Does XP have any built in macro facility?



Jones
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
Hello
Does windows xp have any natural built in macro facility?

Curmudgeon
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
no

Kinell
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
"Jones" <jones@noreply.com> wrote in news:d7ddj0$sgl$1
@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk:

> Hello
> Does windows xp have any natural built in macro facility?
>

If by 'macro' you mean a capability to enable the user to create
commands:
- DOS-like commands in a command window or batch file
- Scripting using VB or J-script, see:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-
us/dnanchor/html/scriptinga.asp

Jones
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
"Kinell" <w@invalid.jp> wrote in message
news:Xns9665EB362A7EFkxxx@62.253.162.201...
> "Jones" <jones@noreply.com> wrote in news:d7ddj0$sgl$1
> @newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk:
>
>> Hello
>> Does windows xp have any natural built in macro facility?
>>
>
> If by 'macro' you mean a capability to enable the user to create
> commands:
> - DOS-like commands in a command window or batch file
> - Scripting using VB or J-script, see:
> http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-
> us/dnanchor/html/scriptinga.asp

Hi
I basically meant the ability to like replace setences with a few key
strokes. That kind of thing

Kinell
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
"Jones" <jones@noreply.com> wrote in
news:d7dh9v$55e$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk:

>
> "Kinell" <w@invalid.jp> wrote in message
> news:Xns9665EB362A7EFkxxx@62.253.162.201...
>> "Jones" <jones@noreply.com> wrote in news:d7ddj0$sgl$1
>> @newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk:
>>
>>> Hello
>>> Does windows xp have any natural built in macro facility?
>>>
>>
>> If by 'macro' you mean a capability to enable the user to
>> create commands:
>> - DOS-like commands in a command window or batch file
>> - Scripting using VB or J-script, see:
>> http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-
>> us/dnanchor/html/scriptinga.asp
>
> Hi
> I basically meant the ability to like replace setences with a
> few key strokes. That kind of thing
>
Particular apps can do that, e.g. Word, but I don't know of a
Windows-level feature that does it. No doubt there are 3rd-party
utilities that can do it.

Wesley Vogel
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
You can find the first two by opening Help and Support on your machine.

Macros
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/ras_how_m.mspx

Doskey
[[Calls Doskey.exe, which recalls Windows XP commands, edits command lines,
and creates macros.]]
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/doskey.mspx

Open a command prompt and type:

Doskey /?

Hit your Enter key.
---

HOW TO: Access Sample Macros for Word 2000
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;237356

--
Hope this helps. Let us know.

Wes
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

In news:d7dh9v$55e$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk,
Jones <jones@noreply.com> hunted and pecked:
> "Kinell" <w@invalid.jp> wrote in message
> news:Xns9665EB362A7EFkxxx@62.253.162.201...
>> "Jones" <jones@noreply.com> wrote in news:d7ddj0$sgl$1
>> @newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk:
>>
>>> Hello
>>> Does windows xp have any natural built in macro facility?
>>>
>>
>> If by 'macro' you mean a capability to enable the user to create
>> commands:
>> - DOS-like commands in a command window or batch file
>> - Scripting using VB or J-script, see:
>> http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-
>> us/dnanchor/html/scriptinga.asp
>
> Hi
> I basically meant the ability to like replace setences with a few key
> strokes. That kind of thing

David Candy
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
Create a text file and paste these lines in and name it WhateverYouWant.vbs. In this example it cuts and pastes between two windows. See below for sendkeys docs.


set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.­Shell")
WshShell.SendKeys "%{TAB}^c%{TAB}^v"
[above sends Alt + Tab, Ctrl + C, Alt + Tab, then Ctrl + V]


Then set a shortcut to the scripts (right click it and choose Copy, go to the Desktop, a sub folder of the desktop, or on the Start Menu somewhere [right click Start and choose Open] and right click a blank area and choose Paste Shortcut) and set a hotkey for the shortcut (see help - but right click shortcut and choose Properties and look on the general tab - a lot of keys aren't available).


You may want to know these additional commands.


WSHShell.Run("c:\command.exe", 0, True)
==============================­===
With Param 1 being the command, Param 2 the window style (see below), and Param 3 a flag to indicate if to wait at this command untill the program started has exited - True it does and false it doesn't. Look in the Shortcut's Properties of the Start Menu shortcuts to see some command lines. You can also put document names in and have the Open command run on them.


Window Style
------------------
0 Hides the window and activates another window.
1 Activates and displays a window. If the window is minimized or maximized, the system restores it to its original size and position. An application should specify this flag when displaying the window for the first time.
2 Activates the window and displays it as a minimized window.
3 Activates the window and displays it as a maximized window.
4 Displays a window in its most recent size and position. The active window remains active.
5 Activates the window and displays it in its current size and position.
6 Minimizes the specified window and activates the next top-level window in the Z order.
7 Displays the window as a minimized window. The active window remains active.
8 Displays the window in its current state. The active window remains active.
9 Activates and displays the window. If the window is minimized or maximized, the system restores it to its original size and position. An application should specify this flag when restoring a minimized window.
10 Sets the show-state based on the state of the program that started the application.


WSHShell.AppActivate "window title"


==============================


In determining which application to activate, the specified title is compared to the title string of each running application. If no exact match exists, any application whose title string begins with title is activated. If an application still cannot be found, any application whose title string ends with title is activated. If more than one instance of the application named by title exists, one instance is arbitrarily activated.


Use this to switch between windows and to make sure your sendkeys go to the right window.


WScript.Sleep 50
==============


Sends your program to sleep for the milliseconds specified. Sometimes you may need to do this to give the recieving program the ability to process your commands (as you are blocking it from running by sending it keystrokes) or more frequently to give a process enough time to complete.


SendKeys Syntax
==============


Sends one or more keystrokes to the active window (as if typed on the keyboard).


object.SendKeys(string)Argumen­ts
object
WshShell object.
string
String value indicating the keystroke(s) you want to send.
Remarks
Use the SendKeys method to send keystrokes to applications that have no automation interface. Most keyboard characters are represented by a single keystroke. Some keyboard characters are made up of combinations of keystrokes (CTRL+SHIFT+HOME, for example). To send a single keyboard character, send the character itself as the string argument. For example, to send the letter x, send the string argument "x".


Note To send a space, send the string " ".
You can use SendKeys to send more than one keystroke at a time. To do this, create a compound string argument that represents a sequence of keystrokes by appending each keystroke in the sequence to the one before it. For example, to send the keystrokes a, b, and c, you would send the string argument "abc". The SendKeys method uses some characters as modifiers of characters (instead of using their face-values). This set of special characters consists of parentheses, brackets, braces, and the:


a.. plus sign "+",
b.. caret "^",
c.. percent sign "%",
d.. and tilde "~"
Send these characters by enclosing them within braces "{}". For example, to send the plus sign, send the string argument "{+}". Brackets "[ ]" have no special meaning when used with SendKeys, but you must enclose them within braces to accommodate applications that do give them a special meaning (for dynamic data exchange (DDE) for example).


a.. To send bracket characters, send the string argument "{[}" for the left bracket and "{]}" for the right one.
b.. To send brace characters, send the string argument "{{}" for the left brace and "{}}" for the right one.
Some keystrokes do not generate characters (such as ENTER and TAB). Some keystrokes represent actions (such as BACKSPACE and BREAK). To send these kinds of keystrokes, send the arguments shown in the following table:


Key Argument
BACKSPACE {BACKSPACE}, {BS}, or {BKSP}
BREAK {BREAK}
CAPS LOCK {CAPSLOCK}
DEL or DELETE {DELETE} or {DEL}
DOWN ARROW {DOWN}
END {END}
ENTER {ENTER} or ~
ESC {ESC}
HELP {HELP}
HOME {HOME}
INS or INSERT {INSERT} or {INS}
LEFT ARROW {LEFT}
NUM LOCK {NUMLOCK}
PAGE DOWN {PGDN}
PAGE UP {PGUP}
PRINT SCREEN {PRTSC}
RIGHT ARROW {RIGHT}
SCROLL LOCK {SCROLLLOCK}
TAB {TAB}
UP ARROW {UP}
F1 {F1}
F2 {F2}
F3 {F3}
F4 {F4}
F5 {F5}
F6 {F6}
F7 {F7}
F8 {F8}
F9 {F9}
F10 {F10}
F11 {F11}
F12 {F12}
F13 {F13}
F14 {F14}
F15 {F15}
F16 {F16}


To send keyboard characters that are comprised of a regular keystroke in combination with a SHIFT, CTRL, or ALT, create a compound string argument that represents the keystroke combination. You do this by preceding the regular keystroke with one or more of the following special characters:


Key Special Character
SHIFT +
CTRL ^
ALT %


Note When used this way, these special characters are not enclosed within a set of braces.
To specify that a combination of SHIFT, CTRL, and ALT should be held down while several other keys are pressed, create a compound string argument with the modified keystrokes enclosed in parentheses. For example, to send the keystroke combination that specifies that the SHIFT key is held down while:


a.. e and c are pressed, send the string argument "+(ec)".
b.. e is pressed, followed by a lone c (with no SHIFT), send the string argument "+ec".
You can use the SendKeys method to send a pattern of keystrokes that consists of a single keystroke pressed several times in a row. To do this, create a compound string argument that specifies the keystroke you want to repeat, followed by the number of times you want it repeated. You do this using a compound string argument of the form {keystroke number}. For example, to send the letter "x" ten times, you would send the string argument "{x 10}". Be sure to include a space between keystroke and number.


Note The only keystroke pattern you can send is the kind that is comprised of a single keystroke pressed several times. For example, you can send "x" ten times, but you cannot do the same for "Ctrl+x".
Note You cannot send the PRINT SCREEN key {PRTSC} to an application.



--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.html
=================================================
"Jones" <jones@noreply.com> wrote in message news:d7ddj0$sgl$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk...
> Hello
> Does windows xp have any natural built in macro facility?
>
>

Jones
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
"Wesley Vogel" <123WVogel955@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:OSQnQmKZFHA.1044@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> You can find the first two by opening Help and Support on your machine.
>
> Macros
> http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/ras_how_m.mspx
>
> Doskey
> [[Calls Doskey.exe, which recalls Windows XP commands, edits command
> lines,
> and creates macros.]]
> http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/doskey.mspx
>
> Open a command prompt and type:
>
> Doskey /?
>
> Hit your Enter key.
> ---
>
> HOW TO: Access Sample Macros for Word 2000
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;237356
>
> --
> Hope this helps. Let us know.
>
> Wes
> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>

Hi Wes

Many thanks for your info It'll take some reading though :)

Jones
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
"David Candy" <.> wrote in message
news:ecNMiDMZFHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Create a text file and paste these lines in and name it WhateverYouWant.vbs.
In this example it cuts and pastes between two windows. See below for
sendkeys docs.


set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.­Shell")
WshShell.SendKeys "%{TAB}^c%{TAB}^v"
[above sends Alt + Tab, Ctrl + C, Alt + Tab, then Ctrl + V]


Then set a shortcut to the scripts (right click it and choose Copy, go to
the Desktop, a sub folder of the desktop, or on the Start Menu somewhere
[right click Start and choose Open] and right click a blank area and choose
Paste Shortcut) and set a hotkey for the shortcut (see help - but right
click shortcut and choose Properties and look on the general tab - a lot of
keys aren't available).


You may want to know these additional commands.


WSHShell.Run("c:\command.exe", 0, True)
==============================­===
With Param 1 being the command, Param 2 the window style (see below), and
Param 3 a flag to indicate if to wait at this command untill the program
started has exited - True it does and false it doesn't. Look in the
Shortcut's Properties of the Start Menu shortcuts to see some command lines.
You can also put document names in and have the Open command run on them.


Window Style
------------------
0 Hides the window and activates another window.
1 Activates and displays a window. If the window is minimized or maximized,
the system restores it to its original size and position. An application
should specify this flag when displaying the window for the first time.
2 Activates the window and displays it as a minimized window.
3 Activates the window and displays it as a maximized window.
4 Displays a window in its most recent size and position. The active window
remains active.
5 Activates the window and displays it in its current size and position.
6 Minimizes the specified window and activates the next top-level window in
the Z order.
7 Displays the window as a minimized window. The active window remains
active.
8 Displays the window in its current state. The active window remains
active.
9 Activates and displays the window. If the window is minimized or
maximized, the system restores it to its original size and position. An
application should specify this flag when restoring a minimized window.
10 Sets the show-state based on the state of the program that started the
application.


WSHShell.AppActivate "window title"


==============================


In determining which application to activate, the specified title is
compared to the title string of each running application. If no exact match
exists, any application whose title string begins with title is activated.
If an application still cannot be found, any application whose title string
ends with title is activated. If more than one instance of the application
named by title exists, one instance is arbitrarily activated.


Use this to switch between windows and to make sure your sendkeys go to the
right window.


WScript.Sleep 50
==============


Sends your program to sleep for the milliseconds specified. Sometimes you
may need to do this to give the recieving program the ability to process
your commands (as you are blocking it from running by sending it keystrokes)
or more frequently to give a process enough time to complete.


SendKeys Syntax
==============


Sends one or more keystrokes to the active window (as if typed on the
keyboard).


object.SendKeys(string)Argumen­ts
object
WshShell object.
string
String value indicating the keystroke(s) you want to send.
Remarks
Use the SendKeys method to send keystrokes to applications that have no
automation interface. Most keyboard characters are represented by a single
keystroke. Some keyboard characters are made up of combinations of
keystrokes (CTRL+SHIFT+HOME, for example). To send a single keyboard
character, send the character itself as the string argument. For example, to
send the letter x, send the string argument "x".


Note To send a space, send the string " ".
You can use SendKeys to send more than one keystroke at a time. To do this,
create a compound string argument that represents a sequence of keystrokes
by appending each keystroke in the sequence to the one before it. For
example, to send the keystrokes a, b, and c, you would send the string
argument "abc". The SendKeys method uses some characters as modifiers of
characters (instead of using their face-values). This set of special
characters consists of parentheses, brackets, braces, and the:


a.. plus sign "+",
b.. caret "^",
c.. percent sign "%",
d.. and tilde "~"
Send these characters by enclosing them within braces "{}". For example, to
send the plus sign, send the string argument "{+}". Brackets "[ ]" have no
special meaning when used with SendKeys, but you must enclose them within
braces to accommodate applications that do give them a special meaning (for
dynamic data exchange (DDE) for example).


a.. To send bracket characters, send the string argument "{[}" for the
left bracket and "{]}" for the right one.
b.. To send brace characters, send the string argument "{{}" for the left
brace and "{}}" for the right one.
Some keystrokes do not generate characters (such as ENTER and TAB). Some
keystrokes represent actions (such as BACKSPACE and BREAK). To send these
kinds of keystrokes, send the arguments shown in the following table:


Key Argument
BACKSPACE {BACKSPACE}, {BS}, or {BKSP}
BREAK {BREAK}
CAPS LOCK {CAPSLOCK}
DEL or DELETE {DELETE} or {DEL}
DOWN ARROW {DOWN}
END {END}
ENTER {ENTER} or ~
ESC {ESC}
HELP {HELP}
HOME {HOME}
INS or INSERT {INSERT} or {INS}
LEFT ARROW {LEFT}
NUM LOCK {NUMLOCK}
PAGE DOWN {PGDN}
PAGE UP {PGUP}
PRINT SCREEN {PRTSC}
RIGHT ARROW {RIGHT}
SCROLL LOCK {SCROLLLOCK}
TAB {TAB}
UP ARROW {UP}
F1 {F1}
F2 {F2}
F3 {F3}
F4 {F4}
F5 {F5}
F6 {F6}
F7 {F7}
F8 {F8}
F9 {F9}
F10 {F10}
F11 {F11}
F12 {F12}
F13 {F13}
F14 {F14}
F15 {F15}
F16 {F16}


To send keyboard characters that are comprised of a regular keystroke in
combination with a SHIFT, CTRL, or ALT, create a compound string argument
that represents the keystroke combination. You do this by preceding the
regular keystroke with one or more of the following special characters:


Key Special Character
SHIFT +
CTRL ^
ALT %


Note When used this way, these special characters are not enclosed
within a set of braces.
To specify that a combination of SHIFT, CTRL, and ALT should be held down
while several other keys are pressed, create a compound string argument with
the modified keystrokes enclosed in parentheses. For example, to send the
keystroke combination that specifies that the SHIFT key is held down while:


a.. e and c are pressed, send the string argument "+(ec)".
b.. e is pressed, followed by a lone c (with no SHIFT), send the string
argument "+ec".
You can use the SendKeys method to send a pattern of keystrokes that
consists of a single keystroke pressed several times in a row. To do this,
create a compound string argument that specifies the keystroke you want to
repeat, followed by the number of times you want it repeated. You do this
using a compound string argument of the form {keystroke number}. For
example, to send the letter "x" ten times, you would send the string
argument "{x 10}". Be sure to include a space between keystroke and number.


Note The only keystroke pattern you can send is the kind that is
comprised of a single keystroke pressed several times. For example, you can
send "x" ten times, but you cannot do the same for "Ctrl+x".
Note You cannot send the PRINT SCREEN key {PRTSC} to an application.


Thanks Dave,

My gosh! That is one of the most technical and complete answers I've ever
recieved! You must be a technowhiz or a progrmmer, I'm not sure if that is
at my level, I mean I think I might be a bit below that level of easy
understanding but I'll go through it and learn something for sure. Thanks
again for the time taken your posts really appreciated. >

David Candy
07-09-2005, 11:50 PM
So if you just want to input your name if you press Ctrl + Alt + F11.

Right click desktop - New - Text Document
Open it and paste

set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.­Shell")
WshShell.SendKeys "Jonesy"

Save and rename file to Jonesy.vbs
Right click jonesy.vbs and choose Properties. Set the Hotkey Property to Ctrl + Alt + F11.

Every time you press Ctrl + Alt + F11 it will type jonesy.

-
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.html
=================================================
"Jones" <jones@noreply.com> wrote in message news:d7dvoo$q68$1@news8.svr.pol.co.uk...
>
> "David Candy" <.> wrote in message
> news:ecNMiDMZFHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Create a text file and paste these lines in and name it WhateverYouWant.vbs.
> In this example it cuts and pastes between two windows. See below for
> sendkeys docs.
>
>
> set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.­Shell")
> WshShell.SendKeys "%{TAB}^c%{TAB}^v"
> [above sends Alt + Tab, Ctrl + C, Alt + Tab, then Ctrl + V]
>
>
> Then set a shortcut to the scripts (right click it and choose Copy, go to
> the Desktop, a sub folder of the desktop, or on the Start Menu somewhere
> [right click Start and choose Open] and right click a blank area and choose
> Paste Shortcut) and set a hotkey for the shortcut (see help - but right
> click shortcut and choose Properties and look on the general tab - a lot of
> keys aren't available).
>
>
> You may want to know these additional commands.
>
>
> WSHShell.Run("c:\command.exe", 0, True)
> ==============================­===
> With Param 1 being the command, Param 2 the window style (see below), and
> Param 3 a flag to indicate if to wait at this command untill the program
> started has exited - True it does and false it doesn't. Look in the
> Shortcut's Properties of the Start Menu shortcuts to see some command lines.
> You can also put document names in and have the Open command run on them.
>
>
> Window Style
> ------------------
> 0 Hides the window and activates another window.
> 1 Activates and displays a window. If the window is minimized or maximized,
> the system restores it to its original size and position. An application
> should specify this flag when displaying the window for the first time.
> 2 Activates the window and displays it as a minimized window.
> 3 Activates the window and displays it as a maximized window.
> 4 Displays a window in its most recent size and position. The active window
> remains active.
> 5 Activates the window and displays it in its current size and position.
> 6 Minimizes the specified window and activates the next top-level window in
> the Z order.
> 7 Displays the window as a minimized window. The active window remains
> active.
> 8 Displays the window in its current state. The active window remains
> active.
> 9 Activates and displays the window. If the window is minimized or
> maximized, the system restores it to its original size and position. An
> application should specify this flag when restoring a minimized window.
> 10 Sets the show-state based on the state of the program that started the
> application.
>
>
> WSHShell.AppActivate "window title"
>
>
> ==============================
>
>
> In determining which application to activate, the specified title is
> compared to the title string of each running application. If no exact match
> exists, any application whose title string begins with title is activated.
> If an application still cannot be found, any application whose title string
> ends with title is activated. If more than one instance of the application
> named by title exists, one instance is arbitrarily activated.
>
>
> Use this to switch between windows and to make sure your sendkeys go to the
> right window.
>
>
> WScript.Sleep 50
> ==============
>
>
> Sends your program to sleep for the milliseconds specified. Sometimes you
> may need to do this to give the recieving program the ability to process
> your commands (as you are blocking it from running by sending it keystrokes)
> or more frequently to give a process enough time to complete.
>
>
> SendKeys Syntax
> ==============
>
>
> Sends one or more keystrokes to the active window (as if typed on the
> keyboard).
>
>
> object.SendKeys(string)Argumen­ts
> object
> WshShell object.
> string
> String value indicating the keystroke(s) you want to send.
> Remarks
> Use the SendKeys method to send keystrokes to applications that have no
> automation interface. Most keyboard characters are represented by a single
> keystroke. Some keyboard characters are made up of combinations of
> keystrokes (CTRL+SHIFT+HOME, for example). To send a single keyboard
> character, send the character itself as the string argument. For example, to
> send the letter x, send the string argument "x".
>
>
> Note To send a space, send the string " ".
> You can use SendKeys to send more than one keystroke at a time. To do this,
> create a compound string argument that represents a sequence of keystrokes
> by appending each keystroke in the sequence to the one before it. For
> example, to send the keystrokes a, b, and c, you would send the string
> argument "abc". The SendKeys method uses some characters as modifiers of
> characters (instead of using their face-values). This set of special
> characters consists of parentheses, brackets, braces, and the:
>
>
> a.. plus sign "+",
> b.. caret "^",
> c.. percent sign "%",
> d.. and tilde "~"
> Send these characters by enclosing them within braces "{}". For example, to
> send the plus sign, send the string argument "{+}". Brackets "[ ]" have no
> special meaning when used with SendKeys, but you must enclose them within
> braces to accommodate applications that do give them a special meaning (for
> dynamic data exchange (DDE) for example).
>
>
> a.. To send bracket characters, send the string argument "{[}" for the
> left bracket and "{]}" for the right one.
> b.. To send brace characters, send the string argument "{{}" for the left
> brace and "{}}" for the right one.
> Some keystrokes do not generate characters (such as ENTER and TAB). Some
> keystrokes represent actions (such as BACKSPACE and BREAK). To send these
> kinds of keystrokes, send the arguments shown in the following table:
>
>
> Key Argument
> BACKSPACE {BACKSPACE}, {BS}, or {BKSP}
> BREAK {BREAK}
> CAPS LOCK {CAPSLOCK}
> DEL or DELETE {DELETE} or {DEL}
> DOWN ARROW {DOWN}
> END {END}
> ENTER {ENTER} or ~
> ESC {ESC}
> HELP {HELP}
> HOME {HOME}
> INS or INSERT {INSERT} or {INS}
> LEFT ARROW {LEFT}
> NUM LOCK {NUMLOCK}
> PAGE DOWN {PGDN}
> PAGE UP {PGUP}
> PRINT SCREEN {PRTSC}
> RIGHT ARROW {RIGHT}
> SCROLL LOCK {SCROLLLOCK}
> TAB {TAB}
> UP ARROW {UP}
> F1 {F1}
> F2 {F2}
> F3 {F3}
> F4 {F4}
> F5 {F5}
> F6 {F6}
> F7 {F7}
> F8 {F8}
> F9 {F9}
> F10 {F10}
> F11 {F11}
> F12 {F12}
> F13 {F13}
> F14 {F14}
> F15 {F15}
> F16 {F16}
>
>
> To send keyboard characters that are comprised of a regular keystroke in
> combination with a SHIFT, CTRL, or ALT, create a compound string argument
> that represents the keystroke combination. You do this by preceding the
> regular keystroke with one or more of the following special characters:
>
>
> Key Special Character
> SHIFT +
> CTRL ^
> ALT %
>
>
> Note When used this way, these special characters are not enclosed
> within a set of braces.
> To specify that a combination of SHIFT, CTRL, and ALT should be held down
> while several other keys are pressed, create a compound string argument with
> the modified keystrokes enclosed in parentheses. For example, to send the
> keystroke combination that specifies that the SHIFT key is held down while:
>
>
> a.. e and c are pressed, send the string argument "+(ec)".
> b.. e is pressed, followed by a lone c (with no SHIFT), send the string
> argument "+ec".
> You can use the SendKeys method to send a pattern of keystrokes that
> consists of a single keystroke pressed several times in a row. To do this,
> create a compound string argument that specifies the keystroke you want to
> repeat, followed by the number of times you want it repeated. You do this
> using a compound string argument of the form {keystroke number}. For
> example, to send the letter "x" ten times, you would send the string
> argument "{x 10}". Be sure to include a space between keystroke and number.
>
>
> Note The only keystroke pattern you can send is the kind that is
> comprised of a single keystroke pressed several times. For example, you can
> send "x" ten times, but you cannot do the same for "Ctrl+x".
> Note You cannot send the PRINT SCREEN key {PRTSC} to an application.
>
>
> Thanks Dave,
>
> My gosh! That is one of the most technical and complete answers I've ever
> recieved! You must be a technowhiz or a progrmmer, I'm not sure if that is
> at my level, I mean I think I might be a bit below that level of easy
> understanding but I'll go through it and learn something for sure. Thanks
> again for the time taken your posts really appreciated. >
>
>

frodo@theshire.org
07-09-2005, 11:51 PM
google for xp macros, there are a few free macro tools.

http://www.onlythebestfreeware.com/program.asp?program_id=141
http://www.aumha.org/free.htm

The best for-pay one is QuicKeys for Windows, $99. Can do virtually
anything, very addicting.


Does XP have any built in macro facility?