Registry Defragers do they do anything ???



On Holidays
07-10-2005, 12:35 AM
Registry Defragers do they do anything ???


Not sure how big a registtery file is or how much its used in a usual
session of XP.

So would their be any benifit in defragging it ??

Thanks.

Bob I
07-10-2005, 12:35 AM
Nope

On Holidays wrote:

>
> Registry Defragers do they do anything ???
>
>
> Not sure how big a registtery file is or how much its used in a usual
> session of XP.
>
> So would their be any benifit in defragging it ??
>
> Thanks.
>

David H. Lipman
07-10-2005, 12:35 AM
From: "On Holidays" <abbyrow.com.uk>

|
| Registry Defragers do they do anything ???
|
| Not sure how big a registtery file is or how much its used in a usual
| session of XP.
|
| So would their be any benifit in defragging it ??
|
| Thanks.

Answered in Pivacy Spyware News Group.

Please learn to Cross-Post to relevant News Groups and not to Multi-Post.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm

Martin
07-10-2005, 12:35 AM
"On Holidays" <abbyrow.com.uk> wrote in message
news:3bdp815fh10ndrqo3dlk55lcrnrhlh1sda@4ax.com...
>
>
> Registry Defragers do they do anything ???
>
>
> Not sure how big a registtery file is or how much its used in a usual
> session of XP.
>
> So would their be any benifit in defragging it ??
>
> Thanks.
>

Forget the previous poster's lack of faith in such utilities....

Go to http://www.larshederer.homepage.t-online.de/erunt/ and look at the
freeware utility NTREGOPT.

Run it - it does no harm and you'll maybe see a minimal reduction in the
size of your Registry hives.

But do some (serious) uninstalls or system changes and it'll find loads of
space to compact your Registry.

It's freeware so just use it when you know that recent system changes are
likely to leave your Registry bloated.

Martin.

David H. Lipman
07-10-2005, 12:35 AM
From: "Martin" <zedolf@o2.co.uk>


| Forget the previous poster's lack of faith in such utilities....
|
| Go to http://www.larshederer.homepage.t-online.de/erunt/ and look at the
| freeware utility NTREGOPT.
|
| Run it - it does no harm and you'll maybe see a minimal reduction in the
| size of your Registry hives.
|
| But do some (serious) uninstalls or system changes and it'll find loads of
| space to compact your Registry.
|
| It's freeware so just use it when you know that recent system changes are
| likely to leave your Registry bloated.
|
| Martin.
|

A Registry Cleaner is not the same as a Registry Defragmenter.

The Registry is a Binary Tree implementation and does not fragment.

There are *many* who state that third party Registry Cleaners should not be used in WinXP.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm

07-10-2005, 12:35 AM
"On Holidays" <abbyrow.com.uk> wrote in message
news:3bdp815fh10ndrqo3dlk55lcrnrhlh1sda@4ax.com...
>
>
> Registry Defragers do they do anything ???
<snip>


When posting the same message in multiple groups, CROSS-POST!
Multiposting is rude in that it disconnects respondents from the other
copies of your same post in the other groups. The results in duplicated
replies and wasted effort by your respondents.

See your other post in the other group to which you posted (yep, you'll
have to remember it yourself but they you were the one that posted the
disconnected multi-posted message).

Martin
07-10-2005, 12:35 AM
"David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote in message
news:%23qCT3DJXFHA.2448@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> From: "Martin" <zedolf@o2.co.uk>
>
>
> | Forget the previous poster's lack of faith in such utilities....
> |
> | Go to http://www.larshederer.homepage.t-online.de/erunt/ and look at the
> | freeware utility NTREGOPT.
> |
> | Run it - it does no harm and you'll maybe see a minimal reduction in the
> | size of your Registry hives.
> |
> | But do some (serious) uninstalls or system changes and it'll find loads
> of
> | space to compact your Registry.
> |
> | It's freeware so just use it when you know that recent system changes
> are
> | likely to leave your Registry bloated.
> |
> | Martin.
> |
>
> A Registry Cleaner is not the same as a Registry Defragmenter.
>
> The Registry is a Binary Tree implementation and does not fragment.
>
> There are *many* who state that third party Registry Cleaners should not
> be used in WinXP.
>
> --
> Dave
> http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
> http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
>
>

NTREGOPT is not a(nother) registry cleaner.............

Quote: The Registry is a Binary Tree implementation and does not fragment.

That's not the story i read (mainly from internet research).
Look at the ReadMe for NTREGOPT at
http://www.larshederer.homepage.t-online.de/erunt/ntregopt.txt

More quotes:......

Similar to Windows 9x/Me, the registry files in an NT-based system
can become fragmented over time, occupying more space on your hard
disk than necessary and decreasing overall performance. You should
use the NTREGOPT utility regularly, but especially after installing
or uninstalling a program, to minimize the size of the registry files
and optimize registry access.

And that's a fact!
A deletion from the registry generally just leaves 'white-space' in the
registry.
In time this 'white-space' may be used again and wasted space negated.

Meanwhile for the purist there's...........................

NTREGOPT.

Martin.

bumtracks
07-10-2005, 12:35 AM
Erunt readme;;

Note that the program does NOT change the contents of the registry in
any way, nor does it physically defrag the registry files on the drive
(as the PageDefrag program from SysInternals does). The optimization
done by NTREGOPT is simply compacting the registry hives to the
minimum size possible.

http://www.sysinternals.com/ntw2k/freeware/pagedefrag.shtml

Ken Gardner
07-10-2005, 12:35 AM
"On Holidays" wrote:

> Registry Defragers do they do anything ???

> Not sure how big a registtery file is or how much its used in a usual
> session of XP.
>
> So would their be any benefit in defragging it ??

Not in XP. XP saves only two of the five registry hives -- I think "current
user" and "local machine" -- to your hard drive. These two hives "link" with
the other three hives, which XP creates from these two hives and then loads
into memory when you start up XP.

XP then works with the hives in RAM. This design enables lightning-fast
access to the registry, because the hives reside in super-fast RAM rather
than the much slower hard drive. When you add, modify, or delete a registry
entry, XP first changes a RAM hive and then saves that change to the linked
hive on your hard drive. As a result, your computer needs only nanoseconds
to access a "fragmented" hive in RAM. By contrast, it can take tenths of
seconds or longer to access the linked fragmented hive on your hard drive.
In any event, Disk Defragmenter and most third party defraggers defrag the
hives on the hard drive as well.

You also asked how big the registry file was. It depends on how much
software you have installed on your computer. But usually the registry is
around 20-50 MB. My understanding is that XP allocates as much as 45 MB of
RAM for registry hives. If your registry is bigger than 45 MB (highly
unlikely if you are a typical user), then I presume it flushes out the most
long-ago accessed registry entries. In any event, registry size isn't a
problem unless your computer is already starved for memory -- in which case
more RAM will help you much more than defragging your registry.

All this points to a crucial fact about XP performance. The key to optimal
performance is not software, but hardware -- namely your RAM and your CPU.
The key to speed is RAM. The more RAM you have, the more RAM XP uses to run
your OS and applications. This is a good thing, not a bad thing. Or to put
it negatively, free RAM is wasted RAM.

This is a major reason (perhaps the most important reason) why third party
system utilities, such as registry defraggers, do not help XP performance.
They will not enable a machine with 128 MB of RAM run like a machine with 512
MB of RAM. And if you already have 512 or more MB of RAM, these utilities
won’t help your CPU access code in RAM any faster. Indeed, sometimes these
system utilities may actually harm performance by interfering with how XP
manages memory. The worst offenders are memory managers, which force XP to
"free up RAM" by flushing code from super-fast RAM to your much slower hard
drive. Again, it bears repeating for emphasis: free RAM is wasted RAM.

All you need to keep your computer performing at optimal speed and stability
are XP’s own built-in tools. These tools include chkdsk, Disk Cleanup, Disk
Defragmenter, Event Viewer, Task Manager, and Regedit. If you learn how to
use them properly, you need never spend a dime on other system utilities.
Moreover, XP will run better without them than with them because they won’t
be taking up RAM, CPU cycles, or space on your hard drive.

Ken

Jim Johnson - Serenity Consulting
07-10-2005, 12:35 AM
Okay, my 2¢ worth...

I run XP Pro SP2 on two PCs. One is a desktop with 3gb CPU, a gig of
moderately fast RAM and a fairly fast HD. The other PC is an ultralite
notebook with a 1.5gb processor, 640gb of okay speed RAM and the usual slower
HD put in most notebook s.

I do hard drive tuning on both PCs:
1. clean out the crud (temp files, etc.)
2. run Norton's WinDoctor to clean-out & patch the registry (I NEVER let
WinDoctor decide on its own what to do)
3. run the mentioned NTREGOPT
4. Defrag the HD

Whenever a key is deleted in the Registry - it isn't actually deleted, just
flagged as not being used. It still takes up space. Also the keys are added
to the various files that make up the Registry in whatever order they are
entered - not the neat layout you see in Regedit. NTREGOPT writes copies of
the various registry files, writing the files in a better order and NOT
writing any of the deleted records. It then swaps the more organized, compact
files during the re-boot for the originals.

Great, wonderful. But does this DO anything for you? On my faster desktop
system, it probably isn't worth the effort (but I still do it). On the other
hand, on my relatively slower notebook system, the result of the above 4
steps is noticeable. Lag times throughout are reduced and the notebook
operation 'feels' smoother.

So, as the car ads say: your mileage may differ. And now you know why.

Jim Johnson
Serenity Consulting

"Ken Gardner" wrote:

> "On Holidays" wrote:
>
> > Registry Defragers do they do anything ???
>
> > Not sure how big a registtery file is or how much its used in a usual
> > session of XP.
> >
> > So would their be any benefit in defragging it ??
>
> Not in XP. XP saves only two of the five registry hives -- I think "current
> user" and "local machine" -- to your hard drive. These two hives "link" with
> the other three hives, which XP creates from these two hives and then loads
> into memory when you start up XP.
>
> XP then works with the hives in RAM. This design enables lightning-fast
> access to the registry, because the hives reside in super-fast RAM rather
> than the much slower hard drive. When you add, modify, or delete a registry
> entry, XP first changes a RAM hive and then saves that change to the linked
> hive on your hard drive. As a result, your computer needs only nanoseconds
> to access a "fragmented" hive in RAM. By contrast, it can take tenths of
> seconds or longer to access the linked fragmented hive on your hard drive.
> In any event, Disk Defragmenter and most third party defraggers defrag the
> hives on the hard drive as well.
>
> You also asked how big the registry file was. It depends on how much
> software you have installed on your computer. But usually the registry is
> around 20-50 MB. My understanding is that XP allocates as much as 45 MB of
> RAM for registry hives. If your registry is bigger than 45 MB (highly
> unlikely if you are a typical user), then I presume it flushes out the most
> long-ago accessed registry entries. In any event, registry size isn't a
> problem unless your computer is already starved for memory -- in which case
> more RAM will help you much more than defragging your registry.
>
> All this points to a crucial fact about XP performance. The key to optimal
> performance is not software, but hardware -- namely your RAM and your CPU.
> The key to speed is RAM. The more RAM you have, the more RAM XP uses to run
> your OS and applications. This is a good thing, not a bad thing. Or to put
> it negatively, free RAM is wasted RAM.
>
> This is a major reason (perhaps the most important reason) why third party
> system utilities, such as registry defraggers, do not help XP performance.
> They will not enable a machine with 128 MB of RAM run like a machine with 512
> MB of RAM. And if you already have 512 or more MB of RAM, these utilities
> won’t help your CPU access code in RAM any faster. Indeed, sometimes these
> system utilities may actually harm performance by interfering with how XP
> manages memory. The worst offenders are memory managers, which force XP to
> "free up RAM" by flushing code from super-fast RAM to your much slower hard
> drive. Again, it bears repeating for emphasis: free RAM is wasted RAM.
>
> All you need to keep your computer performing at optimal speed and stability
> are XP’s own built-in tools. These tools include chkdsk, Disk Cleanup, Disk
> Defragmenter, Event Viewer, Task Manager, and Regedit. If you learn how to
> use them properly, you need never spend a dime on other system utilities.
> Moreover, XP will run better without them than with them because they won’t
> be taking up RAM, CPU cycles, or space on your hard drive.
>
> Ken
>
>
>
>

Jerry Schwartz
07-10-2005, 12:35 AM
I'd like to endorse NTREGOPT for a slightly different purpose. My registry
was damaged in a way that just wouldn't go away: every time I booted up the
system, I got a message saying that my registry was corrupted and had to be
(successfully) recovered.

I came to believe that I needed to rebuild the registry from scratch, while
preserving its contents, to fix this; but I wasn't sure how to do it on
WinXP. NTREGOPT does this, and it fixed my problem (so far).

--
Regards,

Jerry Schwartz
http://www.writebynight.com
e-card JerryS https://ecardfile.com/
"Martin" <zedolf@o2.co.uk> wrote in message
news:u0F6rOJXFHA.2448@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>
> "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote in message
> news:%23qCT3DJXFHA.2448@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> From: "Martin" <zedolf@o2.co.uk>
>>
>>
>> | Forget the previous poster's lack of faith in such utilities....
>> |
>> | Go to http://www.larshederer.homepage.t-online.de/erunt/ and look at
>> the
>> | freeware utility NTREGOPT.
>> |
>> | Run it - it does no harm and you'll maybe see a minimal reduction in
>> the
>> | size of your Registry hives.
>> |
>> | But do some (serious) uninstalls or system changes and it'll find loads
>> of
>> | space to compact your Registry.
>> |
>> | It's freeware so just use it when you know that recent system changes
>> are
>> | likely to leave your Registry bloated.
>> |
>> | Martin.
>> |
>>
>> A Registry Cleaner is not the same as a Registry Defragmenter.
>>
>> The Registry is a Binary Tree implementation and does not fragment.
>>
>> There are *many* who state that third party Registry Cleaners should not
>> be used in WinXP.
>>
>> --
>> Dave
>> http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
>> http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
>>
>>
>
> NTREGOPT is not a(nother) registry cleaner.............
>
> Quote: The Registry is a Binary Tree implementation and does not fragment.
>
> That's not the story i read (mainly from internet research).
> Look at the ReadMe for NTREGOPT at
> http://www.larshederer.homepage.t-online.de/erunt/ntregopt.txt
>
> More quotes:......
>
> Similar to Windows 9x/Me, the registry files in an NT-based system
> can become fragmented over time, occupying more space on your hard
> disk than necessary and decreasing overall performance. You should
> use the NTREGOPT utility regularly, but especially after installing
> or uninstalling a program, to minimize the size of the registry files
> and optimize registry access.
>
> And that's a fact!
> A deletion from the registry generally just leaves 'white-space' in the
> registry.
> In time this 'white-space' may be used again and wasted space negated.
>
> Meanwhile for the purist there's...........................
>
> NTREGOPT.
>
> Martin.
>
>
>
>
>
>


Registry Defragers do they do anything ???