Hard Drive Partition Question



BYG
07-09-2005, 11:38 PM
My 200 GB hard drive has been partitioned by the manufacturer into a 15GB
"C" drive and a 185GB "D" drive.

The problem is that all programs or downloads default to the C drive and it
fills up very fast. This in turn generates warning signs from Windows (XP
Home Edition-SP2) demanding that I delete some files and free some space on
drive C. It has been a constant battle since I bought this VAIO computer.

Is there a way of removing the partition and making it one large C drive,
without having to reformat the hard disk and losing everything?

ByTor
07-09-2005, 11:38 PM
In article <e00pa5fXFHA.2348@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl>, "BYG"
<ghorayebatmsndotcom>, says...

> My 200 GB hard drive has been partitioned by the manufacturer into a 15GB
> "C" drive and a 185GB "D" drive.
>
> The problem is that all programs or downloads default to the C drive and it
> fills up very fast. This in turn generates warning signs from Windows (XP
> Home Edition-SP2) demanding that I delete some files and free some space on
> drive C. It has been a constant battle since I bought this VAIO computer.
>
> Is there a way of removing the partition and making it one large C drive,
> without having to reformat the hard disk and losing everything?
>
>
>

Move all your data(not installs of programs) to the D drive than in the
future direct your downloads/saved data to D..............Typically
15gig is perfect for an OS......But as with any proprietary machine they
assume no one knows how to use a computer and use one drive for data,
which I feel is "DUMB".....and very bold & smart on VAIO's part if they
indeed ship their machines like that........but anyway..............

Re-sizing will take third party partitioning tools, I don't mess with
free ones so someone here will have an answer for ya, I know them but I
don't recommend anything I have not used or tested....I use
PartitionMagic.

AMO
07-09-2005, 11:38 PM
"BYG" <ghorayebatmsndotcom> wrote in message
news:e00pa5fXFHA.2348@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> My 200 GB hard drive has been partitioned by the manufacturer into a 15GB
> "C" drive and a 185GB "D" drive.
>
> The problem is that all programs or downloads default to the C drive and
> it fills up very fast. This in turn generates warning signs from Windows
> (XP Home Edition-SP2) demanding that I delete some files and free some
> space on drive C. It has been a constant battle since I bought this VAIO
> computer.

Uninstall as much existing software and reinstall selecting your D drive
instead. You may need to select Custon installs in order to be able to
change directory.
Some things such as Norton AntiVirus you won't be able to entirely install
onto another drive.
You can also move the Virtual Memory that windows uses from your C drive.

> Is there a way of removing the partition and making it one large C drive,
> without having to reformat the hard disk and losing everything?

You can use tools like Partition Magic. Personally, I avoid such tools, but
they are okay so long as you don't lose power whilst its working.

In the past 15Gb was plenty for a C drive and partitioning your drive this
way is an excellent way forward. These days the argument is still true, but
you need your C drive to be 20-30Gb if possible. Windows XP with Service
Pack 2 and a few additional downloads like the .Net framework will easily
fill the windows installation drive to 10Gb. For optimal efficiency and to
give additional space for Windows to manage temporary files and virtual
memory, on a 200Gb drive, you want to give 30Gb to your C drive. Ideally
you'd still want to install programs on a seperate drive to the C drive.

As the C drive is the one that gets fragmented the most you will be
defragmenting this drive the most.

Its up to you how you would partition your drives. I would go for something
like:

C: System 30Gb
D: Programs 30Gb
E: Games 10 Gb (Programs that are games).
F: Music 50Gb
G: Videos: 50G

and then a few smaller partitions for documents, backup, work etc. Some
people prefer to put everything into a single drive and just create
sub-directories. Others prefer more partitions. They each have their
advantages / disadvantages, but certainly seperating a partition for system
use is always a good thing. If something goes wrong then you can just
reformat that drive and reinstall. This is one of the reasons why I also
partition off the Windows and Games which depend on the registry. Its not
essential, but its nice.

AMO

Ken Blake
07-09-2005, 11:38 PM
In news:e00pa5fXFHA.2348@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl,
BYG <ghorayebatmsndotcom> typed:

> Is there a way of removing the partition and making it one
> large C
> drive, without having to reformat the hard disk and losing
> everything?


Unfortunately, no version of Windows provides any way of changing
the partition structure of the drive nondestructively. The only
way to do what you want is with third-party software. Partition
Magic is the best-known such program, but there are
freeware/shareware alternatives. One such program is BootIt Next
Generation. It's shareware, but comes with a free 30-day trial,
so you should be able to do what you want within that 30 days. I
haven't used it myself, but it comes highly recommended by
several other MVPs here.


--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup

BYG
07-09-2005, 11:38 PM
Thank you everyone for responding so promptly.

Could I impose with another question?

I have read about the Recovery Console command "Diskpart"
such as:
diskpart/delete\Device\HardDisk0\Partition3
or
diskpart/ delete D:
This command is supposed to remove a partition

I have not found much about what happens to the contents of these drives
when the partition is removed. Do they become part of the C: drive if let's
say a D; drive is deleted?

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

"Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
news:ukv%23UshXFHA.2124@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> In news:e00pa5fXFHA.2348@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl,
> BYG <ghorayebatmsndotcom> typed:
>
>> Is there a way of removing the partition and making it one large C
>> drive, without having to reformat the hard disk and losing everything?
>
>
> Unfortunately, no version of Windows provides any way of changing the
> partition structure of the drive nondestructively. The only way to do what
> you want is with third-party software. Partition Magic is the best-known
> such program, but there are freeware/shareware alternatives. One such
> program is BootIt Next Generation. It's shareware, but comes with a free
> 30-day trial, so you should be able to do what you want within that 30
> days. I haven't used it myself, but it comes highly recommended by several
> other MVPs here.
>
>
> --
> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
> Please reply to the newsgroup
>
>

Ken Blake
07-09-2005, 11:38 PM
In news:%23T%238EdiXFHA.1508@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
BYG <ghorayebatmsndotcom> typed:

> Thank you everyone for responding so promptly.


You're welcome. Glad to help.


> Could I impose with another question?


Of course. It's not at all an imposition.


> I have read about the Recovery Console command "Diskpart"
> such as:
> diskpart/delete\Device\HardDisk0\Partition3
> or
> diskpart/ delete D:
> This command is supposed to remove a partition
>
> I have not found much about what happens to the contents of
> these
> drives when the partition is removed. Do they become part of
> the C:
> drive if let's say a D; drive is deleted?


No. If you delete a partition, you also delete its contents. The
space where it used to be is then unpartitioned space.

As I said, there is no way using native Windows facilities to do
what you want. A third-party tool is required.

--
Ken Blake
Please reply to the newsgroup



> "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
> news:ukv%23UshXFHA.2124@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> In news:e00pa5fXFHA.2348@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl,
>> BYG <ghorayebatmsndotcom> typed:
>>
>>> Is there a way of removing the partition and making it one
>>> large C
>>> drive, without having to reformat the hard disk and losing
>>> everything?
>>
>>
>> Unfortunately, no version of Windows provides any way of
>> changing the
>> partition structure of the drive nondestructively. The only
>> way to
>> do what you want is with third-party software. Partition Magic
>> is
>> the best-known such program, but there are freeware/shareware
>> alternatives. One such program is BootIt Next Generation. It's
>> shareware, but comes with a free 30-day trial, so you should
>> be able
>> to do what you want within that 30 days. I haven't used it
>> myself,
>> but it comes highly recommended by several other MVPs here.
>>
>>
>> --
>> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>> Please reply to the newsgroup

BYG
07-09-2005, 11:38 PM
Ken,

Thanks again


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
"Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
news:118urcfg5smj642@corp.supernews.com...
> In news:%23T%238EdiXFHA.1508@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
> BYG <ghorayebatmsndotcom> typed:
>
>> Thank you everyone for responding so promptly.
>
>
> You're welcome. Glad to help.
>
>
>> Could I impose with another question?
>
>
> Of course. It's not at all an imposition.
>
>
>> I have read about the Recovery Console command "Diskpart"
>> such as:
>> diskpart/delete\Device\HardDisk0\Partition3
>> or
>> diskpart/ delete D:
>> This command is supposed to remove a partition
>>
>> I have not found much about what happens to the contents of these
>> drives when the partition is removed. Do they become part of the C:
>> drive if let's say a D; drive is deleted?
>
>
> No. If you delete a partition, you also delete its contents. The space
> where it used to be is then unpartitioned space.
>
> As I said, there is no way using native Windows facilities to do what you
> want. A third-party tool is required.
>
> --
> Ken Blake
> Please reply to the newsgroup
>
>
>
>> "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
>> news:ukv%23UshXFHA.2124@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>> In news:e00pa5fXFHA.2348@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl,
>>> BYG <ghorayebatmsndotcom> typed:
>>>
>>>> Is there a way of removing the partition and making it one large C
>>>> drive, without having to reformat the hard disk and losing
>>>> everything?
>>>
>>>
>>> Unfortunately, no version of Windows provides any way of changing the
>>> partition structure of the drive nondestructively. The only way to
>>> do what you want is with third-party software. Partition Magic is
>>> the best-known such program, but there are freeware/shareware
>>> alternatives. One such program is BootIt Next Generation. It's
>>> shareware, but comes with a free 30-day trial, so you should be able
>>> to do what you want within that 30 days. I haven't used it myself,
>>> but it comes highly recommended by several other MVPs here.
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>> Please reply to the newsgroup
>
>

Ken Blake
07-09-2005, 11:38 PM
In news:%23ojyMFjXFHA.2520@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
BYG <ghorayebatmsndotcom> typed:

> Ken,
>
> Thanks again


You're very welcome,

--
Ken Blake
Please reply to the newsgroup

>
>
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
> "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
> news:118urcfg5smj642@corp.supernews.com...
>> In news:%23T%238EdiXFHA.1508@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
>> BYG <ghorayebatmsndotcom> typed:
>>
>>> Thank you everyone for responding so promptly.
>>
>>
>> You're welcome. Glad to help.
>>
>>
>>> Could I impose with another question?
>>
>>
>> Of course. It's not at all an imposition.
>>
>>
>>> I have read about the Recovery Console command "Diskpart"
>>> such as:
>>> diskpart/delete\Device\HardDisk0\Partition3
>>> or
>>> diskpart/ delete D:
>>> This command is supposed to remove a partition
>>>
>>> I have not found much about what happens to the contents of
>>> these
>>> drives when the partition is removed. Do they become part of
>>> the C:
>>> drive if let's say a D; drive is deleted?
>>
>>
>> No. If you delete a partition, you also delete its contents.
>> The
>> space where it used to be is then unpartitioned space.
>>
>> As I said, there is no way using native Windows facilities to
>> do
>> what you want. A third-party tool is required.
>>
>> --
>> Ken Blake
>> Please reply to the newsgroup
>>
>>
>>
>>> "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in
>>> message
>>> news:ukv%23UshXFHA.2124@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>> In news:e00pa5fXFHA.2348@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl,
>>>> BYG <ghorayebatmsndotcom> typed:
>>>>
>>>>> Is there a way of removing the partition and making it one
>>>>> large C
>>>>> drive, without having to reformat the hard disk and losing
>>>>> everything?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Unfortunately, no version of Windows provides any way of
>>>> changing
>>>> the partition structure of the drive nondestructively. The
>>>> only
>>>> way to do what you want is with third-party software.
>>>> Partition
>>>> Magic is the best-known such program, but there are
>>>> freeware/shareware alternatives. One such program is BootIt
>>>> Next
>>>> Generation. It's shareware, but comes with a free 30-day
>>>> trial, so
>>>> you should be able to do what you want within that 30 days.
>>>> I
>>>> haven't used it myself, but it comes highly recommended by
>>>> several
>>>> other MVPs here. --
>>>> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
>>>> Please reply to the newsgroup


Hard Drive Partition Question