Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt: System32\Drivers\Ntfs.sys



Sam Goddard
07-10-2005, 12:36 AM
Hello,

I have a computer that is running windows XP that gave the message in the
title. This error usually happens when you convert from FAT32 to NTFS.
However, this computer has not had its drives converted.

I wasn't able to replace ntfs.sys using the recovery consol but I was able
to do it by attaching the hard drive to another computer & copying the file
over. However, this made no difference & the next time I started up I got
the same missing or corrupt file error.

Does anybody have any further suggestions as to how I might be able to
resotre the operating system without starting from scratch?

Thanks

Sam

Malke
07-10-2005, 12:36 AM
Sam Goddard wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I have a computer that is running windows XP that gave the message in
> the title. This error usually happens when you convert from FAT32 to
> NTFS. However, this computer has not had its drives converted.
>
> I wasn't able to replace ntfs.sys using the recovery consol but I was
> able to do it by attaching the hard drive to another computer &
> copying the file over. However, this made no difference & the next
> time I started up I got the same missing or corrupt file error.
>
> Does anybody have any further suggestions as to how I might be able to
> resotre the operating system without starting from scratch?
>
> Thanks
>
> Sam

Since you've already replaced the file and the problem is recurring, my
next step would be to test the hard drive's health. Test the hard drive
with a diagnostic utility from the mftr. Usually you will download the
file and make a bootable floppy with it. Boot with the media and do a
thorough test. If the drive has physical errors, replace it. Trying to
fix a hardware problem with software (Windows) is futile.

Malke
--
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic!"
MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User

Sam Goddard
07-10-2005, 12:36 AM
Thank you for that sage piece of advice.

Is there usually a particular piece of hardware that fails when this happens
or could it be anything?

Sam

"Malke" <invalid@not-real.com> wrote in message
news:%23eNuFAUXFHA.1040@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Sam Goddard wrote:
>
>> Hello,
>>
>> I have a computer that is running windows XP that gave the message in
>> the title. This error usually happens when you convert from FAT32 to
>> NTFS. However, this computer has not had its drives converted.
>>
>> I wasn't able to replace ntfs.sys using the recovery consol but I was
>> able to do it by attaching the hard drive to another computer &
>> copying the file over. However, this made no difference & the next
>> time I started up I got the same missing or corrupt file error.
>>
>> Does anybody have any further suggestions as to how I might be able to
>> resotre the operating system without starting from scratch?
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Sam
>
> Since you've already replaced the file and the problem is recurring, my
> next step would be to test the hard drive's health. Test the hard drive
> with a diagnostic utility from the mftr. Usually you will download the
> file and make a bootable floppy with it. Boot with the media and do a
> thorough test. If the drive has physical errors, replace it. Trying to
> fix a hardware problem with software (Windows) is futile.
>
> Malke
> --
> Elephant Boy Computers
> www.elephantboycomputers.com
> "Don't Panic!"
> MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User

Malke
07-10-2005, 12:36 AM
Sam Goddard wrote:

> Thank you for that sage piece of advice.
>
> Is there usually a particular piece of hardware that fails when this
> happens or could it be anything?
>
> Sam
>

There was a reason I suggested you test the hard drive. ;-) After the
hard drive, the next item I would test is the RAM. Here are my general
hardware troubleshooting steps, not all of which may apply to your
situation:

1) Open the computer and run it open, cleaning out all dust bunnies and
observing all fans (overheating will cause system freezing). Obviously
you can't do this with a laptop, but you can hear if the fan is running
and feel if the laptop is getting too hot.

2) Test the RAM - I like Memtest86+ from www.memtest.org. Obviously, you
have to get the program from a working machine. You will either
download the precompiled Windows binary to make a bootable floppy or
the .iso to make a bootable cd. If you want to use the latter, you'll
need to have third-party burning software on the machine where you
download the file - XP's built-in burning capability won't do the job.
In either case, boot with the media you made. The test will run
immediately. Let the test run for an extended period of time - unless
errors are seen immediately. If you get any errors, replace the RAM.

3) Test the hard drive with a diagnostic utility from the mftr. Usually
you will download the file and make a bootable floppy with it. Boot
with the media and do a thorough test. If the drive has physical
errors, replace it.

4) The power supply may be going bad or be inadequate for the devices
you have in the system. The adequacy issue doesn't really apply to a
laptop, although of course the power
supply can be faulty.

5) Test the motherboard with something like TuffTest from
www.tufftest.com. Sometimes this is useful, and sometimes it isn't.

Testing hardware failures often involves swapping out suspected parts
with known-good parts. If you can't do the testing yourself and/or are
uncomfortable opening your computer, take the machine to a professional
computer repair shop (not your local equivalent of BigStoreUSA).

Malke
--
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic!"
MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User

Sam Goddard
07-10-2005, 12:39 AM
Thanks for that. I ran a series of tests and, apart from a small error on
the hard disk which is now fixed, there was no problem. However, when
starting up, there is still a problem, I still get the missing or corrupt
ntfs.sys message.

Do you have any further suggestions? Is this definitely a hardware issue or
is there any further software issues?

Thanks

Sam
"Malke" <invalid@not-real.com> wrote in message
news:er$KqIUXFHA.1796@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Sam Goddard wrote:
>
>> Thank you for that sage piece of advice.
>>
>> Is there usually a particular piece of hardware that fails when this
>> happens or could it be anything?
>>
>> Sam
>>
>
> There was a reason I suggested you test the hard drive. ;-) After the
> hard drive, the next item I would test is the RAM. Here are my general
> hardware troubleshooting steps, not all of which may apply to your
> situation:
>
> 1) Open the computer and run it open, cleaning out all dust bunnies and
> observing all fans (overheating will cause system freezing). Obviously
> you can't do this with a laptop, but you can hear if the fan is running
> and feel if the laptop is getting too hot.
>
> 2) Test the RAM - I like Memtest86+ from www.memtest.org. Obviously, you
> have to get the program from a working machine. You will either
> download the precompiled Windows binary to make a bootable floppy or
> the .iso to make a bootable cd. If you want to use the latter, you'll
> need to have third-party burning software on the machine where you
> download the file - XP's built-in burning capability won't do the job.
> In either case, boot with the media you made. The test will run
> immediately. Let the test run for an extended period of time - unless
> errors are seen immediately. If you get any errors, replace the RAM.
>
> 3) Test the hard drive with a diagnostic utility from the mftr. Usually
> you will download the file and make a bootable floppy with it. Boot
> with the media and do a thorough test. If the drive has physical
> errors, replace it.
>
> 4) The power supply may be going bad or be inadequate for the devices
> you have in the system. The adequacy issue doesn't really apply to a
> laptop, although of course the power
> supply can be faulty.
>
> 5) Test the motherboard with something like TuffTest from
> www.tufftest.com. Sometimes this is useful, and sometimes it isn't.
>
> Testing hardware failures often involves swapping out suspected parts
> with known-good parts. If you can't do the testing yourself and/or are
> uncomfortable opening your computer, take the machine to a professional
> computer repair shop (not your local equivalent of BigStoreUSA).
>
> Malke
> --
> Elephant Boy Computers
> www.elephantboycomputers.com
> "Don't Panic!"
> MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User

Malke
07-10-2005, 12:39 AM
Sam Goddard wrote:

> Thanks for that. I ran a series of tests and, apart from a small error
> on the hard disk which is now fixed, there was no problem. However,
> when starting up, there is still a problem, I still get the missing or
> corrupt ntfs.sys message.
>
> Do you have any further suggestions? Is this definitely a hardware
> issue or is there any further software issues?
>

What do you mean "small error on the hard disk which was fixed"? Did you
test with the drive mftr.'s utility? What about RAM - did you test the
RAM?

Malke
--
MS-MVP Windows User/Shell
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic"

Sam Goddard
07-10-2005, 12:39 AM
I tested with the manufacturer's (Seagate's) utility. It came up with a bad
sector on the disk & then fixed it. I used the memtest program to test RAM.
This ran three times & found no errors.


"Malke" <notreally@invalid.com> wrote in message
news:uehNstxXFHA.584@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Sam Goddard wrote:
>
>> Thanks for that. I ran a series of tests and, apart from a small error
>> on the hard disk which is now fixed, there was no problem. However,
>> when starting up, there is still a problem, I still get the missing or
>> corrupt ntfs.sys message.
>>
>> Do you have any further suggestions? Is this definitely a hardware
>> issue or is there any further software issues?
>>
>
> What do you mean "small error on the hard disk which was fixed"? Did you
> test with the drive mftr.'s utility? What about RAM - did you test the
> RAM?
>
> Malke
> --
> MS-MVP Windows User/Shell
> Elephant Boy Computers
> www.elephantboycomputers.com
> "Don't Panic"

Malke
07-10-2005, 12:41 AM
Sam Goddard wrote:

> I tested with the manufacturer's (Seagate's) utility. It came up with
> a bad sector on the disk & then fixed it. I used the memtest program
> to test RAM. This ran three times & found no errors.

OK. I would make a habit of backing your stuff up regularly. Your hard
drive might be fine and last for years or it might decide to die
tomorrow. I hope it will be the former for you, but if you back up your
data regularly if the drive dies it won't be disastrous for you.

Good luck,

Malke
--
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic!"
MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User


Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt: System32\Drivers\Ntfs.sys