OEM, DSP, Retail, and Corporate



Kenny S
07-10-2005, 01:08 AM
OEM, DSP, Retail, and Corporate

which of these can perform an upgrade?

thanks

Ken Blake
07-10-2005, 01:08 AM
In news:%23DxIoptXFHA.228@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
Kenny S <hotmail@coldmail.com> typed:

> OEM, DSP, Retail, and Corporate
>
> which of these can perform an upgrade?


First, there's no such thing as a "Corporate" edition. That's a
term usually used for pirated versions.

Only Retail editions can do upgrades.

--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup

Bruce Chambers
07-10-2005, 01:08 AM
Kenny S wrote:
> OEM, DSP, Retail, and Corporate
>
> which of these can perform an upgrade?
>
> thanks
>
>

Presumably, you're referring to types of WinXP installation
CDs/licenses? If so:

1. An OEM CD cannot be used to perform an upgrade of an earlier OS, as
it was designed to be installed _only_ upon an empty hard drive. It can
still be used to perform a repair installation (a.k.a. an in-place
upgrade) of an existing WinXP installation.

2. I'm not familiar with the acronym "DSP," other than as referring to
either "Digital Signal Processing" or "Democratic Socialist Party," so I
can't answer this one.

3. Retail CDs can be used to perform upgrades of earlier operating systems.

4. There's no such thing as "Corporate." That is a term applied
exclusively to pirated (iow, stolen) copies of the Volume Licensed WinXP
Pro by the "warez" aficionados. Volume Licensed CDs can perform
upgrades of earlier operating systems.



--

Bruce Chambers

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Kerry Brown
07-10-2005, 01:08 AM
"Kenny S" <hotmail@coldmail.com> wrote in message
news:%23DxIoptXFHA.228@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> OEM, DSP, Retail, and Corporate
>
> which of these can perform an upgrade?
>
> thanks
>

Do you want to know what can be done or what should be done according to the
EULA?

It is possible to fool all the versions of XP into doing an upgrade. You may
run into activation problems. Realistically it is not a good solution to use
a non-supported version to upgrade unless you are prepared to reinstall if
Microsoft decides you have done something wrong. It is also generally
accepted that an in place upgrade from an older OS is not the way to go. As
a clean install is usually the best option and the OEM version is cheaper
than the retail upgrade that's the option a lot of people choose.

Here is a link to the Microsoft supported upgrade paths.

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;292607

If you have more than five computers then a volume license (sometimes
mistakenly called corporate) may be the cheapest path.

http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/default.mspx

Kerry


OEM, DSP, Retail, and Corporate