RE: workgroups



Harry
07-09-2005, 11:32 PM
Thank you for the info BAR, my problem is that I don't know how to set up
these domains. My problem is that I would like to centralize my user accounts.

"BAR" wrote:

> Are you confusing a Workgroup with a Domain?
>
> A domain is a group of accounts and network resources that share a common
> directory database and set of security policies, and might have security
> relationships with other domains.
>
> Domains are the recommended choice for all networks except very small ones
> with few users.
>
> A workgroup is a more basic grouping, intended only to help users find
> objects such as printers and shared folders within that group.
>
> In a workgroup, users might have to remember multiple passwords, one for
> each network resource. (In addition, different users can use different
> passwords for each resource.)
>
> In a domain, passwords and permissions are simpler to keep track of, because
> a domain has a single, centralized database of user accounts, permissions,
> and other network details. The information in this database is replicated
> automatically among domain controllers. You determine which servers are
> domain controllers and which are simply members of the domain. You can
> determine these roles not only during Setup but afterward.
>
> A workgroup can contain computers running one of the Microsoft Windows NT
> and Windows 2000 Server products as long as the server is not configured as a
> domain controller. In a workgroup, a computer running Windows NT or Windows
> 2000 Server is called a stand-alone server.
>
> Because workgroups have decentralized administration and security, the
> following are true:
> A user must have a user account on each computer to which he or she wants to
> gain access.
>
> Any changes to user accounts, such as changing a user's password or adding a
> new user account, must be made on each computer in the workgroup. If you
> forget to add a new user account to one of the computers in your workgroup,
> the new user will not be able to log on to that computer and will be unable
> to access resources on it.
>
> A workgroup provides the following advantages:
> It does not require inclusion of a domain controller in the configuration to
> hold centralized security information.
>
> It is simple to design and implement. It does not require the extensive
> planning and administration that a domain requires.
>
> It is a convenient networking environment for a limited number of computers
> in close proximity. However, a workgroup becomes impractical in environments
> with more than 10 computers.
>
>
> "Confused XP User" wrote:
>
> > Does XP have an easy way to switch between workgroups? As
> > far as I know, a computer can only be part of one
> > workgroup at a time, and in order to join another
> > workgroup, you either have to run the network setup wizard
> > or type the name of the new workgroup in the computer name
> > tab of system properties. Can XP "remember" past workgroup
> > settings so you can make the switch more easily?
> >


RE: workgroups