read only



windowuser
07-10-2005, 12:38 AM
When i click on the attribute "read-only" i have three choices. a check, a
box, or empty.

can someone explain the box versus the check?

windowuser
07-10-2005, 12:38 AM
I cannot find any clear documention on the windows website

"windowuser" wrote:

> When i click on the attribute "read-only" i have three choices. a check, a
> box, or empty.
>
> can someone explain the box versus the check?

Wesley Vogel
07-10-2005, 12:38 AM
Read-only means nothing for folders. Only a file can be Read-only.

The Read-only check box for folders is there for convenience, it allows you
to change the Read-only attribute of all the files contained in that folder.

[[Unlike the Read-only attribute for a file, the Read-only attribute for a
folder is typically ignored by Windows, Windows components and accessories,
and other programs.]]

[[The Read-only check box for folders is not available because it does not
apply to the folder. You can use this check box to set the Read-only
attribute for files in the folder.]]

Cannot View or Change the Read-Only or System Attribute of Folders
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326549/

-----

The gray state means...

[[Microsoft calls this a tri-mode flag. When it has gray in the background,
it indicates that some file or folder anywhere under that particular folder
has been set to Read-only.

This checkmark does not actually control the Read-only attribute on the
child files and folder. It just displays their status.]]

Rally 'Round the Tri-Mode Flag
http://www.mcpmag.com/columns/article.asp?EditorialsID=652

If you uncheck the Read-Only attribute, Windows will prompt you to confirm
your changes.

-----
You have chosen to make the following attribute change(s):

unset read-only

Do you want to apply this change to this folder only, or do you want to
apply it to all subfolders and files as well?
-----

Click the option that you want, and then click OK.
---

Basically this means nothing for folders.

[[Windows Explorer uses the Read-Only attribute to determine whether or not
a folder is customized.]]
Unable to Remove Read-Only Attribute from Folder
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326549/

You can't remove the read-only attribute from a folder?
http://www.jsiinc.com/SUBG/TIP3200/rh3212.htm

HOW TO: Take Ownership of a File or Folder in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;308421


--
Hope this helps. Let us know.

Wes
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

In news:1F6D9B30-FC03-4AFD-AD07-3CB0DB527C92@microsoft.com,
windowuser <windowuser@discussions.microsoft.com> hunted and pecked:
> I cannot find any clear documention on the windows website
>
> "windowuser" wrote:
>
>> When i click on the attribute "read-only" i have three choices. a
>> check, a box, or empty.
>>
>> can someone explain the box versus the check?

windowuser
07-10-2005, 12:38 AM
that was helpful. However, When I go to a folder and click on the read only
attributes box in properties, i click it once to get a check, twice and the
entire box is colored in, and a third time to empty the box.

that is the part i don't understand. What is the difference between
selecting to check the box, or color it in completely?

"Wesley Vogel" wrote:

> Read-only means nothing for folders. Only a file can be Read-only.
>
> The Read-only check box for folders is there for convenience, it allows you
> to change the Read-only attribute of all the files contained in that folder.
>
> [[Unlike the Read-only attribute for a file, the Read-only attribute for a
> folder is typically ignored by Windows, Windows components and accessories,
> and other programs.]]
>
> [[The Read-only check box for folders is not available because it does not
> apply to the folder. You can use this check box to set the Read-only
> attribute for files in the folder.]]
>
> Cannot View or Change the Read-Only or System Attribute of Folders
> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326549/
>
> -----
>
> The gray state means...
>
> [[Microsoft calls this a tri-mode flag. When it has gray in the background,
> it indicates that some file or folder anywhere under that particular folder
> has been set to Read-only.
>
> This checkmark does not actually control the Read-only attribute on the
> child files and folder. It just displays their status.]]
>
> Rally 'Round the Tri-Mode Flag
> http://www.mcpmag.com/columns/article.asp?EditorialsID=652
>
> If you uncheck the Read-Only attribute, Windows will prompt you to confirm
> your changes.
>
> -----
> You have chosen to make the following attribute change(s):
>
> unset read-only
>
> Do you want to apply this change to this folder only, or do you want to
> apply it to all subfolders and files as well?
> -----
>
> Click the option that you want, and then click OK.
> ---
>
> Basically this means nothing for folders.
>
> [[Windows Explorer uses the Read-Only attribute to determine whether or not
> a folder is customized.]]
> Unable to Remove Read-Only Attribute from Folder
> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326549/
>
> You can't remove the read-only attribute from a folder?
> http://www.jsiinc.com/SUBG/TIP3200/rh3212.htm
>
> HOW TO: Take Ownership of a File or Folder in Windows XP
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;308421
>
>
> --
> Hope this helps. Let us know.
>
> Wes
> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
>
> In news:1F6D9B30-FC03-4AFD-AD07-3CB0DB527C92@microsoft.com,
> windowuser <windowuser@discussions.microsoft.com> hunted and pecked:
> > I cannot find any clear documention on the windows website
> >
> > "windowuser" wrote:
> >
> >> When i click on the attribute "read-only" i have three choices. a
> >> check, a box, or empty.
> >>
> >> can someone explain the box versus the check?
>
>

Rock
07-10-2005, 12:39 AM
windowuser wrote:

> that was helpful. However, When I go to a folder and click on the read only
> attributes box in properties, i click it once to get a check, twice and the
> entire box is colored in, and a third time to empty the box.
>
> that is the part i don't understand. What is the difference between
> selecting to check the box, or color it in completely?
>

<snip>

>>Cannot View or Change the Read-Only or System Attribute of Folders
>>http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326549/

The answer to your question is explained in the article Wes provided
above.


--
Rock
MS MVP Windows - Shell/User

windowuser
07-10-2005, 12:40 AM
I am missing it. I am not asking what it means if the box is grayed out with
a check.

I can actually click on the box and get it to toggle between, clear, check,
and all filled in with a solid color.

I do not see were that is explained?

"Rock" wrote:

> windowuser wrote:
>
> > that was helpful. However, When I go to a folder and click on the read only
> > attributes box in properties, i click it once to get a check, twice and the
> > entire box is colored in, and a third time to empty the box.
> >
> > that is the part i don't understand. What is the difference between
> > selecting to check the box, or color it in completely?
> >
>
> <snip>
>
> >>Cannot View or Change the Read-Only or System Attribute of Folders
> >>http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326549/
>
> The answer to your question is explained in the article Wes provided
> above.
>
>
> --
> Rock
> MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
>
>

Rock
07-10-2005, 12:40 AM
windowuser wrote:

> I am missing it. I am not asking what it means if the box is grayed out with
> a check.
>
> I can actually click on the box and get it to toggle between, clear, check,
> and all filled in with a solid color.
>
> I do not see were that is explained?
>
> "Rock" wrote:
>
>
>>windowuser wrote:
>>
>>
>>>that was helpful. However, When I go to a folder and click on the read only
>>>attributes box in properties, i click it once to get a check, twice and the
>>>entire box is colored in, and a third time to empty the box.
>>>
>>>that is the part i don't understand. What is the difference between
>>>selecting to check the box, or color it in completely?
>>>
>>
>><snip>
>>
>>>>Cannot View or Change the Read-Only or System Attribute of Folders
>>>>http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326549/
>>
>>The answer to your question is explained in the article Wes provided
>>above.
>>
>>
>>--
>>Rock
>>MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
>>
>>

It's in the article. Look at the fourth paragraph under Symptoms - for
example. It starts with, "If you click Apply....". It changes the read
attributes of the files contained in that folder and possibly all
subfolders, depending on how you respond to the prompt that is
presented, but does nothing for the folder itself or any subfolders

--
Rock
MS MVP Windows - Shell/User

windowuser
07-10-2005, 12:41 AM
I understand that read only affects the files not the folders. when i click
on a folder properties and check "read-only" it effects the files in the
folder(got it)

HOWEVER, what is the difference between a check (one click), and the whole
box being greened-out (two clicks). A third click empties the box



"Rock" wrote:

> windowuser wrote:
>
> > I am missing it. I am not asking what it means if the box is grayed out with
> > a check.
> >
> > I can actually click on the box and get it to toggle between, clear, check,
> > and all filled in with a solid color.
> >
> > I do not see were that is explained?
> >
> > "Rock" wrote:
> >
> >
> >>windowuser wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>that was helpful. However, When I go to a folder and click on the read only
> >>>attributes box in properties, i click it once to get a check, twice and the
> >>>entire box is colored in, and a third time to empty the box.
> >>>
> >>>that is the part i don't understand. What is the difference between
> >>>selecting to check the box, or color it in completely?
> >>>
> >>
> >><snip>
> >>
> >>>>Cannot View or Change the Read-Only or System Attribute of Folders
> >>>>http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326549/
> >>
> >>The answer to your question is explained in the article Wes provided
> >>above.
> >>
> >>
> >>--
> >>Rock
> >>MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
> >>
> >>
>
> It's in the article. Look at the fourth paragraph under Symptoms - for
> example. It starts with, "If you click Apply....". It changes the read
> attributes of the files contained in that folder and possibly all
> subfolders, depending on how you respond to the prompt that is
> presented, but does nothing for the folder itself or any subfolders
>
> --
> Rock
> MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
>
>

Rock
07-10-2005, 12:41 AM
windowuser wrote:

> I understand that read only affects the files not the folders. when i click
> on a folder properties and check "read-only" it effects the files in the
> folder(got it)
>
> HOWEVER, what is the difference between a check (one click), and the whole
> box being greened-out (two clicks). A third click empties the box
>
>
>
> "Rock" wrote:
>
>
>>windowuser wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I am missing it. I am not asking what it means if the box is grayed out with
>>>a check.
>>>
>>>I can actually click on the box and get it to toggle between, clear, check,
>>>and all filled in with a solid color.
>>>
>>>I do not see were that is explained?
>>>
>>>"Rock" wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>windowuser wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>that was helpful. However, When I go to a folder and click on the read only
>>>>>attributes box in properties, i click it once to get a check, twice and the
>>>>>entire box is colored in, and a third time to empty the box.
>>>>>
>>>>>that is the part i don't understand. What is the difference between
>>>>>selecting to check the box, or color it in completely?
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>><snip>
>>>>
>>>>>>Cannot View or Change the Read-Only or System Attribute of Folders
>>>>>>http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326549/
>>>>
>>>>The answer to your question is explained in the article Wes provided
>>>>above.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>--
>>>>Rock
>>>>MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
>>>>
>>>>
>>
>>It's in the article. Look at the fourth paragraph under Symptoms - for
>>example. It starts with, "If you click Apply....". It changes the read
>>attributes of the files contained in that folder and possibly all
>>subfolders, depending on how you respond to the prompt that is
>>presented, but does nothing for the folder itself or any subfolders
>>
>>--
>>Rock
>>MS MVP Windows - Shell/User
>>
>>

One sets the read only attribute (checked), one removes it (empty), and
the shaded one is the default state for folders. Test it! Create a
folder, put in a file and make the changes. If you set it to checked or
blank, close the folder, then open it again it is set back to the
default of shaded. Test it and find out for yourself.

--
Rock
MS MVP Windows - Shell/User


read only