a given to not install
> whatever they are hawking.
>
> The programmers don't care as long as they can find a hook to get it
> installed, be it on top of something else or just straight out.
>
> And thinking that Firefox or other browsers are safer is fairly lame as
> well. You can still install a Java app and find out it's affected the
> machine in other ways.
>
> You can also install that "just gotta have" screen saver or other freebie
> and find you've just infected your computer with junkware that really
> won't uninstall. They don't care is the bottom line. Anything that tries
> to install something else should be a warning sign that something is up.
> Yes, some legitimate apps need to install other things, such as DirectX or
> .NET to work but things like these are fairly easy to find that they are
> in the "good to install" category.
>
> Most users are fairly inexperienced around computers and the way they
> work. It's easy to get this crapware by them. No matter how much I or
> someone else may warn them, they still get the crap on there. They see
> something and think it's okay to click on it and then you have some code
> that no means yes and yes means no (and sometimes it doesn't matter which
> you click).
>
> Then you have the software that is supposed to stop all this stuff and
> it's just as bad as the malware it's supposed to remove.
>
> Getting a user educated is not easy, they don't want to take the time to
> have to think about something else other than what they think they want to
> do.
>
> And yes, I have told people in the past to box the computer up and send it
> back as they were too stupid to own one. While it's been few and far
> between, I can only take so much of someone who can't remember how to copy
> or paste or where the START button is only so many times.
>
> Keep up to date Antivirus software and it's definitions, an anti-spyware
> and it's definitions, a HOSTS file which will redirect some ads to the
> local machine where it can't be found are some things everyone should do.
> The "up to date" part is the most neded once something is installed. I
> know a guy here locally that swears he has an antivirus program and can't
> possibly be infected. He's also still in the mood of Windows 95 is a fad
> and DOS RuLeZ!. Dr. Watson is the AV and there hasn't been definitions for
> it in ages but yet he maintains his computer isn't infected with anything.
> I can't recall how many times I've heard him say he had to rebuild his
> hard drive because it wouldn't boot suddenly. Couldn't possibly be a boot
> virus of some type on there....
>
> I could go on and on about this but it doesn't do any good. People install
> things reguardless of the warnings they don't understand.
>

Doug Mc
07-09-2005, 10:20 PM
Hi David,

I'm back with my problem. I thought Spybot had it fixed but it seem that
I'm still getting the error message each time I do something with Internet
Explorer, so I expect it may be something else.

Do you OR ANYONE OUT THERE have any other ideas??

Thanks much,
Doug



"David Kelsey" <davidkelseyNO@SPAMmetronet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:eBD9VuHWFHA.3044@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> What you say makes very good sense to me. On the other hand, some of the
> top software houses, including Microsoft itself, supply updates which are
> unverified, and the instruction usually given is to 'install anyway'. It
> seems that verification takes so long, the next update will be due before
> the last one gets verified.
>
> I do regular spyware scans with Ad-Aware and Spybot, the first of which
> normally gives me 48 objects, which I delete, while if I then run Spybot,
I
> get nothing except congratulations on having a clean machine. I currently
> have 5144 cookies, but if I delete them, I will have to remember 87 login,
> password, secret word, favourite date things, and the place they are
> required, which will tax my tired old brain beyond its powers. I do keep
> them written down, of course, and I shall kick myself if I get burgled,
but
> the chances of that, and of the burglar knowing what to do with my
passwords
> if he finds them, are pretty small. I think it is time the Internet grew
> up, and stopped playing James Bond with every petty site demanding
> registration and passwords etc. before it will let you in to buy something
> from them, or contribute to a forum. I have managed for most of my 75
years
> without needing any of that stuff, perhaps because prior to the Net,
> businesses were not generally run by 18-year old school-leavers. I mean,
> why do I need a password and login to look at my telephone bill? I don't
> care if the whole world knows it was 12.50.
>
> As you imply, you can't really have a rewarding experience, to coin a
> phrase, if you exclude Java and ActiveX. It might help if website
designers
> stopped going for the bells and whistles that most people don't give a
toss
> about, and flung out the Macromedia stuff and Flash, and just settled for
a
> plain and simple site that opened quickly, navigated faultlessly, and gave
> you the opportunity to go elsewhere if you really have to have the fancy
> stuff. Everyone wants to be an art director.
>
> They don't call me Victor Meldrew for nothing!
>
> David
>
>
> "DGuess" <majik@mindspring.oops> wrote in message
> news:ulRtiMAWFHA.132@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > "David Kelsey" <davidkelseyNO@SPAMmetronet.co.uk> wrote in message
> > news:%23V9mwW%23VFHA.2660@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> >> Spyware tends to be blamed for pretty well everything that goes wrong
> >> with computers, but does anyone know what the actual mechanism is that
> >> might cause a machine to go wrong? It can't really be in the interests
> >> of a spyware writer to stop computers working, can it? So are they
just
> >> incompetent programmers, or is there another less obvious agenda?
> >>
> >
> >
> > It's because these spyware writers don't write good code. They want it
out
> > fast and then have plausible deniability if something isn't right. How
> > many times have we heard of companies saying it couldn't be their code
> > thats messing it up and when it's uninstalled things seem to work right
> > again. Windows, IE and OE get blamed for a lot of things in which they
> > aren't the root cause. How many times have you heard people talk about
> > ActiveX like it was the worse thing in the world? ActiveX like Java
both
> > prompt for running unless you have it set to run without asking and
that's
> > a fairly stupid thing to do to begin with.
> >
> > If a publisher can't be verified, it should be a given to not install
> > whatever they are hawking.
> >
> > The programmers don't care as long as they can find a hook to get it
> > installed, be it on top of something else or just straight out.
> >
> > And thinking that Firefox or other browsers are safer is fairly lame as
> > well. You can still install a Java app and find out it's affected the
> > machine in other ways.
> >
> > You can also install that "just gotta have" screen saver or other
freebie
> > and find you've just infected your computer with junkware that really
> > won't uninstall. They don't care is the bottom line. Anything that tries
> > to install something else should be a warning sign that something is up.
> > Yes, some legitimate apps need to install other things, such as DirectX
or
> > .NET to work but things like these are fairly easy to find that they are
> > in the "good to install" category.
> >
> > Most users are fairly inexperienced around computers and the way they
> > work. It's easy to get this crapware by them. No matter how much I or
> > someone else may warn them, they still get the crap on there. They see
> > something and think it's okay to click on it and then you have some code
> > that no means yes and yes means no (and sometimes it doesn't matter
which
> > you click).
> >
> > Then you have the software that is supposed to stop all this stuff and
> > it's just as bad as the malware it's supposed to remove.
> >
> > Getting a user educated is not easy, they don't want to take the time to
> > have to think about something else other than what they think they want
to
> > do.
> >
> > And yes, I have told people in the past to box the computer up and send
it
> > back as they were too stupid to own one. While it's been few and far
> > between, I can only take so much of someone who can't remember how to
copy
> > or paste or where the START button is only so many times.
> >
> > Keep up to date Antivirus software and it's definitions, an anti-spyware
> > and it's definitions, a HOSTS file which will redirect some ads to the
> > local machine where it can't be found are some things everyone should
do.
> > The "up to date" part is the most neded once something is installed. I
> > know a guy here locally that swears he has an antivirus program and
can't
> > possibly be infected. He's also still in the mood of Windows 95 is a fad
> > and DOS RuLeZ!. Dr. Watson is the AV and there hasn't been definitions
for
> > it in ages but yet he maintains his computer isn't infected with
anything.
> > I can't recall how many times I've heard him say he had to rebuild his
> > hard drive because it wouldn't boot suddenly. Couldn't possibly be a
boot
> > virus of some type on there....
> >
> > I could go on and on about this but it doesn't do any good. People
install
> > things reguardless of the warnings they don't understand.
> >
>
>

DGuess
07-09-2005, 10:20 PM
"Doug Mc" <NOSPAMdougandnancymcneill@chilitech.com> wrote in message
news:uOOZPIPWFHA.3188@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Hi David,
>
> I'm back with my problem. I thought Spybot had it fixed but it seem that
> I'm still getting the error message each time I do something with Internet
> Explorer, so I expect it may be something else.
>
> Do you OR ANYONE OUT THERE have any other ideas??
>


Do you have Sun Java installed and did you clear it's cache as well? Some of
this crap rides shotgun in on it.

See the following page:

http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/unwanted.htm

Doug Mc
07-09-2005, 10:20 PM
David, I don't even know what Sun Java is, so I assume that I don't have it
installed!

Please hang in there with me. I'm very frustrated and I appreciate your
help.
Doug


"DGuess" <majik@mindspring.oops> wrote in message
news:%23FnFVZQWFHA.3488@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> "Doug Mc" <NOSPAMdougandnancymcneill@chilitech.com> wrote in message
> news:uOOZPIPWFHA.3188@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > Hi David,
> >
> > I'm back with my problem. I thought Spybot had it fixed but it seem
that
> > I'm still getting the error message each time I do something with
Internet
> > Explorer, so I expect it may be something else.
> >
> > Do you OR ANYONE OUT THERE have any other ideas??
> >
>
>
> Do you have Sun Java installed and did you clear it's cache as well? Some
of
> this crap rides shotgun in on it.
>
> See the following page:
>
> http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/unwanted.htm
>
>
>
>

Doug Mc
07-09-2005, 10:20 PM
Hello again David,
I clicked the URL below and went thru everything for changes. I then did
the CHECKYOURSYSTEM tests but the
"Qualys' Free Browser Checkup" would never execute!

Does that tell us anything??





"DGuess" <majik@mindspring.oops> wrote in message
news:%23FnFVZQWFHA.3488@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> "Doug Mc" <NOSPAMdougandnancymcneill@chilitech.com> wrote in message
> news:uOOZPIPWFHA.3188@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > Hi David,
> >
> > I'm back with my problem. I thought Spybot had it fixed but it seem
that
> > I'm still getting the error message each time I do something with
Internet
> > Explorer, so I expect it may be something else.
> >
> > Do you OR ANYONE OUT THERE have any other ideas??
> >
>
>
> Do you have Sun Java installed and did you clear it's cache as well? Some
of
> this crap rides shotgun in on it.
>
> See the following page:
>
> http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/unwanted.htm
>
>
>
>

DGuess
07-09-2005, 10:20 PM
"Doug Mc" <NOSPAMdougandnancymcneill@chilitech.com> wrote in message
news:u8qXyIaWFHA.132@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Hello again David,
> I clicked the URL below and went thru everything for changes. I then did
> the CHECKYOURSYSTEM tests but the
> "Qualys' Free Browser Checkup" would never execute!
>
> Does that tell us anything??
>


I don't know anything about them so I can't say if it does or doesn't.

The way I remove spyware is to go thru and shut down all user processes
except Explorer. Just the user, not the System, Local Service or NetWord
Services. The user processes have the username of the account next to them.
If you kill off Explorer, you might as well restart the computer. You can
learn to identify the processes such as printer, scanner, etc by their names
and the file locations. If you kill off a process and it starts back within
a few minutes, you may have found something. If you see something appear
back in the Run subkey (from below), you still have something running and
it's putting back something. Might be something there as well.

After that, I'll check Startup menu and move everything in there out to the
Desktop for the time being.

After that, I start regedit up and look thru the
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
Also check the RunOnce and RunOnceEx
for any items I can't easily identify. These may be programs stuck in the
Windows or System32 folder that show no properties such as the creator of
the software. I'll export the subkey then delete what I can't identify.

Then I'll run Adaware and Spybot to check for things. Even run HijackThis as
well to get a log.

After that, I'll reboot it and see how it runs.

I've had a good track record, I've only had one computer beat me that I
could absolutely not get all the crapware off of it. I've done well over 150
computers this way with good success.

Doug Mc
07-09-2005, 10:20 PM
Thanks David,
I'll try to work on it as you've described.

Thanks again for staying with me!
Doug



"DGuess" <majik@mindspring.oops> wrote in message
news:%23FnDciaWFHA.1696@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> "Doug Mc" <NOSPAMdougandnancymcneill@chilitech.com> wrote in message
> news:u8qXyIaWFHA.132@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > Hello again David,
> > I clicked the URL below and went thru everything for changes. I then
did
> > the CHECKYOURSYSTEM tests but the
> > "Qualys' Free Browser Checkup" would never execute!
> >
> > Does that tell us anything??
> >
>
>
> I don't know anything about them so I can't say if it does or doesn't.
>
> The way I remove spyware is to go thru and shut down all user processes
> except Explorer. Just the user, not the System, Local Service or NetWord
> Services. The user processes have the username of the account next to
them.
> If you kill off Explorer, you might as well restart the computer. You can
> learn to identify the processes such as printer, scanner, etc by their
names
> and the file locations. If you kill off a process and it starts back
within
> a few minutes, you may have found something. If you see something appear
> back in the Run subkey (from below), you still have something running and
> it's putting back something. Might be something there as well.
>
> After that, I'll check Startup menu and move everything in there out to
the
> Desktop for the time being.
>
> After that, I start regedit up and look thru the
> HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
> Also check the RunOnce and RunOnceEx
> for any items I can't easily identify. These may be programs stuck in the
> Windows or System32 folder that show no properties such as the creator of
> the software. I'll export the subkey then delete what I can't identify.
>
> Then I'll run Adaware and Spybot to check for things. Even run HijackThis
as
> well to get a log.
>
> After that, I'll reboot it and see how it runs.
>
> I've had a good track record, I've only had one computer beat me that I
> could absolutely not get all the crapware off of it. I've done well over
150
> computers this way with good success.
>
>
>


Getting an error message nearly every time!