USB Hard Drive



A.M
07-10-2005, 12:56 AM
Hi,

I have a 10,000 RPM HDD attached to my computer by using USB port. Do I
loose any HDD speed?
Is IDE HDD faster than USB HDDs?

Thanks,
Alan

Treeman
07-10-2005, 12:56 AM
Alan,
Hi-Speed USB 2.0 uses a "Master-Slave" architecture in which the
computer handles all arbitration functions and dictates data flow to,
from and between the attached peripherals (adding additional system
overhead and resulting in slower data flow control)

If you're primarily connecting to single devices, each interface will
provide satisfactory results in most desktop computing environments.
When you begin to push these technologies to their limits, either by
the types or number of devices you're connecting -- or by the specific
environment your working within, these technologies begin to fail in
very predictable ways due to their inherent design limitations. If you
are primarily working in a _single-drive_environment_ and you're not
dealing with particularly large amounts of data, IDE technology is
probably a good bang for your buck. Similarly, if you want to connect a
fairly low-speed desktop device like a zip drive to your computer, USB
should work very well. If you are dealing with digital video, or you
want to connect a single fairly high-speed device like a hard drive,
and you're more interested in simple hot-plugability, FireWire is a
great solution.
Hope this helps,
Treeman


--
Treeman


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A.M
07-10-2005, 12:56 AM
Thank Treeman for the information.

Do you know any place that shows speed benchmarks for USB HDDs, USB Keys and
IDE HDDs?

Thank you again,
Alan


"Treeman" <Treeman.1qyx4n@no-mx.msusenet.com> wrote in message
news:Treeman.1qyx4n@no-mx.msusenet.com...
>
> Alan,
> Hi-Speed USB 2.0 uses a "Master-Slave" architecture in which the
> computer handles all arbitration functions and dictates data flow to,
> from and between the attached peripherals (adding additional system
> overhead and resulting in slower data flow control)
>
> If you're primarily connecting to single devices, each interface will
> provide satisfactory results in most desktop computing environments.
> When you begin to push these technologies to their limits, either by
> the types or number of devices you're connecting -- or by the specific
> environment your working within, these technologies begin to fail in
> very predictable ways due to their inherent design limitations. If you
> are primarily working in a _single-drive_environment_ and you're not
> dealing with particularly large amounts of data, IDE technology is
> probably a good bang for your buck. Similarly, if you want to connect a
> fairly low-speed desktop device like a zip drive to your computer, USB
> should work very well. If you are dealing with digital video, or you
> want to connect a single fairly high-speed device like a hard drive,
> and you're more interested in simple hot-plugability, FireWire is a
> great solution.
> Hope this helps,
> Treeman
>
>
> --
> Treeman
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Treeman's Profile: http://www.msusenet.com/member.php?userid=1260
> View this thread: http://www.msusenet.com/t-1870551982
>

Treeman
07-10-2005, 12:56 AM
Alan,
You can start looking here;
'Tom's Hardware Guide' (http://www.tomshardware.com/index.html)
Join the community and start asking questions.
Warning, you may get some opionated answers here. (grin)
Best,
Treeman


--
Treeman


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Rube
07-10-2005, 12:57 AM
Most (if not all) USB hard drives are simply IDE hard drives inside an
enclosure. The enclosure has a little pcb inside with a usb interface on one
end, and an IDE cable on the other. Pop an old one open some day and you
will see that you can put any IDE drive in an enclosure. They even sell bare
enclosures at compusa now.

The max speed of the USB 2.0 interface is 480 megabits/sec (or 60
megabytes/sec) I don't know of any single disk systems that can maintain a
sustained transfer of 60 megabytes per second. To get that kind of speed,
you usually have to have a striped array.

HD Tach is a great measurement tool.
http://www.simplisoftware.com/Public/index.php?request=HdTach

"A.M" <alanalan@newsgroup.nospam> wrote in message
news:OmYVvwgdFHA.3184@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Hi,
>
> I have a 10,000 RPM HDD attached to my computer by using USB port. Do I
> loose any HDD speed?
> Is IDE HDD faster than USB HDDs?
>
> Thanks,
> Alan
>
>
>

Anna
07-10-2005, 12:57 AM
> "A.M" <alanalan@newsgroup.nospam> wrote in message
> news:OmYVvwgdFHA.3184@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> Hi,
>>
>> I have a 10,000 RPM HDD attached to my computer by using USB port. Do I
>> loose any HDD speed?
>> Is IDE HDD faster than USB HDDs?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Alan


"Rube" <dont@spam.me> wrote in message
news:ukasr$rdFHA.688@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Most (if not all) USB hard drives are simply IDE hard drives inside an
> enclosure. The enclosure has a little pcb inside with a usb interface on
> one
> end, and an IDE cable on the other. Pop an old one open some day and you
> will see that you can put any IDE drive in an enclosure. They even sell
> bare
> enclosures at compusa now.
>
> The max speed of the USB 2.0 interface is 480 megabits/sec (or 60
> megabytes/sec) I don't know of any single disk systems that can maintain a
> sustained transfer of 60 megabytes per second. To get that kind of speed,
> you usually have to have a striped array.
>
> HD Tach is a great measurement tool.
> http://www.simplisoftware.com/Public/index.php?request=HdTach


Alan:
It is true that if you measure the speed performance of a IDE HD in its USB
enclosure and that same HD mounted as an internal HD, you'll generally find
little if any difference as measured by HD Tach or similar drive speed
measuring tool.

However, there is a *considerable* speed performance difference, i.e., data
transfer rate, in a "real-life" scenario. For example, using a disk imaging
program such as Ghost or Acronis True Image to clone the contents of one's
internal HD to a USB 2.0 external HD, you'll get typical data transfer
speeds along the lines of 450 MB/min to 800 MB/min (using a medium-power
processor). Bear in mind we're talking about megabytes per minute. Data
transfer rates between two internal HDs in this scenario would be roughly
800 MB/min to 1.5 GB per/min.

So if you're using a USB 2.0 EHD that will be receiving or transmitting
relatively massive amounts of data, such as in the situation detailed above,
there is a decided performance "hit" using a USB EHD. On the other hand, if
you're primarily using the USB 2.0 EHD as a backup device for copying/moving
a relatively small amount of data between it and an internal HD, the
difference in actual transfer time is negligible - nothing to be really
concerned about. It's only when you're routinely receiving and transmitting
gigabytes of data between the internal HD and the USB 2.0 EHD that the speed
difference between the devices becomes truly meaningful.

All that I've said relates to 7200 rpm drives. I haven't worked with the
10,000 rpm drives in a USB EHD enclosure so it's entirely likely the data
transfer rate would be higher with that device.
Anna

A.M
07-10-2005, 12:57 AM
Thank you Rube.

I used the tool that you recommanded and it shows significant difference!
My SATA 160 GIG 7200 RPM HDD is almost 10 time faster than my 20 GIG 4200
RPM HDD plugged through USB.

Thanks again,
Alan




"Rube" <dont@spam.me> wrote in message
news:ukasr$rdFHA.688@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Most (if not all) USB hard drives are simply IDE hard drives inside an
> enclosure. The enclosure has a little pcb inside with a usb interface on
> one
> end, and an IDE cable on the other. Pop an old one open some day and you
> will see that you can put any IDE drive in an enclosure. They even sell
> bare
> enclosures at compusa now.
>
> The max speed of the USB 2.0 interface is 480 megabits/sec (or 60
> megabytes/sec) I don't know of any single disk systems that can maintain a
> sustained transfer of 60 megabytes per second. To get that kind of speed,
> you usually have to have a striped array.
>
> HD Tach is a great measurement tool.
> http://www.simplisoftware.com/Public/index.php?request=HdTach
>
> "A.M" <alanalan@newsgroup.nospam> wrote in message
> news:OmYVvwgdFHA.3184@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> Hi,
>>
>> I have a 10,000 RPM HDD attached to my computer by using USB port. Do I
>> loose any HDD speed?
>> Is IDE HDD faster than USB HDDs?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Alan
>>
>>
>>
>
>


USB Hard Drive