Where are Microsoft?



Eddie
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
Where are microsoft in all this?

We've all got problems and the only people we talk to are each other. By
definition, nobody here is an expert since we all ask questions. We're going
round and round in circles. How many times have you actually seen someone
ask a question and really get a good answer that actually solves the problem
for them? Usually replies just state the obvious or say that they have the
same problem.

Wouldn't it be nice to have a real MS representative to actually fix things
for us. Where are they?

Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
This is a peer to peer help newsgroup. When someone from MS does post it's
on heir own time.

--
Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
Please respond in Newsgroup. Do not send email
http://www.fjsmjs.com
Protect your PC
http://www.microsoft.com/security/protect/


"Eddie" <Eddie@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:F4C9B03D-2E94-4A8E-824E-5F3AB67ED7E6@microsoft.com...
> Where are microsoft in all this?
>
> We've all got problems and the only people we talk to are each other. By
> definition, nobody here is an expert since we all ask questions. We're
> going
> round and round in circles. How many times have you actually seen someone
> ask a question and really get a good answer that actually solves the
> problem
> for them? Usually replies just state the obvious or say that they have
> the
> same problem.
>
> Wouldn't it be nice to have a real MS representative to actually fix
> things
> for us. Where are they?

andy smart
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
Eddie wrote:
> Where are microsoft in all this?
>
> We've all got problems and the only people we talk to are each other. By
> definition, nobody here is an expert since we all ask questions. We're going
> round and round in circles. How many times have you actually seen someone
> ask a question and really get a good answer that actually solves the problem
> for them?

Loads of times actually :-)

Usually replies just state the obvious or say that they have the
> same problem.

>
> Wouldn't it be nice to have a real MS representative to actually fix things
> for us. Where are they?

Doing their jobs, re-emburse MS for their time and they'll answer your
problems.

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
"Eddie" <Eddie@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote

> Where are microsoft in all this?

"are"?
>
> We've all got problems and the only people we talk to are each other. By
> definition, nobody here is an expert since we all ask questions. We're
> going
> round and round in circles. How many times have you actually seen someone
> ask a question and really get a good answer that actually solves the
> problem
> for them?

Many times.

> Usually replies just state the obvious or say that they have the
> same problem.

Do you have a problem other than venting and revealing how wrong you are?

> Wouldn't it be nice to have a real MS representative to actually fix
> things
> for us. Where are they?

Actually, Mike Brannigan posts here and in an official capacity for MS.

So, you were wrong on both points.

Alias

Doug Knox MS-MVP
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
These are peer support newsgroups. There are Microsoft personnel that frequent them, as their work schedule allows, but this is primarily peer-to-peer support. And I'm sure if you read through this, and other newsgroups on these servers, that literally thousands of people get their problems resolved every day.

--
Doug Knox, MS-MVP Windows Media Center\Windows Powered Smart Display\Security
Win 95/98/Me/XP Tweaks and Fixes
http://www.dougknox.com
--------------------------------
Per user Group Policy Restrictions for XP Home and XP Pro
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm
--------------------------------
Please reply only to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
Unsolicited e-mail is not answered.

"Eddie" <Eddie@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:F4C9B03D-2E94-4A8E-824E-5F3AB67ED7E6@microsoft.com...
> Where are microsoft in all this?
>
> We've all got problems and the only people we talk to are each other. By
> definition, nobody here is an expert since we all ask questions. We're going
> round and round in circles. How many times have you actually seen someone
> ask a question and really get a good answer that actually solves the problem
> for them? Usually replies just state the obvious or say that they have the
> same problem.
>
> Wouldn't it be nice to have a real MS representative to actually fix things
> for us. Where are they?

Malke
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
Eddie wrote:

> Where are microsoft in all this?
>
> We've all got problems and the only people we talk to are each other.
> By
> definition, nobody here is an expert since we all ask questions.
> We're going
> round and round in circles. How many times have you actually seen
> someone ask a question and really get a good answer that actually
> solves the problem
> for them? Usually replies just state the obvious or say that they
> have the same problem.
>
> Wouldn't it be nice to have a real MS representative to actually fix
> things
> for us. Where are they?

You are misunderstanding the use of technical newsgroups, which provide
peer-to-peer support. This is not Microsoft tech support. If you want
MS tech support, call them. Be prepared to pay for their tech support,
just as you would if you called a local computer professional.

Here is information to help you better understand and use Usenet:

Since you are using the web interface, you may not realize that this is
really a newsgroup. You will get far more out of this resource if you
learn to use a newsreader. There are many good newsreaders for Windows,
but you can use Outlook Express since you already have it. Here are
some links to information about newsgroups:

http://www.elephantboycomputers.com/page3.html#12-09-02 - a brief
explanation of newsgroups
http://michaelstevenstech.com/outlookexpressnewreader.htm
http://rickrogers.org/setupoe.htm
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=/support/news/howto/default.asp
- Set Up Newsreader

http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
http://aumha.org/nntp.htm - list of MS newsgroups
microsoft.public.test.here - MS group to test if your newsreader is
working properly
http://www.mailmsg.com/SPAM_munging.htm - how to munge email address
http://www.blakjak.demon.co.uk/mul_crss.htm - multiposting vs.
crossposting

Hope that helps you with your newsgroup question. If you have a problem
with Windows XP and would like help from some of the many volunteers
who post here, then please go to the links cited above regarding
"goodpost" and "smart-questions". Then come back and post your question
with all necessary details. Or, if you are unhappy with the newsgroup,
try:

/YellowPages/Computer_Repair

Malke
--
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic!"
MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User

RA
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
Eddie wrote:
> Where are microsoft in all this?
>
> We've all got problems and the only people we talk to are each other.
> By definition, nobody here is an expert since we all ask questions.
> We're going round and round in circles. How many times have you
> actually seen someone ask a question and really get a good answer
> that actually solves the problem for them? Usually replies just
> state the obvious or say that they have the same problem.
>
> Wouldn't it be nice to have a real MS representative to actually fix
> things for us. Where are they?

You aren't reading enough posts. I have had hundreds of issues solved by
using this newsgroup and I have rarely ever posted a question. The same is
true for the Windows2000 and WindowsNT groups. I have never had to ask for
help from Microsoft. These groups have been the best help I have ever had
and it is all free. All you have to do is search and read. The best part
about the groups is that you often get different answers and you can learn
from all of them, even the wrong ones. The discussions that pop up now and
then are also very good learning tools besides being great entertainment.

Eddie
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
OK - point taken.

What does MVP mean?

Tom Pepper Willett
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
"Eddie" <Eddie@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:B4B40A1B-0514-48A4-8E87-6406D7C29517@microsoft.com...
| OK - point taken.
|
| What does MVP mean?

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
Eddie wrote:
> Where are microsoft in all this?

Hiding. This is a peer to peer help group, and MS never promised you a
Rose Garden.

>
> We've all got problems and the only people we talk to are each other.

Not true.

> By definition, nobody here is an expert since we all ask questions.

Not true. While I don't consider myself an expert, I also don't ask
tech questions about Win XP either.

> We're going round and round in circles.

Just seems that way to you. Many people get the problems resolve, and
never post back that the problem was fixed.

> How many times have you
> actually seen someone ask a question and really get a good answer
> that actually solves the problem for them?

All the time.

> Usually replies just
> state the obvious or say that they have the same problem.

Liar.

> Wouldn't it be nice to have a real MS representative to actually fix
> things for us.

No. They'd do what they do on the phone support lines. Read you KB
articles or blame some piece of hardware or software as the cause of
your problem.

> Where are they?

Didn't you hear? Bill took them all away in the MicroRapture, and only
us MicroSinners are left behind!

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
Eddie wrote:
> OK - point taken.
>
> What does MVP mean?

Monkeys on Valium or Percacet!

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Wesley Vogel
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
Hi Eddie,

MVP means Most Valuable Professional.

Some explanation...

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/

Program Summary
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/gp/mvpexecsum

Overview
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/MVPINTRO


--
Hope this helps. Let us know.

Wes
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

In news:B4B40A1B-0514-48A4-8E87-6406D7C29517@microsoft.com,
Eddie <Eddie@discussions.microsoft.com> hunted and pecked:
> OK - point taken.
>
> What does MVP mean?

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
"Wesley Vogel" <123WVogel955@comcast.net> wrote

> Hi Eddie,
>
> MVP means Most Valuable Professional.

As compared to Least Valuable Professional?

Alias

Steve Shattuck
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
> Where are microsoft in all this?

Not here, this is a peer-to-peer support group. When there is an
occassional post from an MS employee, it is on their own time.

> We've all got problems and the only people we talk to are each other. By
> definition, nobody here is an expert since we all ask questions.

That indicates a gross lack of knowledge about this newsgroup. There are
many people here that are not only experts, but spend time here soley to
help others. On a scale of 1 to 10, this newgroup is at least a 9, as good
as calling Microsoft support, and IMHO even better. Instead of remaining in
the dark, try reading some of the replies, especially those that point to
websites that include support information that exceeds help available
anywhere else. I especially recommend Kelly's XP Korner
(http://www.kellys-korner-xp.com/xp.htm) and Doug Knox's XP site
(http://www.dougknox.com/). These are but two of a number of support sites
you would do well exploring before assuming that everyone here is as
un-expert as yourself.

> We're going
> round and round in circles. How many times have you actually seen someone
> ask a question and really get a good answer that actually solves the
> problem
> for them? Usually replies just state the obvious or say that they have
> the
> same problem.

There are two responses to this absurd remark. First of all, 1000's of
people get answers here every day that solve their problems, many who "lurk"
here and just learn by reading. The second point is that people ask the
same question over and over again because they haven't learned to search
Google or the newsgroup for answers before posting the same question that
has been answered over and over ad nausium.

> Wouldn't it be nice to have a real MS representative to actually fix
> things
> for us. Where are they?

It would be wonderful if Microsoft could only sell their products to people
with a tiny amount of intelligence, but alas they can't. As a wise man
once said, "Better to sit silently and have people think you're an idiot
than to open your mouth and remove all doubt." Now that you have made a
fool of yourself, start over, read, learn and benefit from perhaps the best
peer-to-peer support newsgroup on the Internet.

--
..__
(__
__ )teve www.steve.shattuck.net steve@shattuck.net

Donald McDaniel
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
On Tue, 24 May 2005 06:28:04 -0700, "Eddie"
<Eddie@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>Where are microsoft in all this?
>
Were you aware that when using corporate words( such as the name of a
company like Microsoft) you use singular verbs, as in
"Where IS Microsoft in all this?"

This is common grammatical practice in the United States. The use of
plural verbs with corporate entities seems to happen mostly with young
people who were not properly trained in the use of American English.
It also seems to happen mostly with those who write in British English
and among Europeans who write in British English.

I am so tired of reading these Britishisms here in the United States.
Personally, I believe that even the British didn't get taught to use
plural verbs with corporate entities.

This only seems to have started happening in the last few years. Some
unlearned person saw another unlearned person they respected use a
plural verb with a corporate entity, and repeated the mistake over and
over. Now everyone seems to be doing it.

Donald L McDaniel
Please reply to the original thread
so that others may be instructed or informed
============================================

Wesley Vogel
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
LVP. Is that the award that you received? ;-)

--
Hope this helps. Let us know.

Wes
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

In news:eYC%23ANHYFHA.3184@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
Alias <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> hunted and pecked:
> "Wesley Vogel" <123WVogel955@comcast.net> wrote
>
>> Hi Eddie,
>>
>> MVP means Most Valuable Professional.
>
> As compared to Least Valuable Professional?
>
> Alias

NoNoBadDog!
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
This is a peer level support group. Its only connection to Microsoft is
that it happens to reside on a server provided by them. Occasssionally,
someone from Microsoft will post in these groups. In addition, MVP's are
usually active in this group. Microsoft is in no way obligated to provide
any direct support in these newsgroups.
If you are not getting the answers you need here, it could be due to many
reasons. Perhaps no one has an answer for your particular question.
Perhaps you did not clearly state your question, therefore it was not
clearly understood and was not answered.

In any case, your post only served to let you vent. If you are not
satisfied with the level of support you are getting here, then you must
exercise your other options.

Bobby

"Eddie" <Eddie@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:F4C9B03D-2E94-4A8E-824E-5F3AB67ED7E6@microsoft.com...
> Where are microsoft in all this?
>
> We've all got problems and the only people we talk to are each other. By
> definition, nobody here is an expert since we all ask questions. We're
> going
> round and round in circles. How many times have you actually seen someone
> ask a question and really get a good answer that actually solves the
> problem
> for them? Usually replies just state the obvious or say that they have
> the
> same problem.
>
> Wouldn't it be nice to have a real MS representative to actually fix
> things
> for us. Where are they?

Opinicus
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
"Donald McDaniel" <dlmcdaniel2005@yahoo.com> wrote

> This is common grammatical practice in the United States.

Where I, and probably the majority of people reading your
little rant, are not.

> I am so tired of reading these Britishisms here in the
> United States.
> Personally, I believe that even the British didn't get
> taught to use
> plural verbs with corporate entities.

"The family are taking separate vacations this year."

Try saying that as succinctly in America-speak.

--
Bob, who was born and bred in the USA but who thinks that BE
is cool too because they spell "traveling" with one "l".

Kanyak's Doghouse
http://www.kanyak.com

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
Donald McDaniel wrote:
> On Tue, 24 May 2005 06:28:04 -0700, "Eddie"
> <Eddie@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
>
>> Where are microsoft in all this?
>>
> Were you aware that when using corporate words( such as the name of a
> company like Microsoft) you use singular verbs, as in
> "Where IS Microsoft in all this?"
>
> This is common grammatical practice in the United States. The use of
> plural verbs with corporate entities seems to happen mostly with young
> people who were not properly trained in the use of American English.
> It also seems to happen mostly with those who write in British English
> and among Europeans who write in British English.
>
> I am so tired of reading these Britishisms here in the United States.
> Personally, I believe that even the British didn't get taught to use
> plural verbs with corporate entities.
>
> This only seems to have started happening in the last few years. Some
> unlearned person saw another unlearned person they respected use a
> plural verb with a corporate entity, and repeated the mistake over and
> over. Now everyone seems to be doing it.

Grammar-laming is worse than spell-laming. This ain't no grammar bee.

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Jon
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
Microsoft representatives in the last 2 weeks (in reverse order of
appearance)......

Ken Zhao

Mike Brannigan

Vincent Xu

John Eddy

Jacky Gu

Darrell Gorter

Taimur Mughal

Amanda Wang

Tristan Wang


"Eddie" <Eddie@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:F4C9B03D-2E94-4A8E-824E-5F3AB67ED7E6@microsoft.com...
> Where are microsoft in all this?
>
> We've all got problems and the only people we talk to are each other. By
> definition, nobody here is an expert since we all ask questions. We're
> going
> round and round in circles. How many times have you actually seen someone
> ask a question and really get a good answer that actually solves the
> problem
> for them? Usually replies just state the obvious or say that they have
> the
> same problem.
>
> Wouldn't it be nice to have a real MS representative to actually fix
> things
> for us. Where are they?

Eddie
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
I humbly apologise without reservation to all concerned.
E

Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
"kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in
message news:%23F19RDHYFHA.1148@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl
> Eddie wrote:
>> OK - point taken.
>>
>> What does MVP mean?
>
> Monkeys on Valium or Percacet!

Nah, I'm on Wellbutrin.

--
Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
Please respond in Newsgroup. Do not send email
http://www.fjsmjs.com
Protect your PC
http://www.microsoft.com/security/protect/

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:42 PM
Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE wrote:
> "kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in
> message news:%23F19RDHYFHA.1148@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl
>> Eddie wrote:
>>> OK - point taken.
>>>
>>> What does MVP mean?
>>
>> Monkeys on Valium or Percacet!
>
> Nah, I'm on Wellbutrin.

"There is a risk of seizure when taking WELLBUTRIN XL, so don't use . .
.. . if you abruply stop using alcohol or sedatives." -
http://www.wellbutrin-xl.com/

So remember to keep up your intake of beer and sedatives!

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:43 PM
I am not interested in awards. Being alive is enough award for me.

Alias

"Wesley Vogel" <123WVogel955@comcast.net> wrote

> LVP. Is that the award that you received? ;-)
>
> --
> Hope this helps. Let us know.
>
> Wes
> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>
> In news:eYC%23ANHYFHA.3184@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
> Alias <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> hunted and pecked:
>> "Wesley Vogel" <123WVogel955@comcast.net> wrote
>>
>>> Hi Eddie,
>>>
>>> MVP means Most Valuable Professional.
>>
>> As compared to Least Valuable Professional?
>>
>> Alias

Wesley Vogel
07-09-2005, 11:43 PM
Congratulations then!

--
Hope this helps. Let us know.

Wes
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

In news:%23kU$RaLYFHA.2796@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
Alias <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> hunted and pecked:
> I am not interested in awards. Being alive is enough award for me.
>
> Alias
>
> "Wesley Vogel" <123WVogel955@comcast.net> wrote
>
>> LVP. Is that the award that you received? ;-)
>>
>> --
>> Hope this helps. Let us know.
>>
>> Wes
>> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>>
>> In news:eYC%23ANHYFHA.3184@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
>> Alias <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> hunted and pecked:
>>> "Wesley Vogel" <123WVogel955@comcast.net> wrote
>>>
>>>> Hi Eddie,
>>>>
>>>> MVP means Most Valuable Professional.
>>>
>>> As compared to Least Valuable Professional?
>>>
>>> Alias

NobodyMan
07-09-2005, 11:43 PM
On Tue, 24 May 2005 22:11:45 +0300, "Opinicus" <gezgin@spamcop.net>
wrote:

>"Donald McDaniel" <dlmcdaniel2005@yahoo.com> wrote
>
>> This is common grammatical practice in the United States.
>
>Where I, and probably the majority of people reading your
>little rant, are not.
>
>> I am so tired of reading these Britishisms here in the
>> United States.
>> Personally, I believe that even the British didn't get
>> taught to use
>> plural verbs with corporate entities.
>
>"The family are taking separate vacations this year."
>
>Try saying that as succinctly in America-speak.

Not the same. "Microsoft" implies ONE corporate entity. In your
example, "family" has plural "vacations" indicating that family is to
be thought of in the mutliple sense (each individual) and not as a
complete single entity.

Hence, your would refer to MS as a single entity, while in your
example, the family vacations would be plural. Both were correct.

Richard Urban
07-09-2005, 11:43 PM
That's for sure. Just read the posts and you can see the lack of education
exhibited on the part of a vast number of participants!

--
Regards,

Richard Urban

aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

If you knew as much as you think you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


"kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in message
news:ORtnuXJYFHA.3164@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Donald McDaniel wrote:
>> On Tue, 24 May 2005 06:28:04 -0700, "Eddie"
>> <Eddie@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Where are microsoft in all this?
>>>
>> Were you aware that when using corporate words( such as the name of a
>> company like Microsoft) you use singular verbs, as in
>> "Where IS Microsoft in all this?"
>>
>> This is common grammatical practice in the United States. The use of
>> plural verbs with corporate entities seems to happen mostly with young
>> people who were not properly trained in the use of American English.
>> It also seems to happen mostly with those who write in British English
>> and among Europeans who write in British English.
>>
>> I am so tired of reading these Britishisms here in the United States.
>> Personally, I believe that even the British didn't get taught to use
>> plural verbs with corporate entities.
>>
>> This only seems to have started happening in the last few years. Some
>> unlearned person saw another unlearned person they respected use a
>> plural verb with a corporate entity, and repeated the mistake over and
>> over. Now everyone seems to be doing it.
>
> Grammar-laming is worse than spell-laming. This ain't no grammar bee.
>
> --
> Peace!
> Kurt
> Self-anointed Moderator
> microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
> http://microscum.com/mscommunity
> "Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
> "Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"
>

andy smart
07-09-2005, 11:43 PM
Donald McDaniel wrote:
> On Tue, 24 May 2005 06:28:04 -0700, "Eddie"
> <Eddie@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Where are microsoft in all this?
>>
>
> Were you aware that when using corporate words( such as the name of a
> company like Microsoft) you use singular verbs, as in
> "Where IS Microsoft in all this?"
>
> This is common grammatical practice in the United States. The use of
> plural verbs with corporate entities seems to happen mostly with young
> people who were not properly trained in the use of American English.
> It also seems to happen mostly with those who write in British English
> and among Europeans who write in British English.
>
> I am so tired of reading these Britishisms here in the United States.
> Personally, I believe that even the British didn't get taught to use
> plural verbs with corporate entities.
>
> This only seems to have started happening in the last few years. Some
> unlearned person saw another unlearned person they respected use a
> plural verb with a corporate entity, and repeated the mistake over and
> over. Now everyone seems to be doing it.
>
> Donald L McDaniel
> Please reply to the original thread
> so that others may be instructed or informed
> ============================================

Don't bother reading if you're going to take it in anything other than
the light-hearted spirit in which it is intended.

As somebody who speaks English (as opposed to this thing called
'International English') I can confirm that this is not a case of it
being a 'Britishism' to use your rather interesting newly created word.

I can vouch for the fact that on the whole we in Britain hold grammar
use in high esteem, however there are developing trends in grammar use
when discussing organizations which are altering accpeted use in certain
cirumstances. Among organizations many have house rules regarding the
use of the corporate name. For example organizations which are known by
their intitial letters often decide to remove 'the' from in front of the
name; to pick a fictitious example The Carrot Marketing Board might well
decide to always be known as 'CMB' not 'The CMB'. You might argue that
when dealing with an organization as large as Microsoft, with its many
different divisions, that it is in fact a plural entity: there is
nothing called 'a Microsoft', or indeed 'the Microsoft' but rather the
people who work for Microsoft therefore with an elegant inevitablility
one might suggest that it is in fact more incorrect to use a singular
verb for what is obviously a mulitple entity.

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:43 PM
Alias wrote:


<snip>

> Lastly, when will the British learn how to pronounce "aluminium"
> correctly?

You should hear me butcher the pronounciation of it!

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:43 PM
"kurttrail" wrote

> Alias wrote:
>
>
> <snip>
>
>> Lastly, when will the British learn how to pronounce "aluminium"
>> correctly?
>
> You should hear me butcher the pronounciation of it!
>
> --
> Peace!
> Kurt

Why, are you from Dixie?

Alias

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:43 PM
Alias wrote:
> "kurttrail" wrote
>
>> Alias wrote:
>>
>>
>> <snip>
>>
>>> Lastly, when will the British learn how to pronounce "aluminium"
>>> correctly?
>>
>> You should hear me butcher the pronounciation of it!
>>
>> --
>> Peace!
>> Kurt
>
> Why, are you from Dixie?
>
> Alias

I was born in Nevada, raised in th NY/NJ Metro Area, and now I live
south FL. I just always had a mental block or a speech impediment when
it to that word.

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Donald McDaniel
07-09-2005, 11:43 PM
On Tue, 24 May 2005 22:11:45 +0300, "Opinicus" <gezgin@spamcop.net>
wrote:

>"Donald McDaniel" <dlmcdaniel2005@yahoo.com> wrote
>
>> This is common grammatical practice in the United States.
>
>Where I, and probably the majority of people reading your
>little rant, are not.
>
>> I am so tired of reading these Britishisms here in the
>> United States.
>> Personally, I believe that even the British didn't get
>> taught to use
>> plural verbs with corporate entities.
>
>"The family are taking separate vacations this year."
>
>Try saying that as succinctly in America-speak.

Who said that the American brand of English is consistent?
The instance you have chosen is an exception to the general rule of
using singular verbs with corporate entities. Perhaps the sentence
would have been better crafted if you had written "The family members
are each taking separate vacations this year".

However, using singular verbs with corporate entities is a
well-established grammatical construction in the United States.

I especially remember an English Composition class in which the
teacher specifically taught that singular verbs are to always be used
when applying them to the names of corporations.

Donald L McDaniel
Please reply to the original thread
so that others may be instructed or informed
============================================

Donald McDaniel
07-09-2005, 11:44 PM
On Tue, 24 May 2005 15:00:03 -0700, "Eddie"
<Eddie@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>I humbly apologise without reservation to all concerned.
>E
It's all in fun, Eddie.
By the way, only the Queen of England and her subjects spell
"apologize" with an "s" rather than a "z".
Donald L McDaniel
Please reply to the original thread
so that others may be instructed or informed
============================================

Ken Blake
07-09-2005, 11:44 PM
In news:%23ShaUFTYFHA.3220@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl,
Alias <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> typed:

>> So what is the English word which is pronounced differently
>> when
>> capitalised?
>
> Let's see if anyone knows.


Polish, polish.


--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:44 PM
Drum roll ....

We have a winner!

Alias

"Ken Blake" wrote

> Alias typed:
>
>>> So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
>>> capitalised?
>>
>> Let's see if anyone knows.
>
>
> Polish, polish.
>
>
> --
> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
> Please reply to the newsgroup

Jon
07-09-2005, 11:44 PM
But don't get confused if some asks you to

"Polish the Polish table, please!"

Jon

"Alias" <aka@[notme]maskedandanonymous.org> wrote in message
news:e4RDoYVYFHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Drum roll ....
>
> We have a winner!
>
> Alias
>
> "Ken Blake" wrote
>
>> Alias typed:
>>
>>>> So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
>>>> capitalised?
>>>
>>> Let's see if anyone knows.
>>
>>
>> Polish, polish.
>>
>>
>> --
>> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>> Please reply to the newsgroup
>
>

Bob I
07-09-2005, 11:44 PM
And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your shoes."
Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because CAPITALIZATION DOES
NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a proper noun and a verb is NOT
the same word, merely the same letter combination. English teacher??

Alias wrote:

> Drum roll ....
>
> We have a winner!
>
> Alias
>
> "Ken Blake" wrote
>
>
>>Alias typed:
>>
>>
>>>>So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
>>>>capitalised?
>>>
>>>Let's see if anyone knows.
>>
>>
>>Polish, polish.
>>
>>
>>--
>>Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>Please reply to the newsgroup
>
>
>

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:44 PM
Bob I wrote:
> And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your shoes."
> Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because CAPITALIZATION
> DOES NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a proper noun and a verb
> is NOT the same word, merely the same letter combination. English
> teacher??

Yet another anal retentive heard from.

If you can't make fun of it, at least don't take it so seriously. There
are too many illiterate people in the world to get your blood pressure
up over grammatical rules.

Want to get worked up over something? Let's see you speak out against
the US government dancing on the grave of Human Rights!

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Tom Porterfield
07-09-2005, 11:44 PM
kurttrail wrote:
> Want to get worked up over something? Let's see you speak out against
> the US government dancing on the grave of Human Rights!

What are you on about? http://web.amnesty.org/report2005/usa-summary-eng
(ohhh).
--
Tom Porterfield

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:44 PM
Tom Porterfield wrote:
> kurttrail wrote:
>> Want to get worked up over something? Let's see you speak out
>> against the US government dancing on the grave of Human Rights!
>
> What are you on about?
> http://web.amnesty.org/report2005/usa-summary-eng (ohhh).

Ohhh, indeed!

And here is a excellent story on "extraordinary rendition" by the CIA.
It almost reads like an old spy novel about the KBG. And this is just
one instance that has come to light, who knows how many times hooded CIA
agents have whisked people away in the dead of night. Supposedly, the
CIA has been doing this for years!

Bad grammar is the least of the world's problems. I sure as hell rather
have and read bad grammar than live in the Sudan!

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Opinicus
07-09-2005, 11:44 PM
"andy smart" <anonymus@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote
> kurttrail wrote:

>> Actually, you could have got a really 'good' semi-colon
>> in there after
> the first 'elsewhere' - in fact given the highly emphatic
> nature of your
> comment you could even have validly used a full colon!
>
> "...... grammar lesson elsewhere: this ain't the ...."
>

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:44 PM
I should have said "always capitalized", as in someone from Poland, you
moron.

Alias
"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote

> And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your shoes."
> Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because CAPITALIZATION DOES
> NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a proper noun and a verb is NOT
> the same word, merely the same letter combination. English teacher??
>
> Alias wrote:
>
>> Drum roll ....
>>
>> We have a winner!
>>
>> Alias
>>
>> "Ken Blake" wrote
>>
>>
>>>Alias typed:
>>>
>>>
>>>>>So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
>>>>>capitalised?
>>>>
>>>>Let's see if anyone knows.
>>>
>>>
>>>Polish, polish.
>>>
>>>
>>>--
>>>Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>>Please reply to the newsgroup
>>
>>
>>
>

Michael Stevens
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
"kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in message
news:%23F19RDHYFHA.1148@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Eddie wrote:
>> OK - point taken.
>>
>> What does MVP mean?
>
> Monkeys on Valium or Percacet!
>
> --
> Peace!
> Kurt
> Self-anointed Moderator
> microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
> http://microscum.com/mscommunity
> "Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
> "Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"
>

Totally without humor rebuttal answer.
"Microsoft Most Valuable Professional"
Humor intended reply rebuttal
"Kurt is a total putz 8-) and if his idealogy shifted a hair toward
realistic he would fulfill all the requirments necessary for being awarded
the MS-MVP award. He secretly habours a jealous rage about this. LOL The one
thing you can always be assured, he will never always be nice, completlely
wrong, or shy away from annaliatiung a newbie that makes stupid replies.
Take Kurt's advice as his advice.......Please don't take his word as if it
was a LAW!!" <VBG>
--
Michael Stevens MS-MVP XP
xpnews@bogusmichaelstevenstech.com
http://www.michaelstevenstech.com
For a better newsgroup experience. Setup a newsreader.
http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/outlookexpressnewreader.htm

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
Michael Stevens wrote:
> "kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in
> message news:%23F19RDHYFHA.1148@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> Eddie wrote:
>>> OK - point taken.
>>>
>>> What does MVP mean?
>>
>> Monkeys on Valium or Percacet!
>>
>
> Totally without humor rebuttal answer.
> "Microsoft Most Valuable Professional"

You know I was joking, right? It just seems the acronym MVP is pretty
universal,

Most Valuable P...
Player.
Person.
And in this case Professional.

I would think that some of these people asking would acknowledge that
the first two letters and just ask what does the "P" stand for in MVP?

> Humor intended reply rebuttal
> "Kurt is a total putz 8-) and if his idealogy shifted a hair toward
> realistic he would fulfill all the requirments necessary for being
> awarded the MS-MVP award. He secretly habours a jealous rage about
> this. LOL The one thing you can always be assured, he will never
> always be nice, completlely wrong, or shy away from annaliatiung a
> newbie that makes stupid replies. Take Kurt's advice as his
> advice.......Please don't take his word as if it was a LAW!!" <VBG>

LOL! Who are you quoting? Yourself?

I'll go it alone, that's how it must be
I can't be right for somebody else
If I'm not right for me
I gotta be free, I just gotta be free
Daring to try, to do it or die
I gotta be me

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Bob I
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
Sorry about the problems you are having with the language. IF ONE is
attempting to create a riddle, then one needs to make sure the rules fit
the answer. Of course since I know this, and am a "moron" but you
apparently don't, just where does that put you???

Alias wrote:

> I should have said "always capitalized", as in someone from Poland, you
> moron.
>
> Alias
> "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>
>
>>And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your shoes."
>>Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because CAPITALIZATION DOES
>>NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a proper noun and a verb is NOT
>>the same word, merely the same letter combination. English teacher??
>>
>>Alias wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Drum roll ....
>>>
>>>We have a winner!
>>>
>>>Alias
>>>
>>>"Ken Blake" wrote
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>Alias typed:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>>So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
>>>>>>capitalised?
>>>>>
>>>>>Let's see if anyone knows.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Polish, polish.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>--
>>>>Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>>>Please reply to the newsgroup
>>>
>>>
>>>
>
>

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
Do you know the answer to the other question? My forgetting to say "always
capitilized" was just an error on my part, not an indication that I don't
know the language.

Alias

"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote

> Sorry about the problems you are having with the language. IF ONE is
> attempting to create a riddle, then one needs to make sure the rules fit
> the answer. Of course since I know this, and am a "moron" but you
> apparently don't, just where does that put you???
>
> Alias wrote:
>
>> I should have said "always capitalized", as in someone from Poland, you
>> moron.
>>
>> Alias
>> "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>
>>
>>>And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your shoes."
>>>Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because CAPITALIZATION DOES
>>>NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a proper noun and a verb is NOT
>>>the same word, merely the same letter combination. English teacher??
>>>
>>>Alias wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Drum roll ....
>>>>
>>>>We have a winner!
>>>>
>>>>Alias
>>>>
>>>>"Ken Blake" wrote
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Alias typed:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>>So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
>>>>>>>capitalised?
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Let's see if anyone knows.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>Polish, polish.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>--
>>>>>Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>>>>Please reply to the newsgroup
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>
>>
>

Bob I
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
The using A or AN question, or the "funny" way Brits say aluminum?

Guessing the first, and I've always used the "sounds odd method" of
determining use. But from what I remember, if an "A" or an "AN" is used,
then "a" gets used in front of everything but words starting with a, e,
i and o, in which case "AN" would be used.

Alias wrote:

> Do you know the answer to the other question? My forgetting to say "always
> capitilized" was just an error on my part, not an indication that I don't
> know the language.
>
> Alias
>
> "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>
>
>>Sorry about the problems you are having with the language. IF ONE is
>>attempting to create a riddle, then one needs to make sure the rules fit
>>the answer. Of course since I know this, and am a "moron" but you
>>apparently don't, just where does that put you???
>>
>>Alias wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I should have said "always capitalized", as in someone from Poland, you
>>>moron.
>>>
>>>Alias
>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your shoes."
>>>>Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because CAPITALIZATION DOES
>>>>NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a proper noun and a verb is NOT
>>>>the same word, merely the same letter combination. English teacher??
>>>>
>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Drum roll ....
>>>>>
>>>>>We have a winner!
>>>>>
>>>>>Alias
>>>>>
>>>>>"Ken Blake" wrote
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Alias typed:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
>>>>>>>>capitalised?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Let's see if anyone knows.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Polish, polish.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>--
>>>>>>Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>>>>>Please reply to the newsgroup
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>
>
>

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
How about, a university? an hour?

Alias

"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:uJ40GUhYFHA.3220@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> The using A or AN question, or the "funny" way Brits say aluminum?
>
> Guessing the first, and I've always used the "sounds odd method" of
> determining use. But from what I remember, if an "A" or an "AN" is used,
> then "a" gets used in front of everything but words starting with a, e, i
> and o, in which case "AN" would be used.
>
> Alias wrote:
>
>> Do you know the answer to the other question? My forgetting to say
>> "always capitilized" was just an error on my part, not an indication that
>> I don't know the language.
>>
>> Alias
>>
>> "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>
>>
>>>Sorry about the problems you are having with the language. IF ONE is
>>>attempting to create a riddle, then one needs to make sure the rules fit
>>>the answer. Of course since I know this, and am a "moron" but you
>>>apparently don't, just where does that put you???
>>>
>>>Alias wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>I should have said "always capitalized", as in someone from Poland, you
>>>>moron.
>>>>
>>>>Alias
>>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your shoes."
>>>>>Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because CAPITALIZATION
>>>>>DOES NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a proper noun and a verb
>>>>>is NOT the same word, merely the same letter combination. English
>>>>>teacher??
>>>>>
>>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Drum roll ....
>>>>>>
>>>>>>We have a winner!
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Alias
>>>>>>
>>>>>>"Ken Blake" wrote
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Alias typed:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
>>>>>>>>>capitalised?
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Let's see if anyone knows.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Polish, polish.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>--
>>>>>>>Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>>>>>>Please reply to the newsgroup
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>
>>
>>
>

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
> "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote

> or the "funny" way Brits say aluminum?

That reminds me of a Scottish friend I used to know. I am American (USA) and
both of us speak fluent Spanish. He could understand my English perfectly
due to the fact that he watched American TV shows and Hollywood produced
movies (films) all his life. I couldn't understand his English at all so he
would speak Spanish and I would speak English and we understood each other
perfectly.

Alias

Bob I
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
That would be the "sounds odd method" I mentioned. I left "u" out of the
list you noticed, but you have an Uncle at a University, and the h is
silent in an Hour so the "oh" or "uh" sounds are the trigger.

Alias wrote:

> How about, a university? an hour?
>
> Alias
>
> "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:uJ40GUhYFHA.3220@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>
>>The using A or AN question, or the "funny" way Brits say aluminum?
>>
>>Guessing the first, and I've always used the "sounds odd method" of
>>determining use. But from what I remember, if an "A" or an "AN" is used,
>>then "a" gets used in front of everything but words starting with a, e, i
>>and o, in which case "AN" would be used.
>>
>>Alias wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Do you know the answer to the other question? My forgetting to say
>>>"always capitilized" was just an error on my part, not an indication that
>>>I don't know the language.
>>>
>>>Alias
>>>
>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>Sorry about the problems you are having with the language. IF ONE is
>>>>attempting to create a riddle, then one needs to make sure the rules fit
>>>>the answer. Of course since I know this, and am a "moron" but you
>>>>apparently don't, just where does that put you???
>>>>
>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I should have said "always capitalized", as in someone from Poland, you
>>>>>moron.
>>>>>
>>>>>Alias
>>>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your shoes."
>>>>>>Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because CAPITALIZATION
>>>>>>DOES NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a proper noun and a verb
>>>>>>is NOT the same word, merely the same letter combination. English
>>>>>>teacher??
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Drum roll ....
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>We have a winner!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Alias
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>"Ken Blake" wrote
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Alias typed:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
>>>>>>>>>>capitalised?
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>Let's see if anyone knows.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Polish, polish.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>--
>>>>>>>>Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>>>>>>>Please reply to the newsgroup
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>
>
>

David Candy
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
Would it be a mvp or an mvcp and M starts with E if spelt..
"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:uJ40GUhYFHA.3220@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> The using A or AN question, or the "funny" way Brits say aluminum?
>
> Guessing the first, and I've always used the "sounds odd method" of
> determining use. But from what I remember, if an "A" or an "AN" is used,
> then "a" gets used in front of everything but words starting with a, e,
> i and o, in which case "AN" would be used.
>
> Alias wrote:
>
> > Do you know the answer to the other question? My forgetting to say
"always
> > capitilized" was just an error on my part, not an indication that I
don't
> > know the language.
> >
> > Alias
> >
> > "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
> >
> >
> >>Sorry about the problems you are having with the language. IF ONE is
> >>attempting to create a riddle, then one needs to make sure the rules fit
> >>the answer. Of course since I know this, and am a "moron" but you
> >>apparently don't, just where does that put you???
> >>
> >>Alias wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>I should have said "always capitalized", as in someone from Poland, you
> >>>moron.
> >>>
> >>>Alias
> >>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>>And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your shoes."
> >>>>Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because CAPITALIZATION
DOES
> >>>>NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a proper noun and a verb is
NOT
> >>>>the same word, merely the same letter combination. English teacher??
> >>>>
> >>>>Alias wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>>Drum roll ....
> >>>>>
> >>>>>We have a winner!
> >>>>>
> >>>>>Alias
> >>>>>
> >>>>>"Ken Blake" wrote
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>>Alias typed:
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
> >>>>>>>>capitalised?
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>Let's see if anyone knows.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>Polish, polish.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>--
> >>>>>>Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
> >>>>>>Please reply to the newsgroup
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>
> >
> >
>

Bob I
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
Yep, you got it. If it sounds odd it must be the other one! :-)

David Candy wrote:

> Would it be a mvp or an mvcp and M starts with E if spelt..
> "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:uJ40GUhYFHA.3220@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>
>>The using A or AN question, or the "funny" way Brits say aluminum?
>>
>>Guessing the first, and I've always used the "sounds odd method" of
>>determining use. But from what I remember, if an "A" or an "AN" is used,
>>then "a" gets used in front of everything but words starting with a, e,
>>i and o, in which case "AN" would be used.
>>
>>Alias wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Do you know the answer to the other question? My forgetting to say
>
> "always
>
>>>capitilized" was just an error on my part, not an indication that I
>
> don't
>
>>>know the language.
>>>
>>>Alias
>>>
>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>Sorry about the problems you are having with the language. IF ONE is
>>>>attempting to create a riddle, then one needs to make sure the rules fit
>>>>the answer. Of course since I know this, and am a "moron" but you
>>>>apparently don't, just where does that put you???
>>>>
>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I should have said "always capitalized", as in someone from Poland, you
>>>>>moron.
>>>>>
>>>>>Alias
>>>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your shoes."
>>>>>>Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because CAPITALIZATION
>
> DOES
>
>>>>>>NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a proper noun and a verb is
>
> NOT
>
>>>>>>the same word, merely the same letter combination. English teacher??
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Drum roll ....
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>We have a winner!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Alias
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>"Ken Blake" wrote
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Alias typed:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
>>>>>>>>>>capitalised?
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>Let's see if anyone knows.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Polish, polish.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>--
>>>>>>>>Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>>>>>>>Please reply to the newsgroup
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>
>
>

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
The answer isn't "sounds odd". The answer is when a word begins with the
sound of a vowel, one uses "an". When a word begins with the sound of a
consonant, one uses "a".

"Sounds odd" would only work with natives who have always heard it used
correctly.

Alias

"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote

> That would be the "sounds odd method" I mentioned. I left "u" out of the
> list you noticed, but you have an Uncle at a University, and the h is
> silent in an Hour so the "oh" or "uh" sounds are the trigger.
>
> Alias wrote:
>
>> How about, a university? an hour?
>>
>> Alias
>>
>> "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:uJ40GUhYFHA.3220@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>
>>>The using A or AN question, or the "funny" way Brits say aluminum?
>>>
>>>Guessing the first, and I've always used the "sounds odd method" of
>>>determining use. But from what I remember, if an "A" or an "AN" is used,
>>>then "a" gets used in front of everything but words starting with a, e, i
>>>and o, in which case "AN" would be used.
>>>
>>>Alias wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Do you know the answer to the other question? My forgetting to say
>>>>"always capitilized" was just an error on my part, not an indication
>>>>that I don't know the language.
>>>>
>>>>Alias
>>>>
>>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Sorry about the problems you are having with the language. IF ONE is
>>>>>attempting to create a riddle, then one needs to make sure the rules
>>>>>fit the answer. Of course since I know this, and am a "moron" but you
>>>>>apparently don't, just where does that put you???
>>>>>
>>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>I should have said "always capitalized", as in someone from Poland,
>>>>>>you moron.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Alias
>>>>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your
>>>>>>>shoes." Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because
>>>>>>>CAPITALIZATION DOES NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a proper
>>>>>>>noun and a verb is NOT the same word, merely the same letter
>>>>>>>combination. English teacher??
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Drum roll ....
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>We have a winner!
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Alias
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>"Ken Blake" wrote
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>Alias typed:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
>>>>>>>>>>>capitalised?
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>Let's see if anyone knows.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>Polish, polish.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>--
>>>>>>>>>Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>>>>>>>>Please reply to the newsgroup
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>
>>
>>
>

Bob I
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
Since university starts with a vowel sound, it's an exception.

Alias wrote:

> The answer isn't "sounds odd". The answer is when a word begins with the
> sound of a vowel, one uses "an". When a word begins with the sound of a
> consonant, one uses "a".
>
> "Sounds odd" would only work with natives who have always heard it used
> correctly.
>
> Alias
>
> "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>
>
>>That would be the "sounds odd method" I mentioned. I left "u" out of the
>>list you noticed, but you have an Uncle at a University, and the h is
>>silent in an Hour so the "oh" or "uh" sounds are the trigger.
>>
>>Alias wrote:
>>
>>
>>>How about, a university? an hour?
>>>
>>>Alias
>>>
>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>>>news:uJ40GUhYFHA.3220@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>
>>>
>>>>The using A or AN question, or the "funny" way Brits say aluminum?
>>>>
>>>>Guessing the first, and I've always used the "sounds odd method" of
>>>>determining use. But from what I remember, if an "A" or an "AN" is used,
>>>>then "a" gets used in front of everything but words starting with a, e, i
>>>>and o, in which case "AN" would be used.
>>>>
>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Do you know the answer to the other question? My forgetting to say
>>>>>"always capitilized" was just an error on my part, not an indication
>>>>>that I don't know the language.
>>>>>
>>>>>Alias
>>>>>
>>>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Sorry about the problems you are having with the language. IF ONE is
>>>>>>attempting to create a riddle, then one needs to make sure the rules
>>>>>>fit the answer. Of course since I know this, and am a "moron" but you
>>>>>>apparently don't, just where does that put you???
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>I should have said "always capitalized", as in someone from Poland,
>>>>>>>you moron.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Alias
>>>>>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your
>>>>>>>>shoes." Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because
>>>>>>>>CAPITALIZATION DOES NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a proper
>>>>>>>>noun and a verb is NOT the same word, merely the same letter
>>>>>>>>combination. English teacher??
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>Drum roll ....
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>We have a winner!
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>Alias
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>"Ken Blake" wrote
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>Alias typed:
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>>So what is the English word which is pronounced differently when
>>>>>>>>>>>>capitalised?
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>Let's see if anyone knows.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>Polish, polish.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>--
>>>>>>>>>>Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>>>>>>>>>Please reply to the newsgroup
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>
>
>

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
No, it doesn't. It's pronounced youniversity.

Alias

"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote

> Since university starts with a vowel sound, it's an exception.
>
> Alias wrote:
>
>> The answer isn't "sounds odd". The answer is when a word begins with the
>> sound of a vowel, one uses "an". When a word begins with the sound of a
>> consonant, one uses "a".
>>
>> "Sounds odd" would only work with natives who have always heard it used
>> correctly.
>>
>> Alias
>>
>> "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>
>>
>>>That would be the "sounds odd method" I mentioned. I left "u" out of the
>>>list you noticed, but you have an Uncle at a University, and the h is
>>>silent in an Hour so the "oh" or "uh" sounds are the trigger.
>>>
>>>Alias wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>How about, a university? an hour?
>>>>
>>>>Alias
>>>>
>>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>>>>news:uJ40GUhYFHA.3220@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>The using A or AN question, or the "funny" way Brits say aluminum?
>>>>>
>>>>>Guessing the first, and I've always used the "sounds odd method" of
>>>>>determining use. But from what I remember, if an "A" or an "AN" is
>>>>>used, then "a" gets used in front of everything but words starting with
>>>>>a, e, i and o, in which case "AN" would be used.
>>>>>
>>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Do you know the answer to the other question? My forgetting to say
>>>>>>"always capitilized" was just an error on my part, not an indication
>>>>>>that I don't know the language.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Alias
>>>>>>
>>>>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Sorry about the problems you are having with the language. IF ONE is
>>>>>>>attempting to create a riddle, then one needs to make sure the rules
>>>>>>>fit the answer. Of course since I know this, and am a "moron" but you
>>>>>>>apparently don't, just where does that put you???
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>I should have said "always capitalized", as in someone from Poland,
>>>>>>>>you moron.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Alias
>>>>>>>>"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>And how is "Polish your shoes." different than "Go polish your
>>>>>>>>>shoes." Once again we have an incorrect answer. Why? Because
>>>>>>>>>CAPITALIZATION DOES NOT CHANGE THE PRONUNCIATION! Comparing a
>>>>>>>>>proper noun and a verb is NOT the same word, merely the same letter
>>>>>>>>>combination. English teacher??
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>Alias wrote:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>Drum roll ....
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>We have a winner!
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>Alias
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>"Ken Blake" wrote
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>Alias typed:
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>>>So what is the English word which is pronounced differently
>>>>>>>>>>>>>when
>>>>>>>>>>>>>capitalised?
>>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>>Let's see if anyone knows.
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>Polish, polish.
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>--
>>>>>>>>>>>Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>>>>>>>>>>Please reply to the newsgroup
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>
>>
>>
>

Donald McDaniel
07-09-2005, 11:45 PM
On Thu, 26 May 2005 12:03:45 -0500, Bob I <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote:

>The using A or AN question, or the "funny" way Brits say aluminum?
>
>Guessing the first, and I've always used the "sounds odd method" of
>determining use. But from what I remember, if an "A" or an "AN" is used,
>then "a" gets used in front of everything but words starting with a, e,
>i and o, in which case "AN" would be used.

Instead of using spurious made-up methods for speaking and writing
English, why not use the tried-and-true rules of American English
grammar?

The rules for using "a" or "an" are these:

Use "a" before words which begin with consonants, or vowels which are
pronounced like consonants ("hard" vowels).

Use "an" before words which begin with ("soft") vowels, but not vowels
which are pronounced like consonants ("hard" vowels).

Donald L McDaniel
Please reply to the original thread
so that others may be instructed or informed
============================================

Bob I
07-09-2005, 11:46 PM
But I'm sure we went over that an hour ago!

Donald McDaniel wrote:

> On Thu, 26 May 2005 12:03:45 -0500, Bob I <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>
>>The using A or AN question, or the "funny" way Brits say aluminum?
>>
>>Guessing the first, and I've always used the "sounds odd method" of
>>determining use. But from what I remember, if an "A" or an "AN" is used,
>>then "a" gets used in front of everything but words starting with a, e,
>>i and o, in which case "AN" would be used.
>
>
> Instead of using spurious made-up methods for speaking and writing
> English, why not use the tried-and-true rules of American English
> grammar?
>
> The rules for using "a" or "an" are these:
>
> Use "a" before words which begin with consonants, or vowels which are
> pronounced like consonants ("hard" vowels).
>
> Use "an" before words which begin with ("soft") vowels, but not vowels
> which are pronounced like consonants ("hard" vowels).
>
> Donald L McDaniel
> Please reply to the original thread
> so that others may be instructed or informed
> ============================================

David Candy
07-09-2005, 11:47 PM
http://www.smh.com.au/news/Tips/QA/2005/05/25/1116950735148.html

You may want to look at this page Michael.


"Michael Stevens" <mstevens@bogusmvps.org> wrote in message
news:Oj#J1sdYFHA.252@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>
> "kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in message
> news:%23F19RDHYFHA.1148@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > Eddie wrote:
> >> OK - point taken.
> >>
> >> What does MVP mean?
> >
> > Monkeys on Valium or Percacet!
> >
> > --
> > Peace!
> > Kurt
> > Self-anointed Moderator
> > microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
> > http://microscum.com/mscommunity
> > "Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
> > "Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"
> >
>
> Totally without humor rebuttal answer.
> "Microsoft Most Valuable Professional"
> Humor intended reply rebuttal
> "Kurt is a total putz 8-) and if his idealogy shifted a hair toward
> realistic he would fulfill all the requirments necessary for being awarded
> the MS-MVP award. He secretly habours a jealous rage about this. LOL The
one
> thing you can always be assured, he will never always be nice, completlely
> wrong, or shy away from annaliatiung a newbie that makes stupid replies.
> Take Kurt's advice as his advice.......Please don't take his word as if it
> was a LAW!!" <VBG>
> --
> Michael Stevens MS-MVP XP
> xpnews@bogusmichaelstevenstech.com
> http://www.michaelstevenstech.com
> For a better newsgroup experience. Setup a newsreader.
> http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/outlookexpressnewreader.htm
>
>
>

guestfromhell
07-09-2005, 11:47 PM
andy smart Wrote:
> Eddie wrote:
> > Where are microsoft in all this?
> >
> > We've all got problems and the only people we talk to are each other.
> By
> > definition, nobody here is an expert since we all ask questions.
> We're going
> > round and round in circles. How many times have you actually seen
> someone
> > ask a question and really get a good answer that actually solves the
> problem
> > for them?
>
> Loads of times actually :-)
>
> Usually replies just state the obvious or say that they have the
> > same problem.
>
> >
> > Wouldn't it be nice to have a real MS representative to actually fix
> things
> > for us. Where are they?
>
> Doing their jobs, re-emburse MS for their time and they'll answer your
> problems.

AH but that in itself is contentious.

If Ford sold cars with as many things as wrong with there products as
Microsoft do, there would be uproar. MS should make sure there products
are as described, fit for the purpose intended and of merchantable
quality. ANd, they quite frequently are not. When you've worked with
Unix, Linux MAcs and SecurePlatform, you realise what utter garbage
Windows is.

So personally, I expect MS to tell me how to correct the errors they
have failed to remove and if the do so free and quickly I wont charge
them for wasting my time fixing there underdeveloped overpriced
garbage. MS has such a monopoly and so much money that they could give
Windows and Office away for free and still show a profit at the end of
the year. They could easily afford to run a free helpdesk but they
don't give a toss, so thats never likely to happen

The rip the English off by translating Dollar prices to Sterling, which
amounts to a 180% price hike, and they are determined to develop
technology that will give them complete control of the Internet
(Palladium). as well wiping out the remaining competition so they have
a 100% control of all the worlds computing.

Bill Gates is nearly the worlds first trillionaire, so pardon me if i
dont shed a tear for his misfortune. Microsoft's products are poor
quality rubbish sold without a hint of conscience at excessive proces
to a captive audience without a car for what happens afterwards. They
are the worst thing that ever happened to mankind and a bigger threat
to freedom and democracy since Ghengis Khans Mongol hoards swept across
Europe.


--
guestfromhell
------------------------------------------------------------------------
guestfromhell's Profile: http://www.iamnotageek.com/member.php?userid=12490
View this thread: http://www.iamnotageek.com/showthread.php?t=1819074897

Michael Stevens
07-10-2005, 12:22 AM
In news:usRd8jeYFHA.4024@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
kurttrail <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> replied with a ;-)
> Michael Stevens wrote:
>> "kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in
>> message news:%23F19RDHYFHA.1148@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>>> Eddie wrote:
>>>> OK - point taken.
>>>>
>>>> What does MVP mean?
>>>
>>> Monkeys on Valium or Percacet!
>>>
>>
>> Totally without humor rebuttal answer.
>> "Microsoft Most Valuable Professional"
>
> You know I was joking, right? It just seems the acronym MVP is pretty
> universal,
>
> Most Valuable P...
> Player.
> Person.
> And in this case Professional.
>

Of course I knew. LOL

> I would think that some of these people asking would acknowledge that
> the first two letters and just ask what does the "P" stand for in MVP?
>
>> Humor intended reply rebuttal
>> "Kurt is a total putz 8-) and if his ideology shifted a hair toward
>> realistic he would fulfill all the requirements necessary for being
>> awarded the MS-MVP award. He secretly harbors a jealous rage about
>> this. LOL The one thing you can always be assured, he will never
>> always be nice, completely wrong, or shy away from annaliatiung a
>> newbie that makes stupid replies. Take Kurt's advice as his
>> advice.......Please don't take his word as if it was a LAW!!" <VBG>
>

Did you think I was replying seriously when I included the humor intended
caveat? I was answering truthfully, but not maliciously. I only conveyed
what you have said and what I have personally garnered from your posts.

> LOL! Who are you quoting? Yourself?


Looks like I am, but I don't remember why or adding the quotes. I am
responsible for the Humor intended reply and the <VBG> still applies.

> I'll go it alone, that's how it must be
> I can't be right for somebody else
> If I'm not right for me
> I gotta be free, I just gotta be free
> Daring to try, to do it or die
> I gotta be me

Sorry for the late reply, had some unavoidable health issues.
--
Michael Stevens MS-MVP XP
xpnews@bogusmichaelstevenstech.com
http://www.michaelstevenstech.com
For a better newsgroup experience. Setup a newsreader.
http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/outlookexpressnewreader.htm

kurttrail
07-10-2005, 12:22 AM
Michael Stevens wrote:
> In news:usRd8jeYFHA.4024@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
> kurttrail <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> replied with a
> ;-)
>> Michael Stevens wrote:
>>> "kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in
>>> message news:%23F19RDHYFHA.1148@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>>>> Eddie wrote:
>>>>> OK - point taken.
>>>>>
>>>>> What does MVP mean?
>>>>
>>>> Monkeys on Valium or Percacet!
>>>>
>>>
>>> Totally without humor rebuttal answer.
>>> "Microsoft Most Valuable Professional"
>>
>> You know I was joking, right? It just seems the acronym MVP is
>> pretty universal,
>>
>> Most Valuable P...
>> Player.
>> Person.
>> And in this case Professional.
>>
>
> Of course I knew. LOL
>
>> I would think that some of these people asking would acknowledge that
>> the first two letters and just ask what does the "P" stand for in
>> MVP?

Isn't that a yellow waste fluid?

>>
>>> Humor intended reply rebuttal
>>> "Kurt is a total putz 8-) and if his ideology shifted a hair toward
>>> realistic he would fulfill all the requirements necessary for being
>>> awarded the MS-MVP award. He secretly harbors a jealous rage about
>>> this. LOL The one thing you can always be assured, he will never
>>> always be nice, completely wrong, or shy away from annaliatiung a
>>> newbie that makes stupid replies. Take Kurt's advice as his
>>> advice.......Please don't take his word as if it was a LAW!!" <VBG>
>>
>
> Did you think I was replying seriously when I included the humor
> intended caveat? I was answering truthfully, but not maliciously. I
> only conveyed what you have said and what I have personally garnered
> from your posts.
>> LOL! Who are you quoting? Yourself?
>
>
> Looks like I am, but I don't remember why or adding the quotes. I am
> responsible for the Humor intended reply and the <VBG> still applies.
>
>> I'll go it alone, that's how it must be
>> I can't be right for somebody else
>> If I'm not right for me
>> I gotta be free, I just gotta be free
>> Daring to try, to do it or die
>> I gotta be me
>
> Sorry for the late reply, had some unavoidable health issues.

I was wondering where you have been. Thought you were on vacation or
something.

Hope you are feeling better.

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"


Where are Microsoft?