Power supply is frying



Mikey
07-10-2005, 12:49 AM
I have been in the business for 16 years, and have not seen anything like
this. It appears I have fried two power supplies on two computers. What is
strange is how it appears to have happened.

I am connecting to the internet via a cable modem, through a separate
router, then to a switch. All the computers are connected to the switch. Two
computers were having difficulty getting the IP address from the router, each
at separate times. With one computer I unplugged the router to connect the
computer directly to the cable modem. Upon unplugging the router from the
switch the computer shut off, and will not turn back on. The second computer
was left plugged into the switch. I removed power from the router. As soon as
I did, the computer shut off, and will not turn back on.

I don't see how the router (or anything on the network) could cause the
power supply to fry on a computer. Has anyone seen anything like this before?

Michael W. Ryder
07-10-2005, 12:49 AM
Mikey wrote:
> I have been in the business for 16 years, and have not seen anything like
> this. It appears I have fried two power supplies on two computers. What is
> strange is how it appears to have happened.
>
> I am connecting to the internet via a cable modem, through a separate
> router, then to a switch. All the computers are connected to the switch. Two
> computers were having difficulty getting the IP address from the router, each
> at separate times. With one computer I unplugged the router to connect the
> computer directly to the cable modem. Upon unplugging the router from the
> switch the computer shut off, and will not turn back on. The second computer
> was left plugged into the switch. I removed power from the router. As soon as
> I did, the computer shut off, and will not turn back on.
>
> I don't see how the router (or anything on the network) could cause the
> power supply to fry on a computer. Has anyone seen anything like this before?


Are you sure that it is the power supply and not the motherboard? The
reason I ask is that there is a thread in another group where people are
frying the Southbridge on motherboards plugging in a USB cable. It may
be related.

Mikey
07-10-2005, 12:49 AM
"Michael W. Ryder" wrote:

> Are you sure that it is the power supply and not the motherboard? The
> reason I ask is that there is a thread in another group where people are
> frying the Southbridge on motherboards plugging in a USB cable. It may
> be related.

At this point I believe anything is possible. The router and cable modem
were both connected via Cat5. However, the mouse is USB. I just don't see how
anything over the Cat5 can fry a computer. Especially when removing power to
the router. But is was simultaneous. Very strange to me.

River_Rat
07-10-2005, 12:49 AM
Hello Mikey
The only thing to do is a little troubleshooting.
First take the side off the computer and look to see if there is a little
green or red light on the MB usually around the center.
What make & model of computers?
Have you tried unplugging the power supply and then plug it back in?
Are you able to use a Volt-Ohm Meter?
On an ATX power supply pin #9 & #14 should have 5 volts DC with the PS
plugged in.

--
Good Day
River Rat




"Mikey" <Mikey@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:324451FD-25A8-4C33-B88A-B74DAC2C0744@microsoft.com...
I have been in the business for 16 years, and have not seen anything like
this. It appears I have fried two power supplies on two computers. What is
strange is how it appears to have happened.

I am connecting to the internet via a cable modem, through a separate
router, then to a switch. All the computers are connected to the switch. Two
computers were having difficulty getting the IP address from the router,
each
at separate times. With one computer I unplugged the router to connect the
computer directly to the cable modem. Upon unplugging the router from the
switch the computer shut off, and will not turn back on. The second computer
was left plugged into the switch. I removed power from the router. As soon
as
I did, the computer shut off, and will not turn back on.

I don't see how the router (or anything on the network) could cause the
power supply to fry on a computer. Has anyone seen anything like this
before?

Mikey
07-10-2005, 12:49 AM
"River_Rat" wrote:

> Hello Mikey
> The only thing to do is a little troubleshooting.
> First take the side off the computer and look to see if there is a little
> green or red light on the MB usually around the center.
> What make & model of computers?
> Have you tried unplugging the power supply and then plug it back in?
> Are you able to use a Volt-Ohm Meter?
> On an ATX power supply pin #9 & #14 should have 5 volts DC with the PS
> plugged in.
>
> --
> Good Day
> River Rat
>
>
Thanks River Rat!

Neither board has an LED on it. They are both older P3 systems. One I build
myself using an Abit BH-6 board, the other was built by a friend using a dual
P3 on a Tyan Tiger board.

I don't have a volt-Ohm meter, so I got another PS. The BH-6 system fires up
with the new PS. The dual P3 system does not. Looks like the board is out on
that system. Hopefully, it isn't something on the BH-6 board frying the PSs.
It is weird how both went down under similar circumstances.

w_tom
07-10-2005, 12:49 AM
One possiblity is static electricity. Once the static
discharge exceeds a breakdown voltage (ie less than 2000
volts), then electric current has a short circuit into
computer semiconductors.

Then there is a power supply controller located on
motherboard. Also if something on motherboard can damage a
power supply, then the power supply was defective. A function
often missing on discount supplies.

Of course a fastest and most informative way to answer your
questions and doubts would have been obtained from a $20
multimeter. Without numbers from that meter, then every
response can only be speculation.

Mikey wrote:
> At this point I believe anything is possible. The router and cable
> modem were both connected via Cat5. However, the mouse is USB. I
> just don't see how anything over the Cat5 can fry a computer.
> Especially when removing power to the router. But is was
> simultaneous. Very strange to me.

Chuck
07-10-2005, 12:49 AM
I'd wonder about faulty grounds and AC power wiring problems.

"w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:42851021.F4A7B000@hotmail.com...
> One possiblity is static electricity. Once the static
> discharge exceeds a breakdown voltage (ie less than 2000
> volts), then electric current has a short circuit into
> computer semiconductors.
>
> Then there is a power supply controller located on
> motherboard. Also if something on motherboard can damage a
> power supply, then the power supply was defective. A function
> often missing on discount supplies.
>
> Of course a fastest and most informative way to answer your
> questions and doubts would have been obtained from a $20
> multimeter. Without numbers from that meter, then every
> response can only be speculation.
>
> Mikey wrote:
>> At this point I believe anything is possible. The router and cable
>> modem were both connected via Cat5. However, the mouse is USB. I
>> just don't see how anything over the Cat5 can fry a computer.
>> Especially when removing power to the router. But is was
>> simultaneous. Very strange to me.


Power supply is frying