Unicode & Character Map



Marilyn
07-10-2005, 01:41 AM
I apparently cannot understand the "Help" instruction special character to a
document with Unicode keystrokes. For example, to add a smiling smiley face,
the Unicode is 0x4A. The help indicates: have number lock on, hold down Alt
and type the code.

I have tried to do this repeatedly and it doesn't work for me, and I cannot
figure out what I'm doing wrong. Following the direction with num lock and
Alt I type 0 but then if I continue holding down alt & go to
alpha key x, I get a beep, so if I type x without Alt then go back to Num
keys for the 4, I seem to get this far but then when I try to type the A, I
don't get the smiley, sometimes depending on little quirks I get different
special characters. How does one read this instruction and carry it out?

--
Marilyn
0h7sl001@sneakemail.com

David Candy
07-10-2005, 01:41 AM
What you say isn't correct. The unicode number is a useles number. 4A is capital J anyway. Smileys are around 0x263A.

Firstly numbers must be in decimal. Use Calc in Scientific mode to convert. 0x signifies the rest of the number is in base 16 (hexidecimal) rather than base 10 (decimal).

Characters codes aren't unicodes. If there is a character code and it's not a key like A or @ (actually on your keyboard) then the character code appers on the right of the status bar. Character codes differ between languages.

Holding down alt and pressing the character code on the numeric keypad will enter that character. The keyboard language in use must support entering that character. If your keyboard supports it the code is shown on the right hand side of the status bar in Character Map else this section of the status bar is empty.
However there is two ways of entering codes. The point to remember here that the characters are the same for the first 127 codes. The difference is if the first number typed is a zero of not. If it is then the code will insert the character from the current character set else it will insert a character from the OEM character set.

E.G., Alt + 0 then 6 then 5 then release Alt enters the letter A

Smiley faces are 001 and 002 in Dos but Windows doesn't normally support these charactersand they aren't in most font files.

What you need to do is choose fonts like Wingdings/webdings/symbols. Enter the character code for these and also change the font.
--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.html
=================================================
"Marilyn" <0h7sl001@sneakemail.com> wrote in message news:dajc1g0n5f@enews1.newsguy.com...
>I apparently cannot understand the "Help" instruction special character to a
> document with Unicode keystrokes. For example, to add a smiling smiley face,
> the Unicode is 0x4A. The help indicates: have number lock on, hold down Alt
> and type the code.
>
> I have tried to do this repeatedly and it doesn't work for me, and I cannot
> figure out what I'm doing wrong. Following the direction with num lock and
> Alt I type 0 but then if I continue holding down alt & go to
> alpha key x, I get a beep, so if I type x without Alt then go back to Num
> keys for the 4, I seem to get this far but then when I try to type the A, I
> don't get the smiley, sometimes depending on little quirks I get different
> special characters. How does one read this instruction and carry it out?
>
> --
> Marilyn
> 0h7sl001@sneakemail.com
>
>
>

Marilyn
07-10-2005, 01:42 AM
Thanks, but I'm still having difficulty. I was using the Wingdings font and
in that font I saw the smiley face and I often want to use it so I wanted to
be able to easily enter it in a document. I understand I need to change font
to Wingdings but after I do, according to the character set in my WindowsXP,
the Alt-0x4A is the key sequence. And I couldn't get it to work and I still
cannot. I'm not able to understand Calc and Scientific mode etc. I just want
to know how to type the keys to get the smiley face result.

--
Marilyn
0h7sl001@sneakemail.com

"David Candy" <.> wrote in message
news:OqRzV$vgFHA.2156@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
What you say isn't correct. The unicode number is a useles number. 4A is
capital J anyway. Smileys are around 0x263A.

Firstly numbers must be in decimal. Use Calc in Scientific mode to convert.
0x signifies the rest of the number is in base 16 (hexidecimal) rather than
base 10 (decimal).

Characters codes aren't unicodes. If there is a character code and it's not
a key like A or @ (actually on your keyboard) then the character code appers
on the right of the status bar. Character codes differ between languages.

Holding down alt and pressing the character code on the numeric keypad will
enter that character. The keyboard language in use must support entering
that character. If your keyboard supports it the code is shown on the right
hand side of the status bar in Character Map else this section of the status
bar is empty.
However there is two ways of entering codes. The point to remember here that
the characters are the same for the first 127 codes. The difference is if
the first number typed is a zero of not. If it is then the code will insert
the character from the current character set else it will insert a character
from the OEM character set.

E.G., Alt + 0 then 6 then 5 then release Alt enters the letter A

Smiley faces are 001 and 002 in Dos but Windows doesn't normally support
these charactersand they aren't in most font files.

What you need to do is choose fonts like Wingdings/webdings/symbols. Enter
the character code for these and also change the font.
--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.html
=================================================
"Marilyn" <0h7sl001@sneakemail.com> wrote in message
news:dajc1g0n5f@enews1.newsguy.com...
>I apparently cannot understand the "Help" instruction special character to
>a
> document with Unicode keystrokes. For example, to add a smiling smiley
> face,
> the Unicode is 0x4A. The help indicates: have number lock on, hold down
> Alt
> and type the code.
>
> I have tried to do this repeatedly and it doesn't work for me, and I
> cannot
> figure out what I'm doing wrong. Following the direction with num lock and
> Alt I type 0 but then if I continue holding down alt & go to
> alpha key x, I get a beep, so if I type x without Alt then go back to Num
> keys for the 4, I seem to get this far but then when I try to type the A,
> I
> don't get the smiley, sometimes depending on little quirks I get different
> special characters. How does one read this instruction and carry it out?
>
> --
> Marilyn
> 0h7sl001@sneakemail.com
>
>
>

David Candy
07-10-2005, 01:42 AM
Start Calc, View menu - Scientific, click hexidecimal, enter 4A, click decimal, it says 74. So Alt + 074. Wingdings isn't a unicode font.

--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.html
=================================================
"Marilyn" <0h7sl001@sneakemail.com> wrote in message news:dak6rv01srt@enews1.newsguy.com...
> Thanks, but I'm still having difficulty. I was using the Wingdings font and
> in that font I saw the smiley face and I often want to use it so I wanted to
> be able to easily enter it in a document. I understand I need to change font
> to Wingdings but after I do, according to the character set in my WindowsXP,
> the Alt-0x4A is the key sequence. And I couldn't get it to work and I still
> cannot. I'm not able to understand Calc and Scientific mode etc. I just want
> to know how to type the keys to get the smiley face result.
>
> --
> Marilyn
> 0h7sl001@sneakemail.com
>
> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
> news:OqRzV$vgFHA.2156@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> What you say isn't correct. The unicode number is a useles number. 4A is
> capital J anyway. Smileys are around 0x263A.
>
> Firstly numbers must be in decimal. Use Calc in Scientific mode to convert.
> 0x signifies the rest of the number is in base 16 (hexidecimal) rather than
> base 10 (decimal).
>
> Characters codes aren't unicodes. If there is a character code and it's not
> a key like A or @ (actually on your keyboard) then the character code appers
> on the right of the status bar. Character codes differ between languages.
>
> Holding down alt and pressing the character code on the numeric keypad will
> enter that character. The keyboard language in use must support entering
> that character. If your keyboard supports it the code is shown on the right
> hand side of the status bar in Character Map else this section of the status
> bar is empty.
> However there is two ways of entering codes. The point to remember here that
> the characters are the same for the first 127 codes. The difference is if
> the first number typed is a zero of not. If it is then the code will insert
> the character from the current character set else it will insert a character
> from the OEM character set.
>
> E.G., Alt + 0 then 6 then 5 then release Alt enters the letter A
>
> Smiley faces are 001 and 002 in Dos but Windows doesn't normally support
> these charactersand they aren't in most font files.
>
> What you need to do is choose fonts like Wingdings/webdings/symbols. Enter
> the character code for these and also change the font.
> --
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.html
> =================================================
> "Marilyn" <0h7sl001@sneakemail.com> wrote in message
> news:dajc1g0n5f@enews1.newsguy.com...
>>I apparently cannot understand the "Help" instruction special character to
>>a
>> document with Unicode keystrokes. For example, to add a smiling smiley
>> face,
>> the Unicode is 0x4A. The help indicates: have number lock on, hold down
>> Alt
>> and type the code.
>>
>> I have tried to do this repeatedly and it doesn't work for me, and I
>> cannot
>> figure out what I'm doing wrong. Following the direction with num lock and
>> Alt I type 0 but then if I continue holding down alt & go to
>> alpha key x, I get a beep, so if I type x without Alt then go back to Num
>> keys for the 4, I seem to get this far but then when I try to type the A,
>> I
>> don't get the smiley, sometimes depending on little quirks I get different
>> special characters. How does one read this instruction and carry it out?
>>
>> --
>> Marilyn
>> 0h7sl001@sneakemail.com
>>
>>
>>
>
>

Marilyn
07-10-2005, 01:43 AM
Wonderful, thank you very much. I'm impressed. I had no idea that the
computer calculator had all those options. I didn't even understand that you
meant the computer calculator. But I just thought, maybe that was what you
meant. And I had no idea the computer calculator had all the modes, etc.
just like a "real" fancy scientific calculator.
--
Marilyn
0h7sl001@sneakemail.com

"David Candy" <.> wrote in message
news:uE8Ggn2gFHA.4000@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Start Calc, View menu - Scientific, click hexidecimal, enter 4A, click
decimal, it says 74. So Alt + 074. Wingdings isn't a unicode font.

--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.html
=================================================
"Marilyn" <0h7sl001@sneakemail.com> wrote in message
news:dak6rv01srt@enews1.newsguy.com...
> Thanks, but I'm still having difficulty. I was using the Wingdings font
> and
> in that font I saw the smiley face and I often want to use it so I wanted
> to
> be able to easily enter it in a document. I understand I need to change
> font
> to Wingdings but after I do, according to the character set in my
> WindowsXP,
> the Alt-0x4A is the key sequence. And I couldn't get it to work and I
> still
> cannot. I'm not able to understand Calc and Scientific mode etc. I just
> want
> to know how to type the keys to get the smiley face result.
>
> --
> Marilyn
> 0h7sl001@sneakemail.com
>
> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
> news:OqRzV$vgFHA.2156@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> What you say isn't correct. The unicode number is a useles number. 4A is
> capital J anyway. Smileys are around 0x263A.
>
> Firstly numbers must be in decimal. Use Calc in Scientific mode to
> convert.
> 0x signifies the rest of the number is in base 16 (hexidecimal) rather
> than
> base 10 (decimal).
>
> Characters codes aren't unicodes. If there is a character code and it's
> not
> a key like A or @ (actually on your keyboard) then the character code
> appers
> on the right of the status bar. Character codes differ between languages.
>
> Holding down alt and pressing the character code on the numeric keypad
> will
> enter that character. The keyboard language in use must support entering
> that character. If your keyboard supports it the code is shown on the
> right
> hand side of the status bar in Character Map else this section of the
> status
> bar is empty.
> However there is two ways of entering codes. The point to remember here
> that
> the characters are the same for the first 127 codes. The difference is if
> the first number typed is a zero of not. If it is then the code will
> insert
> the character from the current character set else it will insert a
> character
> from the OEM character set.
>
> E.G., Alt + 0 then 6 then 5 then release Alt enters the letter A
>
> Smiley faces are 001 and 002 in Dos but Windows doesn't normally support
> these charactersand they aren't in most font files.
>
> What you need to do is choose fonts like Wingdings/webdings/symbols. Enter
> the character code for these and also change the font.
> --
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.html
> =================================================
> "Marilyn" <0h7sl001@sneakemail.com> wrote in message
> news:dajc1g0n5f@enews1.newsguy.com...
>>I apparently cannot understand the "Help" instruction special character to
>>a
>> document with Unicode keystrokes. For example, to add a smiling smiley
>> face,
>> the Unicode is 0x4A. The help indicates: have number lock on, hold down
>> Alt
>> and type the code.
>>
>> I have tried to do this repeatedly and it doesn't work for me, and I
>> cannot
>> figure out what I'm doing wrong. Following the direction with num lock
>> and
>> Alt I type 0 but then if I continue holding down alt & go to
>> alpha key x, I get a beep, so if I type x without Alt then go back to Num
>> keys for the 4, I seem to get this far but then when I try to type the A,
>> I
>> don't get the smiley, sometimes depending on little quirks I get
>> different
>> special characters. How does one read this instruction and carry it out?
>>
>> --
>> Marilyn
>> 0h7sl001@sneakemail.com
>>
>>
>>
>
>

David Candy
07-10-2005, 01:43 AM
If you care about such things, the calc in XP looks exactl;y the same as it always has but has been upgraded to IEEE standards for maths (decimal points are hard to do in computers and are only approx - it solve probles where 1+1=1.9999999 - people freak out).

There is a download here
http://www.microsoft.com/globaldev/outreach/dnloads/downloads.mspx

This adds another 2 modes to calc - currency conversion (meant for when the euro come in) and a conversion calc (cubits to feet or whatever). It great to go to a bottleshop and order a 0.41576584067852985198736071844337 syou bottle of chardonay (750 ml approx 26 fl oz)


This one add graphing and a history (like a paper roll on an adding machine) and also has different modes and does NOT look like the other two. I think it's ugly.
www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/powertoys/xppowertoys.mspx
--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.html
=================================================
"Marilyn" <0h7sl001@sneakemail.com> wrote in message news:damo3v0gms@enews2.newsguy.com...
> Wonderful, thank you very much. I'm impressed. I had no idea that the
> computer calculator had all those options. I didn't even understand that you
> meant the computer calculator. But I just thought, maybe that was what you
> meant. And I had no idea the computer calculator had all the modes, etc.
> just like a "real" fancy scientific calculator.
> --
> Marilyn
> 0h7sl001@sneakemail.com
>
> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
> news:uE8Ggn2gFHA.4000@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Start Calc, View menu - Scientific, click hexidecimal, enter 4A, click
> decimal, it says 74. So Alt + 074. Wingdings isn't a unicode font.
>
> --
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.html
> =================================================
> "Marilyn" <0h7sl001@sneakemail.com> wrote in message
> news:dak6rv01srt@enews1.newsguy.com...
>> Thanks, but I'm still having difficulty. I was using the Wingdings font
>> and
>> in that font I saw the smiley face and I often want to use it so I wanted
>> to
>> be able to easily enter it in a document. I understand I need to change
>> font
>> to Wingdings but after I do, according to the character set in my
>> WindowsXP,
>> the Alt-0x4A is the key sequence. And I couldn't get it to work and I
>> still
>> cannot. I'm not able to understand Calc and Scientific mode etc. I just
>> want
>> to know how to type the keys to get the smiley face result.
>>
>> --
>> Marilyn
>> 0h7sl001@sneakemail.com
>>
>> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
>> news:OqRzV$vgFHA.2156@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> What you say isn't correct. The unicode number is a useles number. 4A is
>> capital J anyway. Smileys are around 0x263A.
>>
>> Firstly numbers must be in decimal. Use Calc in Scientific mode to
>> convert.
>> 0x signifies the rest of the number is in base 16 (hexidecimal) rather
>> than
>> base 10 (decimal).
>>
>> Characters codes aren't unicodes. If there is a character code and it's
>> not
>> a key like A or @ (actually on your keyboard) then the character code
>> appers
>> on the right of the status bar. Character codes differ between languages.
>>
>> Holding down alt and pressing the character code on the numeric keypad
>> will
>> enter that character. The keyboard language in use must support entering
>> that character. If your keyboard supports it the code is shown on the
>> right
>> hand side of the status bar in Character Map else this section of the
>> status
>> bar is empty.
>> However there is two ways of entering codes. The point to remember here
>> that
>> the characters are the same for the first 127 codes. The difference is if
>> the first number typed is a zero of not. If it is then the code will
>> insert
>> the character from the current character set else it will insert a
>> character
>> from the OEM character set.
>>
>> E.G., Alt + 0 then 6 then 5 then release Alt enters the letter A
>>
>> Smiley faces are 001 and 002 in Dos but Windows doesn't normally support
>> these charactersand they aren't in most font files.
>>
>> What you need to do is choose fonts like Wingdings/webdings/symbols. Enter
>> the character code for these and also change the font.
>> --
>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.html
>> =================================================
>> "Marilyn" <0h7sl001@sneakemail.com> wrote in message
>> news:dajc1g0n5f@enews1.newsguy.com...
>>>I apparently cannot understand the "Help" instruction special character to
>>>a
>>> document with Unicode keystrokes. For example, to add a smiling smiley
>>> face,
>>> the Unicode is 0x4A. The help indicates: have number lock on, hold down
>>> Alt
>>> and type the code.
>>>
>>> I have tried to do this repeatedly and it doesn't work for me, and I
>>> cannot
>>> figure out what I'm doing wrong. Following the direction with num lock
>>> and
>>> Alt I type 0 but then if I continue holding down alt & go to
>>> alpha key x, I get a beep, so if I type x without Alt then go back to Num
>>> keys for the 4, I seem to get this far but then when I try to type the A,
>>> I
>>> don't get the smiley, sometimes depending on little quirks I get
>>> different
>>> special characters. How does one read this instruction and carry it out?
>>>
>>> --
>>> Marilyn
>>> 0h7sl001@sneakemail.com
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>


Unicode & Character Map