Need help with Parental control issues



Jdona
07-10-2005, 12:30 AM
I have an adult child that refuses to log off the computer at a reasonable
hour. Rather than continuing to argue, I am trying to find a way to set an
automatic shut off that will shut the computer down at a specified time, say
12:30 am. I have a Dell 4550 with Windows XP. Does anyone know how to do
that?
--
JT

Alias
07-10-2005, 12:30 AM
"Jdona" <Jdona@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote

>I have an adult child that refuses to log off the computer at a reasonable
> hour. Rather than continuing to argue, I am trying to find a way to set an
> automatic shut off that will shut the computer down at a specified time,
> say
> 12:30 am. I have a Dell 4550 with Windows XP. Does anyone know how to do
> that?
> --
> JT

Can't be done. Even if it could be done, your son would only have to hit the
ON button on the case ... You will have to learn how to communicate with
your son and this isn't the forum to learn that.

Alias

kurttrail
07-10-2005, 12:30 AM
Jdona wrote:
> I have an adult child that refuses to log off the computer at a
> reasonable hour. Rather than continuing to argue, I am trying to find
> a way to set an automatic shut off that will shut the computer down
> at a specified time, say 12:30 am. I have a Dell 4550 with Windows
> XP. Does anyone know how to do that?

Cut the apron strings, and tell the adult to move out.

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Jdona
07-10-2005, 12:30 AM
Thank you for the psychological evaluation, but that doesn't address my
question. I've spoken to both Dell and my internet provider who says there
is a feature in XP called Lock Down that would do it, but they didn't know
where to find it. Has anyone heard of this?
--
JT


"Alias" wrote:

>
> "Jdona" <Jdona@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote
>
> >I have an adult child that refuses to log off the computer at a reasonable
> > hour. Rather than continuing to argue, I am trying to find a way to set an
> > automatic shut off that will shut the computer down at a specified time,
> > say
> > 12:30 am. I have a Dell 4550 with Windows XP. Does anyone know how to do
> > that?
> > --
> > JT
>
> Can't be done. Even if it could be done, your son would only have to hit the
> ON button on the case ... You will have to learn how to communicate with
> your son and this isn't the forum to learn that.
>
> Alias
>
>
>

Alias
07-10-2005, 12:30 AM
"Jdona" <Jdona@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:8E650524-4E07-4CF3-8EC5-6AD0944BB03F@microsoft.com...
> Thank you for the psychological evaluation, but that doesn't address my
> question. I've spoken to both Dell and my internet provider who says
> there
> is a feature in XP called Lock Down that would do it, but they didn't know
> where to find it. Has anyone heard of this?
> --
> JT

Won't work. All he has to do is reboot and he's back in business. I made no
psychological evaluation. Dell doesn't know where to find Lock Down and had
no suggestions? Another reason not to buy a Dell.

Alias
>
>
> "Alias" wrote:
>
>>
>> "Jdona" <Jdona@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote
>>
>> >I have an adult child that refuses to log off the computer at a
>> >reasonable
>> > hour. Rather than continuing to argue, I am trying to find a way to set
>> > an
>> > automatic shut off that will shut the computer down at a specified
>> > time,
>> > say
>> > 12:30 am. I have a Dell 4550 with Windows XP. Does anyone know how to
>> > do
>> > that?
>> > --
>> > JT
>>
>> Can't be done. Even if it could be done, your son would only have to hit
>> the
>> ON button on the case ... You will have to learn how to communicate with
>> your son and this isn't the forum to learn that.
>>
>> Alias
>>
>>
>>

Richard Urban
07-10-2005, 12:30 AM
Anything that you can do, short of locking the computer away, can be undone.
That is why many companies place their computer servers in a locked and air
conditioned room.

--
Regards,

Richard Urban

aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

If you knew as much as you think you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


"Jdona" <Jdona@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:29F34A33-3BC3-4208-BBC9-49F1A275CC65@microsoft.com...
>I have an adult child that refuses to log off the computer at a reasonable
> hour. Rather than continuing to argue, I am trying to find a way to set an
> automatic shut off that will shut the computer down at a specified time,
> say
> 12:30 am. I have a Dell 4550 with Windows XP. Does anyone know how to do
> that?
> --
> JT

Torgeir Bakken \(MVP\)
07-10-2005, 12:31 AM
Jdona wrote:

> I have an adult child that refuses to log off the computer at a reasonable
> hour. Rather than continuing to argue, I am trying to find a way to set an
> automatic shut off that will shut the computer down at a specified time, say
> 12:30 am. I have a Dell 4550 with Windows XP. Does anyone know how to do
> that?
Hi,

Some 3rd party programs that should do the job:


1st Security Center
http://www.1securitycenter.com/sc/index.html

<quote>
The powerful feature "User Working Time" allows you to limit working
time for your children , office colleagues , students and so on. You
can define several time intervals and time durations to manage users
working time very easy.
</quote>


User Time Control
http://www.1securitycenter.com/utcc/index.html

<quote>
It allows you to set limits on how much time your child spends on the
computer or online. User Time Control Center lets you specify when
exactly and how long the computer can be used and define users which
will be allowed to use the computer without any limits.
</quote>


WatchDog
http://www.softpedia.com/get/Security/Lockdown/WatchDog.shtml

<quote>
WatchDog 8.3 is the ultimate application to restrict and monitor the
time that you or others spend on the computer. Each user can have
their timing period based on daily, weekly, monthly or unlimited.
WatchDog's security measures block out unauthorized access completely.
</quote>



--
torgeir, Microsoft MVP Scripting and WMI, Porsgrunn Norway
Administration scripting examples and an ONLINE version of
the 1328 page Scripting Guide:
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/scriptcenter/default.mspx

andy smart
07-10-2005, 12:31 AM
Alias wrote:
> "Jdona" <Jdona@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:8E650524-4E07-4CF3-8EC5-6AD0944BB03F@microsoft.com...
>
>>Thank you for the psychological evaluation, but that doesn't address my
>>question. I've spoken to both Dell and my internet provider who says
>>there
>>is a feature in XP called Lock Down that would do it, but they didn't know
>>where to find it. Has anyone heard of this?
>>--
>>JT
>
>
> Won't work. All he has to do is reboot and he's back in business. I made no
> psychological evaluation. Dell doesn't know where to find Lock Down and had
> no suggestions? Another reason not to buy a Dell.
>
> Alias
>
>>
>>"Alias" wrote:
>>
>>
>>>"Jdona" <Jdona@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote
>>>
>>>
>>>>I have an adult child that refuses to log off the computer at a
>>>>reasonable
>>>>hour. Rather than continuing to argue, I am trying to find a way to set
>>>>an
>>>>automatic shut off that will shut the computer down at a specified
>>>>time,
>>>>say
>>>>12:30 am. I have a Dell 4550 with Windows XP. Does anyone know how to
>>>>do
>>>>that?
>>>>--
>>>>JT
>>>
>>>Can't be done. Even if it could be done, your son would only have to hit
>>>the
>>>ON button on the case ... You will have to learn how to communicate with
>>>your son and this isn't the forum to learn that.
>>>
>>>Alias
>>>
>>>
>>>
>
>
>
I wonder if the BIOS allows for a boot password? Then if it rebooted
then only the "authorised adult" could re-start it. Of course it could
always be cracked with software for that purpose...

kurttrail
07-10-2005, 12:31 AM
"andy smart" <anonymus@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:1116268984.12810.0@nnrp-t71-02.news.clara.net...

> I wonder if the BIOS allows for a boot password? Then if it rebooted
> then only the "authorised adult" could re-start it. Of course it could
> always be cracked with software for that purpose...

Maxwell's nephew?

Would you believe that a BIOS password only puts a stumbling block at
getting into the BIOS?

Would you believe clearing the CMOS resets the BIOS and its password?

Would you believe that keeping you trap shut is the best way to hide
your ignorance?

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

andy smart
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
kurttrail wrote:
> "andy smart" <anonymus@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:1116268984.12810.0@nnrp-t71-02.news.clara.net...
>
>
>>I wonder if the BIOS allows for a boot password? Then if it rebooted
>>then only the "authorised adult" could re-start it. Of course it could
>>always be cracked with software for that purpose...
>
>
> Maxwell's nephew?
>
> Would you believe that a BIOS password only puts a stumbling block at
> getting into the BIOS?
>
> Would you believe clearing the CMOS resets the BIOS and its password?
>
> Would you believe that keeping you trap shut is the best way to hide
> your ignorance?
>
I would be grateful if you would refrain from personal abuse in your
posts please. I did clearly state that this could be worked around with
a BIOS password cracking program.

kurttrail
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
andy smart wrote:
> kurttrail wrote:
>> "andy smart" <anonymus@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:1116268984.12810.0@nnrp-t71-02.news.clara.net...
>>
>>
>>> I wonder if the BIOS allows for a boot password? Then if it rebooted
>>> then only the "authorised adult" could re-start it. Of course it
>>> could always be cracked with software for that purpose...
>>
>>
>> Maxwell's nephew?
>>
>> Would you believe that a BIOS password only puts a stumbling block at
>> getting into the BIOS?
>>
>> Would you believe clearing the CMOS resets the BIOS and its password?
>>
>> Would you believe that keeping you trap shut is the best way to hide
>> your ignorance?
>>
> I would be grateful if you would refrain from personal abuse in your
> posts please.

What personal abuse? I ask I series of questions, that were sort of
play on the old TV series "Get Smart."

> I did clearly state that this could be worked around
> with a BIOS password cracking program.

Which is totally ridiculous! All one needs to do is reset the CMOS, no
cracking program needed.

And if I were just trying to personally abuse you for your obvious
ingnorance, I'd just call you an ignoramus, and be done with it. I much
rather engage in humor, than just mere abuse.

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

andy smart
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
kurttrail wrote:
> andy smart wrote:
>
>>kurttrail wrote:
>>
>>>"andy smart" <anonymus@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>>>news:1116268984.12810.0@nnrp-t71-02.news.clara.net...
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>I wonder if the BIOS allows for a boot password? Then if it rebooted
>>>>then only the "authorised adult" could re-start it. Of course it
>>>>could always be cracked with software for that purpose...
>>>
>>>
>>>Maxwell's nephew?
>>>
>>>Would you believe that a BIOS password only puts a stumbling block at
>>>getting into the BIOS?
>>>
>>>Would you believe clearing the CMOS resets the BIOS and its password?
>>>

>>>
>>
>>I would be grateful if you would refrain from personal abuse in your
>>posts please.
>
>
> What personal abuse? I ask I series of questions, that were sort of
> play on the old TV series "Get Smart."
>
>
>>I did clearly state that this could be worked around
>>with a BIOS password cracking program.
>
>
> Which is totally ridiculous! All one needs to do is reset the CMOS, no
> cracking program needed.
>
> And if I were just trying to personally abuse you for your obvious
> ingnorance, I'd just call you an ignoramus, and be done with it. I much
> rather engage in humor, than just mere abuse.
>

I was working on the principal that any thing the original poster could
do might be a help - sure the 'offspring' could open the case and remove
the CMOS battery, or use BIOS password software or whatever. But they
might just not be able to do that in which case it would be appropriate
security at this time and in this case. Sure, I don't know everything,
but I felt that in this case I could offer an idea, with which you did
not agree.

Where I come from "Would you believe that keeping you trap shut is the
best way to hide your ignorance?" would count as being abuse. If one of
our students used language like this to another students we'd pull them
up for being inappropriate.

Surely, if you wish to "engage in humor" as you put it by including
things from TV series, then you need to make sure that this is a common
cultural reference for all; otherwise don't you just appear rude those
who have not seen the said series. Please accept my apologies for not
recognizing that calling me ignorent in this way was humour, and that by
not calling me an ignoramus you were showing politeness.

kurttrail
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
andy smart wrote:
> kurttrail wrote:
>> andy smart wrote:
>>
>>> kurttrail wrote:
>>>
>>>> "andy smart" <anonymus@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:1116268984.12810.0@nnrp-t71-02.news.clara.net...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> I wonder if the BIOS allows for a boot password? Then if it
>>>>> rebooted then only the "authorised adult" could re-start it. Of
>>>>> course it could always be cracked with software for that
>>>>> purpose...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Maxwell's nephew?
>>>>
>>>> Would you believe that a BIOS password only puts a stumbling block
>>>> at getting into the BIOS?
>>>>
>>>> Would you believe clearing the CMOS resets the BIOS and its
>>>> password?
>>>>
>
>>>>
>>>
>>> I would be grateful if you would refrain from personal abuse in your
>>> posts please.
>>
>>
>> What personal abuse? I ask I series of questions, that were sort of
>> play on the old TV series "Get Smart."
>>
>>
>>> I did clearly state that this could be worked around
>>> with a BIOS password cracking program.
>>
>>
>> Which is totally ridiculous! All one needs to do is reset the CMOS,
>> no cracking program needed.
>>
>> And if I were just trying to personally abuse you for your obvious
>> ingnorance, I'd just call you an ignoramus, and be done with it. I
>> much rather engage in humor, than just mere abuse.
>>
>
> I was working on the principal that any thing the original poster
> could do might be a help - sure the 'offspring' could open the case
> and remove the CMOS battery, or use BIOS password software or
> whatever. But they might just not be able to do that in which case it
> would be appropriate security at this time and in this case. Sure, I
> don't know everything, but I felt that in this case I could offer an
> idea, with which you did not agree.

I think it is a total waste of time. All a BIOS password does is
password protect the BIOS, not access to booting the computer. And it
is easily bypassed, and that info is just way to easy to find out.
Hell, post the question of how to reset a BIOS password here and you'll
get at least 3 or 4 replies.

>
> Where I come from "Would you believe that keeping you trap shut is the
> best way to hide your ignorance?" would count as being abuse.

LOL! Where do you come from? Your mother's womb or a test tube?

The abuse would be dependant on your answer to the question, and that is
a part of you, not me.

Ignorance is NOT a derogatory term. Only the ignorant wrongly believe
that it is.

> If one
> of our students used language like this to another students we'd
> pull them up for being inappropriate.

LOL! And that is why you would be a poor teacher. Teaching kids that
totally innocuous humor is inappropriate. And even if inappropriate to
you, have you ever heard about the first amendment? You should be
teaching the little brats about that! That even if speach is considered
inappropriate by some segments of society, our constitution protects
that speech!

Or are you in the business of churning out little conformists who are
too afraid to think and say what they believe?!

>
> Surely, if you wish to "engage in humor" as you put it by including
> things from TV series, then you need to make sure that this is a
> common cultural reference for all;

It was for anyone above the age of 40 or so. Or watched the reruns of
it on cable.

But I do find it interesting when you don't understand something, your
natural reaction is to feel abuse by it.

And as you have clearly demonstrated, we have no cultural common
denominator.

I prefer Howard Stern, while you prefer the culture of the male horse
milking George W. Bush!

> otherwise don't you just appear
> rude those who have not seen the said series.

I fully accept and understand that at least 50% of people don't
understand some of my obsure references in my humor. Big Deal. That
still leaves those that do.

> Please accept my
> apologies for not recognizing that calling me ignorent in this way
> was humour, and that by not calling me an ignoramus you were showing
> politeness.

No apology is necessary, as I'm not one to take offense at such
silliness.

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

andy smart
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
kurttrail wrote:

> I think it is a total waste of time. All a BIOS password does is
> password protect the BIOS, not access to booting the computer. And it
> is easily bypassed, and that info is just way to easy to find out.
> Hell, post the question of how to reset a BIOS password here and you'll
> get at least 3 or 4 replies.
>

I'm fairly sure that many of the computers we've had here on site will
allow the additon of a BIOS password which kicks in at boot (several of
the students will put one on if we don't password the BIOS security
settings) - maybe not all systems have this, I don't know. I've spent
many a happy hour re-setting them by changing mainboard jumpers or
removing the battery or using software. But hey I was able and willing
to put the time in.

kurttrail
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
andy smart wrote:
> kurttrail wrote:
>
>> I think it is a total waste of time. All a BIOS password does is
>> password protect the BIOS, not access to booting the computer. And
>> it is easily bypassed, and that info is just way to easy to find out.
>> Hell, post the question of how to reset a BIOS password here and
>> you'll get at least 3 or 4 replies.
>>
>
> I'm fairly sure that many of the computers we've had here on site will
> allow the additon of a BIOS password which kicks in at boot (several
> of the students will put one on if we don't password the BIOS security
> settings) - maybe not all systems have this, I don't know. I've spent
> many a happy hour re-setting them by changing mainboard jumpers or
> removing the battery or using software. But hey I was able and willing
> to put the time in.

Are you saying that just to turn on a computer and get it to go past the
Post screen a password must be inputted? And this must be done for
every computer? And then one would presume that then you'll also have
passwords to get users into windows too, so to get a computer working
two passwords need to inputted for every computer?

That is not the way most BIOS passwords work. Most only need to be
inputted to get into the BIOS to change its settings.

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

andy smart
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
kurttrail wrote:
> andy smart wrote:
>
>>kurttrail wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I think it is a total waste of time. All a BIOS password does is
>>>password protect the BIOS, not access to booting the computer. And
>>>it is easily bypassed, and that info is just way to easy to find out.
>>>Hell, post the question of how to reset a BIOS password here and
>>>you'll get at least 3 or 4 replies.
>>>
>>
>>I'm fairly sure that many of the computers we've had here on site will
>>allow the additon of a BIOS password which kicks in at boot (several
>>of the students will put one on if we don't password the BIOS security
>>settings) - maybe not all systems have this, I don't know. I've spent
>>many a happy hour re-setting them by changing mainboard jumpers or
>>removing the battery or using software. But hey I was able and willing
>>to put the time in.
>
>
> Are you saying that just to turn on a computer and get it to go past the
> Post screen a password must be inputted? And this must be done for
> every computer? And then one would presume that then you'll also have
> passwords to get users into windows too, so to get a computer working
> two passwords need to inputted for every computer?
>
> That is not the way most BIOS passwords work. Most only need to be
> inputted to get into the BIOS to change its settings.
>

I just checked on one of our Dell GX270s - the BIOS will allow you to
configure a system password which has to be inputted before the machine
will boot. So my thinking was that if the original poster made sure that
it would always boot from the hard disk first (to avoid booting from a
diskette) then that might help. Our Dells also have a loop to allow the
chassis to be padlocked shut (which should reduce the risk of the CMOS
battery being removed or jumpers altered to reset the password).

Steve N.
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
kurttrail wrote:

> andy smart wrote:
>
>>kurttrail wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I think it is a total waste of time. All a BIOS password does is
>>>password protect the BIOS, not access to booting the computer. And
>>>it is easily bypassed, and that info is just way to easy to find out.
>>>Hell, post the question of how to reset a BIOS password here and
>>>you'll get at least 3 or 4 replies.
>>>
>>
>>I'm fairly sure that many of the computers we've had here on site will
>>allow the additon of a BIOS password which kicks in at boot (several
>>of the students will put one on if we don't password the BIOS security
>>settings) - maybe not all systems have this, I don't know. I've spent
>>many a happy hour re-setting them by changing mainboard jumpers or
>>removing the battery or using software. But hey I was able and willing
>>to put the time in.
>
>
> Are you saying that just to turn on a computer and get it to go past the
> Post screen a password must be inputted? And this must be done for
> every computer? And then one would presume that then you'll also have
> passwords to get users into windows too, so to get a computer working
> two passwords need to inputted for every computer?
>
> That is not the way most BIOS passwords work. Most only need to be
> inputted to get into the BIOS to change its settings.
>

Depends whether the BIOS security option is set to System or User in
most BIOSes I've seen that last several years. If set to System it
behaves as you say, if set to User then a password must be entered to
boot up.

Steve

kurttrail
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
andy smart wrote:
> kurttrail wrote:
>> andy smart wrote:
>>
>>> kurttrail wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> I think it is a total waste of time. All a BIOS password does is
>>>> password protect the BIOS, not access to booting the computer. And
>>>> it is easily bypassed, and that info is just way to easy to find
>>>> out. Hell, post the question of how to reset a BIOS password here
>>>> and you'll get at least 3 or 4 replies.
>>>>
>>>
>>> I'm fairly sure that many of the computers we've had here on site
>>> will allow the additon of a BIOS password which kicks in at boot
>>> (several of the students will put one on if we don't password the
>>> BIOS security settings) - maybe not all systems have this, I don't
>>> know. I've spent many a happy hour re-setting them by changing
>>> mainboard jumpers or removing the battery or using software. But
>>> hey I was able and willing to put the time in.
>>
>>
>> Are you saying that just to turn on a computer and get it to go past
>> the Post screen a password must be inputted? And this must be done
>> for every computer? And then one would presume that then you'll
>> also have passwords to get users into windows too, so to get a
>> computer working two passwords need to inputted for every computer?
>>
>> That is not the way most BIOS passwords work. Most only need to be
>> inputted to get into the BIOS to change its settings.
>>
>
> I just checked on one of our Dell GX270s - the BIOS will allow you to
> configure a system password which has to be inputted before the
> machine will boot. So my thinking was that if the original poster
> made sure that it would always boot from the hard disk first (to
> avoid booting from a diskette) then that might help. Our Dells also
> have a loop to allow the chassis to be padlocked shut (which should
> reduce the risk of the CMOS battery being removed or jumpers altered
> to reset the password).

OK Dell does have both a setup password and a system password. Not all
computer BIOSs do.

So how is that gonna turn off the computer at 12:30am, as the OP asked?

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

andy smart
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
kurttrail wrote:
> andy smart wrote:
>
>>kurttrail wrote:
>>
>>>andy smart wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>kurttrail wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I think it is a total waste of time. All a BIOS password does is
>>>>>password protect the BIOS, not access to booting the computer. And
>>>>>it is easily bypassed, and that info is just way to easy to find
>>>>>out. Hell, post the question of how to reset a BIOS password here
>>>>>and you'll get at least 3 or 4 replies.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>I'm fairly sure that many of the computers we've had here on site
>>>>will allow the additon of a BIOS password which kicks in at boot
>>>>(several of the students will put one on if we don't password the
>>>>BIOS security settings) - maybe not all systems have this, I don't
>>>>know. I've spent many a happy hour re-setting them by changing
>>>>mainboard jumpers or removing the battery or using software. But
>>>>hey I was able and willing to put the time in.
>>>
>>>
>>>Are you saying that just to turn on a computer and get it to go past
>>>the Post screen a password must be inputted? And this must be done
>>>for every computer? And then one would presume that then you'll
>>>also have passwords to get users into windows too, so to get a
>>>computer working two passwords need to inputted for every computer?
>>>
>>>That is not the way most BIOS passwords work. Most only need to be
>>>inputted to get into the BIOS to change its settings.
>>>
>>
>>I just checked on one of our Dell GX270s - the BIOS will allow you to
>>configure a system password which has to be inputted before the
>>machine will boot. So my thinking was that if the original poster
>>made sure that it would always boot from the hard disk first (to
>>avoid booting from a diskette) then that might help. Our Dells also
>>have a loop to allow the chassis to be padlocked shut (which should
>>reduce the risk of the CMOS battery being removed or jumpers altered
>>to reset the password).
>
>
> OK Dell does have both a setup password and a system password. Not all
> computer BIOSs do.
>
> So how is that gonna turn off the computer at 12:30am, as the OP asked?
>

Well, it's not - I admit that. I was building on the points made by
Alias about the fact that if she could find a way to automate the
shutdown then all the son need to was to reboot it.

XP does allow you to force a shutdown using a scheduled job though, and
if the son had to log in with an account which did not have the ability
to cancel sheduled tasks the two together might present a solution.

kurttrail
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
Steve N. wrote:
> kurttrail wrote:
>
>> andy smart wrote:
>>
>>> kurttrail wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> I think it is a total waste of time. All a BIOS password does is
>>>> password protect the BIOS, not access to booting the computer. And
>>>> it is easily bypassed, and that info is just way to easy to find
>>>> out. Hell, post the question of how to reset a BIOS password here
>>>> and you'll get at least 3 or 4 replies.
>>>>
>>>
>>> I'm fairly sure that many of the computers we've had here on site
>>> will allow the additon of a BIOS password which kicks in at boot
>>> (several of the students will put one on if we don't password the
>>> BIOS security settings) - maybe not all systems have this, I don't
>>> know. I've spent many a happy hour re-setting them by changing
>>> mainboard jumpers or removing the battery or using software. But
>>> hey I was able and willing to put the time in.
>>
>>
>> Are you saying that just to turn on a computer and get it to go past
>> the Post screen a password must be inputted? And this must be done
>> for every computer? And then one would presume that then you'll
>> also have passwords to get users into windows too, so to get a
>> computer working two passwords need to inputted for every computer?
>>
>> That is not the way most BIOS passwords work. Most only need to be
>> inputted to get into the BIOS to change its settings.
>>
>
> Depends whether the BIOS security option is set to System or User in
> most BIOSes I've seen that last several years. If set to System it
> behaves as you say, if set to User then a password must be entered to
> boot up.
>
> Steve

And either way, easily reset. Yeah, I had forgotten that many OEM
BIOS's have system passwords.

--
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Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
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"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

kurttrail
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
andy smart wrote:
> kurttrail wrote:
>> andy smart wrote:
>>
>>> kurttrail wrote:
>>>
>>>> andy smart wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> kurttrail wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> I think it is a total waste of time. All a BIOS password does is
>>>>>> password protect the BIOS, not access to booting the computer.
>>>>>> And it is easily bypassed, and that info is just way to easy to
>>>>>> find out. Hell, post the question of how to reset a BIOS
>>>>>> password here and you'll get at least 3 or 4 replies.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm fairly sure that many of the computers we've had here on site
>>>>> will allow the additon of a BIOS password which kicks in at boot
>>>>> (several of the students will put one on if we don't password the
>>>>> BIOS security settings) - maybe not all systems have this, I don't
>>>>> know. I've spent many a happy hour re-setting them by changing
>>>>> mainboard jumpers or removing the battery or using software. But
>>>>> hey I was able and willing to put the time in.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Are you saying that just to turn on a computer and get it to go
>>>> past the Post screen a password must be inputted? And this must
>>>> be done for every computer? And then one would presume that then
>>>> you'll also have passwords to get users into windows too, so to
>>>> get a computer working two passwords need to inputted for every
>>>> computer?
>>>>
>>>> That is not the way most BIOS passwords work. Most only need to be
>>>> inputted to get into the BIOS to change its settings.
>>>>
>>>
>>> I just checked on one of our Dell GX270s - the BIOS will allow you
>>> to configure a system password which has to be inputted before the
>>> machine will boot. So my thinking was that if the original poster
>>> made sure that it would always boot from the hard disk first (to
>>> avoid booting from a diskette) then that might help. Our Dells also
>>> have a loop to allow the chassis to be padlocked shut (which should
>>> reduce the risk of the CMOS battery being removed or jumpers altered
>>> to reset the password).
>>
>>
>> OK Dell does have both a setup password and a system password. Not
>> all computer BIOSs do.
>>
>> So how is that gonna turn off the computer at 12:30am, as the OP
>> asked?
>>
>
> Well, it's not - I admit that. I was building on the points made by
> Alias about the fact that if she could find a way to automate the
> shutdown then all the son need to was to reboot it.
>
> XP does allow you to force a shutdown using a scheduled job though,
> and if the son had to log in with an account which did not have the
> ability to cancel sheduled tasks the two together might present a
> solution.

LOL! Totally flawed, and one which an adult will easily find away
around, if he/she already doesn't respect his/her mother enough to get
off the computer when she asks in the first place.

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

andy smart
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
kurttrail wrote:
> andy smart wrote:
>
>>kurttrail wrote:
>>
>>>andy smart wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>kurttrail wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>andy smart wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>kurttrail wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>I think it is a total waste of time. All a BIOS password does is
>>>>>>>password protect the BIOS, not access to booting the computer.
>>>>>>>And it is easily bypassed, and that info is just way to easy to
>>>>>>>find out. Hell, post the question of how to reset a BIOS
>>>>>>>password here and you'll get at least 3 or 4 replies.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>I'm fairly sure that many of the computers we've had here on site
>>>>>>will allow the additon of a BIOS password which kicks in at boot
>>>>>>(several of the students will put one on if we don't password the
>>>>>>BIOS security settings) - maybe not all systems have this, I don't
>>>>>>know. I've spent many a happy hour re-setting them by changing
>>>>>>mainboard jumpers or removing the battery or using software. But
>>>>>>hey I was able and willing to put the time in.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>Are you saying that just to turn on a computer and get it to go
>>>>>past the Post screen a password must be inputted? And this must
>>>>>be done for every computer? And then one would presume that then
>>>>>you'll also have passwords to get users into windows too, so to
>>>>>get a computer working two passwords need to inputted for every
>>>>>computer?
>>>>>
>>>>>That is not the way most BIOS passwords work. Most only need to be
>>>>>inputted to get into the BIOS to change its settings.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>I just checked on one of our Dell GX270s - the BIOS will allow you
>>>>to configure a system password which has to be inputted before the
>>>>machine will boot. So my thinking was that if the original poster
>>>>made sure that it would always boot from the hard disk first (to
>>>>avoid booting from a diskette) then that might help. Our Dells also
>>>>have a loop to allow the chassis to be padlocked shut (which should
>>>>reduce the risk of the CMOS battery being removed or jumpers altered
>>>>to reset the password).
>>>
>>>
>>>OK Dell does have both a setup password and a system password. Not
>>>all computer BIOSs do.
>>>
>>>So how is that gonna turn off the computer at 12:30am, as the OP
>>>asked?
>>>
>>
>>Well, it's not - I admit that. I was building on the points made by
>>Alias about the fact that if she could find a way to automate the
>>shutdown then all the son need to was to reboot it.
>>
>>XP does allow you to force a shutdown using a scheduled job though,
>>and if the son had to log in with an account which did not have the
>>ability to cancel sheduled tasks the two together might present a
>>solution.
>
>
> LOL! Totally flawed, and one which an adult will easily find away
> around, if he/she already doesn't respect his/her mother enough to get
> off the computer when she asks in the first place.
>
OK, Kurttrail - you're right.

There is no perfect and total solution to this problem.

I was mearly attempting some form of solution, even if it's not perfect;
myself I'd rather have half as solution which might work a bit rather
than none at all.

kurttrail
07-10-2005, 12:32 AM
andy smart wrote:
> kurttrail wrote:
>> andy smart wrote:
>>
>>> kurttrail wrote:
>>>
>>>> andy smart wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> kurttrail wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> andy smart wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> kurttrail wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I think it is a total waste of time. All a BIOS password does
>>>>>>>> is password protect the BIOS, not access to booting the
>>>>>>>> computer. And it is easily bypassed, and that info is just way
>>>>>>>> to easy to find out. Hell, post the question of how to reset a
>>>>>>>> BIOS password here and you'll get at least 3 or 4 replies.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I'm fairly sure that many of the computers we've had here on
>>>>>>> site will allow the additon of a BIOS password which kicks in
>>>>>>> at boot (several of the students will put one on if we don't
>>>>>>> password the BIOS security settings) - maybe not all systems
>>>>>>> have this, I don't know. I've spent many a happy hour
>>>>>>> re-setting them by changing mainboard jumpers or removing the
>>>>>>> battery or using software. But hey I was able and willing to
>>>>>>> put the time in.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Are you saying that just to turn on a computer and get it to go
>>>>>> past the Post screen a password must be inputted? And this must
>>>>>> be done for every computer? And then one would presume that then
>>>>>> you'll also have passwords to get users into windows too, so to
>>>>>> get a computer working two passwords need to inputted for every
>>>>>> computer?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> That is not the way most BIOS passwords work. Most only need to
>>>>>> be inputted to get into the BIOS to change its settings.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> I just checked on one of our Dell GX270s - the BIOS will allow you
>>>>> to configure a system password which has to be inputted before the
>>>>> machine will boot. So my thinking was that if the original poster
>>>>> made sure that it would always boot from the hard disk first (to
>>>>> avoid booting from a diskette) then that might help. Our Dells
>>>>> also have a loop to allow the chassis to be padlocked shut (which
>>>>> should reduce the risk of the CMOS battery being removed or
>>>>> jumpers altered to reset the password).
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> OK Dell does have both a setup password and a system password. Not
>>>> all computer BIOSs do.
>>>>
>>>> So how is that gonna turn off the computer at 12:30am, as the OP
>>>> asked?
>>>>
>>>
>>> Well, it's not - I admit that. I was building on the points made by
>>> Alias about the fact that if she could find a way to automate the
>>> shutdown then all the son need to was to reboot it.
>>>
>>> XP does allow you to force a shutdown using a scheduled job though,
>>> and if the son had to log in with an account which did not have the
>>> ability to cancel sheduled tasks the two together might present a
>>> solution.
>>
>>
>> LOL! Totally flawed, and one which an adult will easily find away
>> around, if he/she already doesn't respect his/her mother enough to
>> get off the computer when she asks in the first place.
>>
> OK, Kurttrail - you're right.
>
> There is no perfect and total solution to this problem.
>
> I was mearly attempting some form of solution, even if it's not
> perfect; myself I'd rather have half as solution which might work a
> bit rather than none at all.

It's amazing to me what some people will accept.

Tell the adult to get out of the house. No technology needed. If the
person doesn't respect her rules, no matter what she does, it is likely
that it will be gotten around.

The adult child would have to break the law to use the computer.

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

NobodyMan
07-10-2005, 12:35 AM
On Mon, 16 May 2005 06:36:02 -0700, "Jdona"
<Jdona@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>I have an adult child that refuses to log off the computer at a reasonable
>hour. Rather than continuing to argue, I am trying to find a way to set an
>automatic shut off that will shut the computer down at a specified time, say
>12:30 am. I have a Dell 4550 with Windows XP. Does anyone know how to do
>that?

What, exactly, is an "adult child?"

And why won't they just follow the directions of their parent(s)?
Dear Lord has society changed. When my mom/dad gave me a direct
command, I followed it, I didn't argue about it incessantly.


Need help with Parental control issues