Slow computer



Rob graham
07-09-2005, 11:55 PM
Occasionally my PC goes slow. I cannot see why it does it. Today it's been
fine, yesterday not so. I note that the paging file has an initial size of
384 mb and a maximum of 768 mb, and is currently running at 441 mb. If I
increase the size, is there a downside to this? I haven't understood why
Windows has restricted itself to 768 mb. Mind you, I'm not sure that this
would cure my problem - which seems intermittent - but I do occasionally get
a message saying that I'm running short of memory and Windows is increasing
the size of the virtual memory.

Rob Graham

AllenM
07-09-2005, 11:55 PM
The size of your page file it contingent upon how much physical RAM you
have. Rule of thunb is 1.5 times more than the physical. So if I have 512 MB
RAM I would set my page file at 512MB-768MB. Another good idea is to move
the page file off of the system partition.


"Rob graham" <rttgrahamwow@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:d7ktvs$g0o$1@nwrdmz02.dmz.ncs.ea.ibs-infra.bt.com...
> Occasionally my PC goes slow. I cannot see why it does it. Today it's been
> fine, yesterday not so. I note that the paging file has an initial size of
> 384 mb and a maximum of 768 mb, and is currently running at 441 mb. If I
> increase the size, is there a downside to this? I haven't understood why
> Windows has restricted itself to 768 mb. Mind you, I'm not sure that this
> would cure my problem - which seems intermittent - but I do occasionally
> get a message saying that I'm running short of memory and Windows is
> increasing the size of the virtual memory.
>
> Rob Graham
>

Byte
07-09-2005, 11:55 PM
You did not state how much memory (RAM) you have installed. Many
PC operators set the Virtual Memory (page file) size to 2 1/2 times the RAM
for Max. Windows does not restrict itself to 768mb, it is the default size.
I know of no downside for doing this. The increase could also solve your
problem.
--
Some days you're the windshield,
some days you're the bug.


"Rob graham" wrote:

> Occasionally my PC goes slow. I cannot see why it does it. Today it's been
> fine, yesterday not so. I note that the paging file has an initial size of
> 384 mb and a maximum of 768 mb, and is currently running at 441 mb. If I
> increase the size, is there a downside to this? I haven't understood why
> Windows has restricted itself to 768 mb. Mind you, I'm not sure that this
> would cure my problem - which seems intermittent - but I do occasionally get
> a message saying that I'm running short of memory and Windows is increasing
> the size of the virtual memory.
>
> Rob Graham
>
>
>

Rock
07-09-2005, 11:55 PM
Rob graham wrote:

> Occasionally my PC goes slow. I cannot see why it does it. Today it's been
> fine, yesterday not so. I note that the paging file has an initial size of
> 384 mb and a maximum of 768 mb, and is currently running at 441 mb. If I
> increase the size, is there a downside to this? I haven't understood why
> Windows has restricted itself to 768 mb. Mind you, I'm not sure that this
> would cure my problem - which seems intermittent - but I do occasionally get
> a message saying that I'm running short of memory and Windows is increasing
> the size of the virtual memory.
>
> Rob Graham
>
>

See this excellent link about virtual memory and setting the page file.
The old rule of thumb to use 1.5x memory is not applicable in XP:
http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.htm

See this link for some information on diagnosing a slow computer:
http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/slowcom.htm

--
Rock
MS MVP Windows - Shell/User

Ken Blake
07-09-2005, 11:55 PM
n news:uVZhPftZFHA.3032@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
AllenM <allen.myake@gmail.com> typed:

> The size of your page file it contingent upon how much physical
> RAM
> you have. Rule of thunb is 1.5 times more than the physical. So
> if I
> have 512 MB RAM I would set my page file at 512MB-768MB.


So if someone has 64MB of RAM (the official minimum for Windows
XP), he should have 96MB of page file? If your page file is that
small, the computer will hardly be able to run any applications
at all.

And if you have 2GB of RAM (more than almost anybody needs), you
should have 3GB of page file? That's almost certainly far more
than is needed, and is just a waste of disk space.


Although that 1.5 times is the default, it's not a good one. The
more RAM you have, the *less* page file you need.



> Another good
> idea is to move the page file off of the system partition.


If you mean to another partition on your only hard drive, no this
is not a good idea, and can hurt your performance. What it does
is move the page file to a location on the hard drive distant
from the other frequently-used data on the drive. The result is
that every time Windows needs to use the page file, the time to
get to it and back from it is increased.
Putting the swap file on a second *physical* drive is a good
idea, since it decreases head movement, but not to a second
partition on a single drive. A good rule of thumb is that the
page file should be on the most-used partition of the least-used
physical drive. For almost everyone with a single drive, that's
C:.



For good info on the page file, read the late Alex Nichol's
article at http://www.aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.htm


--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup

AllenM
07-09-2005, 11:55 PM
If running applications is an issue with you then upgrading to physical
memory is a better option. Page filing is an enhancement to physical memory.
You want the majority of your memory processes to be handle by the physical
memory. The larger the page file the more fragmentation you're going to
have. If you are only using 64 MB on an XP machine then you should not
complain about your machine being slow. Most people prefer to set the
minimum and maximum the same to avoid fragmentation. What the standard
setting for the size of the page file should be is always changing. I
remember in the old days of Win95 the recommended size was physical RAM
minimum plus 11MB more for the maximum. You get different answers from the
exact size, to 1.5 times the physical to 2.5 times the physical. Point is
the more RAM you have the smaller your pagefile should be.


"Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
news:%23idU4IuZFHA.3568@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>n news:uVZhPftZFHA.3032@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
> AllenM <allen.myake@gmail.com> typed:
>
>> The size of your page file it contingent upon how much physical RAM
>> you have. Rule of thunb is 1.5 times more than the physical. So if I
>> have 512 MB RAM I would set my page file at 512MB-768MB.
>
>
> So if someone has 64MB of RAM (the official minimum for Windows XP), he
> should have 96MB of page file? If your page file is that small, the
> computer will hardly be able to run any applications at all.
>
> And if you have 2GB of RAM (more than almost anybody needs), you should
> have 3GB of page file? That's almost certainly far more than is needed,
> and is just a waste of disk space.
>
>
> Although that 1.5 times is the default, it's not a good one. The more RAM
> you have, the *less* page file you need.
>
>
>
>> Another good
>> idea is to move the page file off of the system partition.
>
>
> If you mean to another partition on your only hard drive, no this is not a
> good idea, and can hurt your performance. What it does is move the page
> file to a location on the hard drive distant from the other
> frequently-used data on the drive. The result is that every time Windows
> needs to use the page file, the time to get to it and back from it is
> increased.
> Putting the swap file on a second *physical* drive is a good idea, since
> it decreases head movement, but not to a second partition on a single
> drive. A good rule of thumb is that the page file should be on the
> most-used partition of the least-used physical drive. For almost everyone
> with a single drive, that's C:.
>
>
>
> For good info on the page file, read the late Alex Nichol's article at
> http://www.aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.htm
>
>
> --
> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
> Please reply to the newsgroup
>
>

NotMe
07-09-2005, 11:55 PM
I set my pagefile to "system managed" size.
IF it needs more room, it takes it; if it needs less, it doesn't.
The downside of a set size is the possibility of exceeding whatever
arbitrary amount you have set.
My system has 1GB of physical RAM.

--
A Professional Amatuer...If anyone knew it all, none of would be here!
"Rob graham" <rttgrahamwow@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:d7ktvs$g0o$1@nwrdmz02.dmz.ncs.ea.ibs-infra.bt.com...
> Occasionally my PC goes slow. I cannot see why it does it. Today it's been
> fine, yesterday not so. I note that the paging file has an initial size of
> 384 mb and a maximum of 768 mb, and is currently running at 441 mb. If I
> increase the size, is there a downside to this? I haven't understood why
> Windows has restricted itself to 768 mb. Mind you, I'm not sure that this
> would cure my problem - which seems intermittent - but I do occasionally
> get a message saying that I'm running short of memory and Windows is
> increasing the size of the virtual memory.
>
> Rob Graham
>


Slow computer