OEM and Standard windows - What are the differences?



Matt Buxton
07-09-2005, 11:28 PM
I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences between
the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the standard are.
Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small number of
hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?

Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system? Or
is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running an OEM
version of windows xp?

Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I appreciate
it.

Matt

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:28 PM
"Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:DtHhe.413596$R24.375124@fe05!news.easynews.com...
>I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences between
>the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the standard are.
>Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small number of
>hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?

No, the only real difference is the price, despite all the FUD other posters
may try to lay on you.
>
> Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
> reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
> etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
> basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
> input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system? Or
> is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running an
> OEM version of windows xp?

Yes.
>
> Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I appreciate
> it.
>
> Matt

Anytime.

Alias

Doug Knox MS-MVP
07-09-2005, 11:28 PM
Alias has given you some incorrect information.

OEM versions will not perform an upgrade install, only clean installations. Retail versions, full or upgrade, will upgrade an existing installation (98 or higher).

OEM versions are not entitled to any free support from Microsoft, other than what might be offered for Service Pack installs and the like.

As far as using your CD's to create slipstreamed discs, this may not work. There are files that are included in the Setup that tell it whether its OEM, VLK or Retail. Use of a different type of CD Key may fail to work.

--
Doug Knox, MS-MVP Windows Media Center\Windows Powered Smart Display\Security
Win 95/98/Me/XP Tweaks and Fixes
http://www.dougknox.com
--------------------------------
Per user Group Policy Restrictions for XP Home and XP Pro
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm
--------------------------------
Please reply only to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
Unsolicited e-mail is not answered.

"Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:DtHhe.413596$R24.375124@fe05!news.easynews.com...
>I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences between
> the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the standard are.
> Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small number of
> hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
>
> Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
> reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
> etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
> basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
> input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system? Or
> is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running an OEM
> version of windows xp?
>
> Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I appreciate
> it.
>
> Matt
>
>

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:28 PM
Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:
> Alias has given you some incorrect information.
>
> OEM versions will not perform an upgrade install, only clean
> installations. Retail versions, full or upgrade, will upgrade an
> existing installation (98 or higher).
>
> OEM versions are not entitled to any free support from Microsoft,
> other than what might be offered for Service Pack installs and the
> like.
>
> As far as using your CD's to create slipstreamed discs, this may not
> work. There are files that are included in the Setup that tell it
> whether its OEM, VLK or Retail. Use of a different type of CD Key
> may fail to work.

There are no slipstreaming problems with generic OEM CDs, and even with
OEM CDs modified by an OEM, most, if not all, slipstreaming problems can
be overcome by simply deletely the files they have add to the OEM CD
image.


--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Carey Frisch [MVP]
07-09-2005, 11:28 PM
Limitations of OEM versions of Windows XP:

-- cannot upgrade over an existing Windows installation.
-- must be installed "clean" on a freshly reformatted drive or partition.
-- cannot be transferred to a different computer in the future.
-- the license cannot be sold or transferred to another user.
-- are not eligible for free Microsoft technical support.
-- must be purchased with some type of computer hardware.
-- any problems whatsoever with the installation CD or Product Key.
is not eligible for Microsoft support....you have to deal with the "seller".
-- cannot be installed using a "retail version" Product Key.
-- cost less than "retail versions" due to the above limitations/risks.

Should you purchase an OEM license version of XP?
http://www.tek-tips.com/faqs.cfm?fid=4004

Other than the above noted exceptions, an OEM version of Windows XP
does not operationally differ from a "retail version".

--
Carey Frisch
Microsoft MVP
Windows XP - Shell/User
Microsoft Newsgroups

Get Windows XP Service Pack 2 with Advanced Security Technologies:
http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/windowsxp/choose.mspx

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Matt Buxton" wrote:

| I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences between
| the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the standard are.
| Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small number of
| hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
|
| Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
| reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
| etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
| basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
| input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system? Or
| is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running an OEM
| version of windows xp?
|
| Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I appreciate
| it.
|
| Matt



---
avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
Virus Database (VPS): 0519-2, 05/12/2005
Tested on: 5/15/2005 8:49:39 AM
avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2005 ALWIL Software.
http://www.avast.com

Bruce Chambers
07-09-2005, 11:28 PM
Matt Buxton wrote:
> I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences between
> the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the standard are.
> Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small number of
> hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
>


If you're dealing with a BIOS-locked (a.k.a., SLP) OEM CD or Recovery
CD, it'll be bound to the motherboard. I've even seen some reports (but
haven't personally encountered) that some manufacturer's Recovery CDs
will balk even if only the RAM or hard drive has been changed. However,
there are no upgrade limitations to a generic OEM installation CD.

There are some very important reasons that an OEM license costs so
much less than a retail license. OEM licenses are very limited:

1) OEM versions must be sold with a piece of non-peripheral
hardware (normally a motherboard or hard drive, if not an entire PC,
although Microsoft has greatly relaxed the hardware criteria for WinXP)
and are _permanently_ bound to the first PC on which they are installed.
An OEM license, once installed, is not legally transferable to another
computer under any circumstances. This is the main reason some people
avoid OEM versions; if the PC dies or is otherwise disposed of (even
stolen), you cannot re-use your OEM license on a new PC. The only
legitimate way to transfer the ownership of an OEM license is to
transfer ownership of the entire PC.

2) Microsoft provides no free support for OEM versions. If you
have any problems that require outside assistance, your only recourse is
to contact the manufacturer/builder of the PC or the vendor of the OEM
license. This would include such issues as lost a Product Key or
replacing damaged installation media. (Microsoft does make allowances
for those instances when you can prove that the OEM has gone out of
business.) This doesn't mean that you can't download patches and
service packs from Microsoft -- just no free telephone or email support
for problems with the OS.

3) An OEM CD cannot be used to perform an upgrade of an earlier
OS, as it was designed to be installed _only_ upon an empty hard drive.
It can still be used to perform a repair installation (a.k.a. an
in-place upgrade) of an existing WinXP installation.

4) If the OEM CD was designed by a specific manufacturer, such as
eMachines, Sony, Dell, Gateway, etc., it will most likely only install
on the same brand of PC, as an additional anti-piracy feature. Further,
such CDs are severely customized to contain only the minimum of device
drivers, and a lot of extra nonsense, that the manufacturer feels
necessary for the specific model of PC for which the CD was designed.
(To be honest, such CDs should _not_ be available on the open market;
but, if you're shopping someplace on-line like eBay, swap meets, or
computer fairs, there's often no telling what you're buying until it's
too late.) The "generic" OEM CDs, such as are manufactured by Microsoft
and sold to small systems builders, don't have this particular problem,
though, and are pretty much the same as their retail counterparts, apart
from the licensing, support, and upgrading restrictions.



> Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
> reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
> etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
> basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
> input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system? Or
> is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running an OEM
> version of windows xp?
>


This plan won't work, unless each of your customers has the same type
of license as you do.

Product Keys are bound to the specific type and language of
CD/license (OEM, Volume, retail, full, or Upgrade) with which they are
purchased. For example, a WinXP Home OEM Product Key won't work for any
retail version of WinXP Home, or for any version of WinXP Pro, and vice
versa. An upgrade's Product Key cannot be used with a full version CD,
and vice versa. An OEM Product Key will not work to install a retail
product. An Italian Product Key will not work with an English CD. Bottom
line: Product Keys and CD types cannot be mixed & matched.


--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
both at once. - RAH

Bruce Chambers
07-09-2005, 11:28 PM
Alias wrote:
> "Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:DtHhe.413596$R24.375124@fe05!news.easynews.com...
>
>>I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences between
>>the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the standard are.
>>Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small number of
>>hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
>
>
> No, the only real difference is the price, despite all the FUD other posters
> may try to lay on you.
>

That's not necessarily true, depending upon the specific type of CD
involved. You might try acquainting yourself with the facts, rather
than immediately spouting your irrelevant anti-Microsoft, anti-licensing
drivel.


>>Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
>>reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
>>etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
>>basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
>>input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system? Or
>>is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running an
>>OEM version of windows xp?
>
>
> Yes.
>


That's an outright lie and a technical impossibility. Products Keys
and license types can't be mixed & matched.



--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
both at once. - RAH

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
"Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
news:e7AjyTVWFHA.2124@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Limitations of OEM versions of Windows XP:
>
> -- cannot upgrade over an existing Windows installation.

Clean installs are better.

> -- must be installed "clean" on a freshly reformatted drive or partition.

The way it should be installed.

> -- cannot be transferred to a different computer in the future.

Horsepucky.

> -- the license cannot be sold or transferred to another user.

More horsepucky.

> -- are not eligible for free Microsoft technical support.

Who cares?

> -- must be purchased with some type of computer hardware.

More horsepucky. I have bought three without any hardware.

> -- any problems whatsoever with the installation CD or Product Key.
> is not eligible for Microsoft support....you have to deal with the
> "seller".

So? Know your seller.

> -- cannot be installed using a "retail version" Product Key.

So what?

> -- cost less than "retail versions" due to the above limitations/risks.

No, costs A LOT less.
>
> Should you purchase an OEM license version of XP?
> http://www.tek-tips.com/faqs.cfm?fid=4004

Yes.
>
> Other than the above noted exceptions, an OEM version of Windows XP
> does not operationally differ from a "retail version".

*snigger*

Alias
>
> --
> Carey Frisch
> Microsoft MVP
> Windows XP - Shell/User
> Microsoft Newsgroups
>
> Get Windows XP Service Pack 2 with Advanced Security Technologies:
> http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/windowsxp/choose.mspx
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> "Matt Buxton" wrote:
>
> | I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences
> between
> | the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the standard
> are.
> | Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small number of
> | hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
> |
> | Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
> | reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
> | etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
> | basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
> | input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system?
> Or
> | is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running an
> OEM
> | version of windows xp?
> |
> | Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I
> appreciate
> | it.
> |
> | Matt
>
>
>
> ---
> avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
> Virus Database (VPS): 0519-2, 05/12/2005
> Tested on: 5/15/2005 8:49:39 AM
> avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2005 ALWIL Software.
> http://www.avast.com
>
>
>

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
"Bruce Chambers" <bchambers@h0tmail.c0m> wrote in message
news:%23BYFqtVWFHA.612@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Alias wrote:
>> "Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
>> news:DtHhe.413596$R24.375124@fe05!news.easynews.com...
>>
>>>I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences
>>>between the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the
>>>standard are. Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small
>>>number of hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
>>
>>
>> No, the only real difference is the price, despite all the FUD other
>> posters may try to lay on you.
>>
>
> That's not necessarily true, depending upon the specific type of CD
> involved. You might try acquainting yourself with the facts, rather than
> immediately spouting your irrelevant anti-Microsoft, anti-licensing
> drivel.

I meant a generic OEM. Sorry. I will be sure to put "generic" in from now
on.

Alias
>
>
>>>Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
>>>reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
>>>etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
>>>basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
>>>input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system?
>>>Or is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running
>>>an OEM version of windows xp?
>>
>>
>> Yes.
>>
>
>
> That's an outright lie and a technical impossibility. Products Keys and
> license types can't be mixed & matched.
>
>
>
> --
>
> Bruce Chambers
>
> Help us help you:
> http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
> http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
>
> You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
> both at once. - RAH

Bruce Chambers
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Alias wrote:
> "Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
> news:e7AjyTVWFHA.2124@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>
>>Limitations of OEM versions of Windows XP:
>>
>>-- cannot upgrade over an existing Windows installation.
>
>
> Clean installs are better.
>
>


Horsepuckey, yourself. Please provide independent technical
documentation to support this assertion.

WinXP is designed to install and upgrade the existing operating
system while simultaneously preserving the applications and data, and
translating as many personalized settings as possible. The process is
designed to be, and normally is, quite painless. That said, things
can go wrong, in a small number of cases.

People claiming that a clean installation is always better than an
upgrade are living in the past, and might be basing their recommendation
on their experiences with older operating systems. one would probably
save a lot of time by upgrading the PC to WinXP, rather than performing
a clean installation, if there are no hardware or software
incompatibilities. Microsoft has greatly improved (over earlier versions
of Windows) WinXP's ability to smoothly upgrade an earlier OS.


--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
both at once. - RAH

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
"Bruce Chambers" <bchambers@h0tmail.c0m> wrote in message
news:uj81Y8VWFHA.3320@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Alias wrote:
>> "Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:e7AjyTVWFHA.2124@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>
>>>Limitations of OEM versions of Windows XP:
>>>
>>>-- cannot upgrade over an existing Windows installation.
>>
>>
>> Clean installs are better.
>>
>>
>
>
> Horsepuckey, yourself. Please provide independent technical documentation
> to support this assertion.

Check out the spyware/malware/virus reports on different programs to remove
them. None are 100%. So, you upgrade, SP 2 goes haywire and what do you have
to do??? Clean install.
>
> WinXP is designed to install and upgrade the existing operating
> system while simultaneously preserving the applications and data, and
> translating as many personalized settings as possible. The process is
> designed to be, and normally is, quite painless. That said, things
> can go wrong, in a small number of cases.

Only if the machine is clean. See above.
>
> People claiming that a clean installation is always better than an
> upgrade are living in the past, and might be basing their recommendation
> on their experiences with older operating systems. one would probably
> save a lot of time by upgrading the PC to WinXP, rather than performing a
> clean installation, if there are no hardware or software
> incompatibilities. Microsoft has greatly improved (over earlier versions
> of Windows) WinXP's ability to smoothly upgrade an earlier OS.
>
>
> --
>
> Bruce Chambers

See above. Clean install = for sure no problems.

Upgrade = Roll the dice and possible waste a lot of time to come to the
conclusion that you should have clean installed.

Alias

Leythos
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
In article <uj81Y8VWFHA.3320@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl>,
bchambers@h0tmail.c0m says...
> WinXP is designed to install and upgrade the existing operating
> system while simultaneously preserving the applications and data, and
> translating as many personalized settings as possible. The process is
> designed to be, and normally is, quite painless. That said, things
> can go wrong, in a small number of cases.

Bruce, I hate to disagree, but an OS is best installed from scratch on
ANY platform. The only time you install as an upgrade is when you have
no means to backup the information you want to keep.

I've seen to many instances were an XP upgrade over the old OS didn't
leave the system stable, but when wiped and installed from scratch, it
worked perfectly on the same system.

Many times it's quicker to do a fresh install than dealing with the
"issues" presented over the next couple days of an upgrade.

--
--
spam999free@rrohio.com
remove 999 in order to email me

Kerry Brown
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
"Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:DtHhe.413596$R24.375124@fe05!news.easynews.com...
>I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences between
>the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the standard are.
>Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small number of
>hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
>
> Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
> reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
> etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
> basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
> input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system? Or
> is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running an
> OEM version of windows xp?
>
> Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I appreciate
> it.
>
> Matt
>

Matt

You've received many different conflicting answers. If you are looking to
repair computers I'll tell you my experience. You will need a slipstreamed
CD for each version Home and Pro, OEM, retail, VLK. MSDN, ActionPack, etc.
That's a lot of CD's but each version will not accept a key from a different
version. This is a licensing issue but it must be worked around if you are
working on computers with all the different versions.

Operationally, once the OS is installed, the only differences are between
Home and Pro.

Kerry

Bruce Chambers
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Leythos wrote:

>
>
> Bruce, I hate to disagree, but an OS is best installed from scratch on
> ANY platform. The only time you install as an upgrade is when you have
> no means to backup the information you want to keep.
>

We've obviously had different experiences. But I can't agree that a
clean install is *ALWAYS* and categorically the better choice. There
are times when a clean install is preferable, and times when it's just a
waste of time. Circumstances vary.


> I've seen to many instances were an XP upgrade over the old OS didn't
> leave the system stable, but when wiped and installed from scratch, it
> worked perfectly on the same system.
>


I've seen the same thing, when the upgrade is performed on top of a
problematic OS, with incompatible applications installed, if there's
malware present, or if the hardware isn't fully compatible. What I have
not seen are any problems with upgrades performed on compatible hardware
with a properly maintained earlier OS.


> Many times it's quicker to do a fresh install than dealing with the
> "issues" presented over the next couple days of an upgrade.
>

Yes, sometimes time is a factor in the decision process.


--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
both at once. - RAH

Steve N.
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
kurttrail wrote:

> Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:
>
>>Alias has given you some incorrect information.
>>
>>OEM versions will not perform an upgrade install, only clean
>>installations. Retail versions, full or upgrade, will upgrade an
>>existing installation (98 or higher).
>>
>>OEM versions are not entitled to any free support from Microsoft,
>>other than what might be offered for Service Pack installs and the
>>like.
>>
>>As far as using your CD's to create slipstreamed discs, this may not
>>work. There are files that are included in the Setup that tell it
>>whether its OEM, VLK or Retail. Use of a different type of CD Key
>>may fail to work.
>
>
> There are no slipstreaming problems with generic OEM CDs, and even with
> OEM CDs modified by an OEM, most, if not all, slipstreaming problems can
> be overcome by simply deletely the files they have add to the OEM CD
> image.
>
>

Isn't all that's required are the i386 folder & contents from the CD and
the SP source?

Steve

Alias
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
"Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
news:MPG.1cf1326499dff07a989762@news-server.columbus.rr.com...
> In article <uj81Y8VWFHA.3320@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl>,
> bchambers@h0tmail.c0m says...
>> WinXP is designed to install and upgrade the existing operating
>> system while simultaneously preserving the applications and data, and
>> translating as many personalized settings as possible. The process is
>> designed to be, and normally is, quite painless. That said, things
>> can go wrong, in a small number of cases.
>
> Bruce, I hate to disagree, but an OS is best installed from scratch on
> ANY platform. The only time you install as an upgrade is when you have
> no means to backup the information you want to keep.
>
> I've seen to many instances were an XP upgrade over the old OS didn't
> leave the system stable, but when wiped and installed from scratch, it
> worked perfectly on the same system.
>
> Many times it's quicker to do a fresh install than dealing with the
> "issues" presented over the next couple days of an upgrade.

Will wonders never cease! Leythos and I actually agree on something.

Alias

Steve N.
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Carey Frisch [MVP] wrote:

> Limitations of OEM versions of Windows XP:
>
> -- cannot upgrade over an existing Windows installation.
> -- must be installed "clean" on a freshly reformatted drive or partition.
> -- cannot be transferred to a different computer in the future.
> -- the license cannot be sold or transferred to another user.

Sure it can if the other user buys the computer including the OS.

> -- are not eligible for free Microsoft technical support.
> -- must be purchased with some type of computer hardware.
> -- any problems whatsoever with the installation CD or Product Key.
> is not eligible for Microsoft support....you have to deal with the "seller".

The word "Seller" does not appear anywhere in the EULA.

"This End-User
License Agreement ("EULA") is a legal agreement between you
(either an individual or a single legal entity) and the
manufacturer ("Manufacturer") of the computer system or
computer system component ("HARDWARE") with which you acquired
the Microsoft software product(s) identified on the
Certificate of Authenticity ("COA") affixed to the HARDWARE or
on the associated product documentation ("SOFTWARE")."

Buy a copy of XP OEM Pro or Home with a Microsoft mouse from Wal-Mart,
the EULA is between you and MS since MS is the manufacturer of the
hardware it was purchased with.

Steve

> -- cannot be installed using a "retail version" Product Key.
> -- cost less than "retail versions" due to the above limitations/risks.
>
> Should you purchase an OEM license version of XP?
> http://www.tek-tips.com/faqs.cfm?fid=4004
>
> Other than the above noted exceptions, an OEM version of Windows XP
> does not operationally differ from a "retail version".
>

Leythos
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
In article <O81NpdWWFHA.2520@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl>, aka@[notme]
maskedandanonymous.org says...
> > Bruce, I hate to disagree, but an OS is best installed from scratch on
> > ANY platform. The only time you install as an upgrade is when you have
> > no means to backup the information you want to keep.
> >
> > I've seen to many instances were an XP upgrade over the old OS didn't
> > leave the system stable, but when wiped and installed from scratch, it
> > worked perfectly on the same system.
> >
> > Many times it's quicker to do a fresh install than dealing with the
> > "issues" presented over the next couple days of an upgrade.
>
> Will wonders never cease! Leythos and I actually agree on something.

In your case Alias, you and I seem to, for the most part, only disagree
on Politics and Licensing.

--
--
spam999free@rrohio.com
remove 999 in order to email me

Steve N.
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Alias wrote:

> "Bruce Chambers" <bchambers@h0tmail.c0m> wrote in message
> news:uj81Y8VWFHA.3320@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>
>>Alias wrote:
>>
>>>"Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
>>>news:e7AjyTVWFHA.2124@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>>
>>>
>>>>Limitations of OEM versions of Windows XP:
>>>>
>>>>-- cannot upgrade over an existing Windows installation.
>>>
>>>
>>>Clean installs are better.
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>Horsepuckey, yourself. Please provide independent technical documentation
>>to support this assertion.
>
>
> Check out the spyware/malware/virus reports on different programs to remove
> them. None are 100%. So, you upgrade, SP 2 goes haywire and what do you have
> to do??? Clean install.
>
>> WinXP is designed to install and upgrade the existing operating
>>system while simultaneously preserving the applications and data, and
>>translating as many personalized settings as possible. The process is
>>designed to be, and normally is, quite painless. That said, things
>>can go wrong, in a small number of cases.
>
>
> Only if the machine is clean. See above.
>
>> People claiming that a clean installation is always better than an
>>upgrade are living in the past, and might be basing their recommendation
>>on their experiences with older operating systems. one would probably
>>save a lot of time by upgrading the PC to WinXP, rather than performing a
>>clean installation, if there are no hardware or software
>>incompatibilities. Microsoft has greatly improved (over earlier versions
>>of Windows) WinXP's ability to smoothly upgrade an earlier OS.
>>
>>
>>--
>>
>>Bruce Chambers
>
>
> See above. Clean install = for sure no problems.
>
> Upgrade = Roll the dice and possible waste a lot of time to come to the
> conclusion that you should have clean installed.
>
> Alias
>
>

Not to mention file system problems that can only be corrected by a new
partition and format.

Steve

Doug Knox MS-MVP
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
There is a file SETUPP.INI that contains the information that is used to calculate the PID. This is tied to the CD Key used. OEM CD's won't take retail keys, and vice-versa.

--
Doug Knox, MS-MVP Windows Media Center\Windows Powered Smart Display\Security
Win 95/98/Me/XP Tweaks and Fixes
http://www.dougknox.com
--------------------------------
Per user Group Policy Restrictions for XP Home and XP Pro
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm
--------------------------------
Please reply only to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
Unsolicited e-mail is not answered.

"Steve N." <me@here.now> wrote in message news:JcKhe.909$X92.777@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> kurttrail wrote:
>
>> Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:
>>
>>>Alias has given you some incorrect information.
>>>
>>>OEM versions will not perform an upgrade install, only clean
>>>installations. Retail versions, full or upgrade, will upgrade an
>>>existing installation (98 or higher).
>>>
>>>OEM versions are not entitled to any free support from Microsoft,
>>>other than what might be offered for Service Pack installs and the
>>>like.
>>>
>>>As far as using your CD's to create slipstreamed discs, this may not
>>>work. There are files that are included in the Setup that tell it
>>>whether its OEM, VLK or Retail. Use of a different type of CD Key
>>>may fail to work.
>>
>>
>> There are no slipstreaming problems with generic OEM CDs, and even with
>> OEM CDs modified by an OEM, most, if not all, slipstreaming problems can
>> be overcome by simply deletely the files they have add to the OEM CD
>> image.
>>
>>
>
> Isn't all that's required are the i386 folder & contents from the CD and
> the SP source?
>
> Steve
>

Doug Knox MS-MVP
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
I wasn't implying that there was a problem with slipstreaming. I was saying that retail discs may not work with OEM keys, and vice versa.

--
Doug Knox, MS-MVP Windows Media Center\Windows Powered Smart Display\Security
Win 95/98/Me/XP Tweaks and Fixes
http://www.dougknox.com
--------------------------------
Per user Group Policy Restrictions for XP Home and XP Pro
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm
--------------------------------
Please reply only to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
Unsolicited e-mail is not answered.

"kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in message news:%23DLw2JVWFHA.4076@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:
>> Alias has given you some incorrect information.
>>
>> OEM versions will not perform an upgrade install, only clean
>> installations. Retail versions, full or upgrade, will upgrade an
>> existing installation (98 or higher).
>>
>> OEM versions are not entitled to any free support from Microsoft,
>> other than what might be offered for Service Pack installs and the
>> like.
>>
>> As far as using your CD's to create slipstreamed discs, this may not
>> work. There are files that are included in the Setup that tell it
>> whether its OEM, VLK or Retail. Use of a different type of CD Key
>> may fail to work.
>
> There are no slipstreaming problems with generic OEM CDs, and even with
> OEM CDs modified by an OEM, most, if not all, slipstreaming problems can
> be overcome by simply deletely the files they have add to the OEM CD
> image.
>
>
> --
> Peace!
> Kurt
> Self-anointed Moderator
> microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
> http://microscum.com/mscommunity
> "Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
> "Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"
>
>

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Steve N. wrote:
> kurttrail wrote:
>
>> Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:
>>
>>> Alias has given you some incorrect information.
>>>
>>> OEM versions will not perform an upgrade install, only clean
>>> installations. Retail versions, full or upgrade, will upgrade an
>>> existing installation (98 or higher).
>>>
>>> OEM versions are not entitled to any free support from Microsoft,
>>> other than what might be offered for Service Pack installs and the
>>> like.
>>>
>>> As far as using your CD's to create slipstreamed discs, this may not
>>> work. There are files that are included in the Setup that tell it
>>> whether its OEM, VLK or Retail. Use of a different type of CD Key
>>> may fail to work.
>>
>>
>> There are no slipstreaming problems with generic OEM CDs, and even
>> with OEM CDs modified by an OEM, most, if not all, slipstreaming
>> problems can be overcome by simply deletely the files they have add
>> to the OEM CD image.
>>
>>
>
> Isn't all that's required are the i386 folder & contents from the CD
> and the SP source?
>
> Steve

Some OEMs hide files in the i386 folder so you have to figure out which
ones.

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:
> I wasn't implying that there was a problem with slipstreaming. I was
> saying that retail discs may not work with OEM keys, and vice versa.

"As far as using your CD's to create slipstreamed discs, this may not
work."



>
>
> "kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in
> message news:%23DLw2JVWFHA.4076@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:
>>> Alias has given you some incorrect information.
>>>
>>> OEM versions will not perform an upgrade install, only clean
>>> installations. Retail versions, full or upgrade, will upgrade an
>>> existing installation (98 or higher).
>>>
>>> OEM versions are not entitled to any free support from Microsoft,
>>> other than what might be offered for Service Pack installs and the
>>> like.
>>>
>>> As far as using your CD's to create slipstreamed discs, this may not
>>> work. There are files that are included in the Setup that tell it
>>> whether its OEM, VLK or Retail. Use of a different type of CD Key
>>> may fail to work.
>>
>> There are no slipstreaming problems with generic OEM CDs, and even
>> with OEM CDs modified by an OEM, most, if not all, slipstreaming
>> problems can be overcome by simply deletely the files they have add
>> to the OEM CD image.
>>
>>
>> --
>> Peace!
>> Kurt
>> Self-anointed Moderator
>> microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
>> http://microscum.com/mscommunity
>> "Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
>> "Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"



--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Steve N.
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:

> There is a file SETUPP.INI that contains the information that is used
> to calculate the PID. This is tied to the CD Key used. OEM CD's
> won't take retail keys, and vice-versa.
>


Thanks Doug, but that doesn't really answer my question. I'm not asking
about PID keys but what sources are required for slipstreaming.

Steve

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Leythos wrote:
> In article <O81NpdWWFHA.2520@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl>, aka@[notme]
> maskedandanonymous.org says...
>>> Bruce, I hate to disagree, but an OS is best installed from scratch
>>> on ANY platform. The only time you install as an upgrade is when
>>> you have no means to backup the information you want to keep.
>>>
>>> I've seen to many instances were an XP upgrade over the old OS
>>> didn't leave the system stable, but when wiped and installed from
>>> scratch, it worked perfectly on the same system.
>>>
>>> Many times it's quicker to do a fresh install than dealing with the
>>> "issues" presented over the next couple days of an upgrade.
>>
>> Will wonders never cease! Leythos and I actually agree on something.
>
> In your case Alias, you and I seem to, for the most part, only
> disagree on Politics and Licensing.

"You just made me realize something that I should have seen a long time
ago - spending any time in a thread with Alias or Kurt is counter-
productive to why I participate in these groups." - "Re: Anyone willing
to lie about their children, can never be trusted!" Sunday, May 15, 2005
11:08 AM

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Doug Knox MS-MVP
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
I know what I wrote.

--
Doug Knox, MS-MVP Windows Media Center\Windows Powered Smart Display\Security
Win 95/98/Me/XP Tweaks and Fixes
http://www.dougknox.com
--------------------------------
Per user Group Policy Restrictions for XP Home and XP Pro
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm
--------------------------------
Please reply only to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
Unsolicited e-mail is not answered.

"kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in message news:e$7a5pWWFHA.2256@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:
>> I wasn't implying that there was a problem with slipstreaming. I was
>> saying that retail discs may not work with OEM keys, and vice versa.
>
> "As far as using your CD's to create slipstreamed discs, this may not
> work."
>
>
>
>>
>>
>> "kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in
>> message news:%23DLw2JVWFHA.4076@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>>> Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:
>>>> Alias has given you some incorrect information.
>>>>
>>>> OEM versions will not perform an upgrade install, only clean
>>>> installations. Retail versions, full or upgrade, will upgrade an
>>>> existing installation (98 or higher).
>>>>
>>>> OEM versions are not entitled to any free support from Microsoft,
>>>> other than what might be offered for Service Pack installs and the
>>>> like.
>>>>
>>>> As far as using your CD's to create slipstreamed discs, this may not
>>>> work. There are files that are included in the Setup that tell it
>>>> whether its OEM, VLK or Retail. Use of a different type of CD Key
>>>> may fail to work.
>>>
>>> There are no slipstreaming problems with generic OEM CDs, and even
>>> with OEM CDs modified by an OEM, most, if not all, slipstreaming
>>> problems can be overcome by simply deletely the files they have add
>>> to the OEM CD image.
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Peace!
>>> Kurt
>>> Self-anointed Moderator
>>> microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
>>> http://microscum.com/mscommunity
>>> "Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
>>> "Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"
>
>
>
> --
> Peace!
> Kurt
> Self-anointed Moderator
> microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
> http://microscum.com/mscommunity
> "Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
> "Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"
>
>

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:
> I know what I wrote.
>

But you don't seem to see that it could be read that there may be
problems with slipstreaming.

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Matt Buxton
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Thank you to everyone for thier input. I never imagined this thread would
start off such a long debate. While we all have our opinions on Microsoft
policy, I am only interested in the facts and staying legal. I will go with
the advice in this post to be on the safe side. In fact, for most OEM`s
(Like DELL) I think the best course would be to create a totally new disk
with the customer/friends own OEM bundled recovery disk. Might take a bit
longer but will save time in the long run doing the unatended setup and
having all the patches in place and ready.

Which still leaves the problem, what if your customer/friend has lost their
Windows XP setup disk? I suppose a new copy is the only option then.

"Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
news:exjEWNWWFHA.1592@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> "Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:DtHhe.413596$R24.375124@fe05!news.easynews.com...
>>I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences
>>between the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the
>>standard are. Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small
>>number of hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
>>
>> Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
>> reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
>> etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
>> basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
>> input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system?
>> Or is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running
>> an OEM version of windows xp?
>>
>> Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I
>> appreciate it.
>>
>> Matt
>>
>
> Matt
>
> You've received many different conflicting answers. If you are looking to
> repair computers I'll tell you my experience. You will need a slipstreamed
> CD for each version Home and Pro, OEM, retail, VLK. MSDN, ActionPack, etc.
> That's a lot of CD's but each version will not accept a key from a
> different version. This is a licensing issue but it must be worked around
> if you are working on computers with all the different versions.
>
> Operationally, once the OS is installed, the only differences are between
> Home and Pro.
>
> Kerry
>
>

Steve N.
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Matt Buxton wrote:

> Thank you to everyone for thier input. I never imagined this thread would
> start off such a long debate.

It _always_ does because some people here can't seem to comprehend the
written word. Unfortunately some of those same people are in a position
of being considered authoritative by default.

> While we all have our opinions on Microsoft
> policy, I am only interested in the facts and staying legal. I will go with
> the advice in this post to be on the safe side. In fact, for most OEM`s
> (Like DELL) I think the best course would be to create a totally new disk
> with the customer/friends own OEM bundled recovery disk. Might take a bit
> longer but will save time in the long run doing the unatended setup and
> having all the patches in place and ready.
>
> Which still leaves the problem, what if your customer/friend has lost their
> Windows XP setup disk? I suppose a new copy is the only option then.

Nope. There is nothing wrong with "borrowing" the appropriate
installation media (i.e. one that works), it is not the source media
itself but the license that is the clincher, if they have a license to
use the software who gives a rip where the software is installed from?
Of course your customer/friend could jump through the hoops to replace
lost or missing CDs, but why bother? The end result is the same and
there is no license violation issue in doing so that I can see, and even
if there *might* be one, who's gonna know unless you tell them? And how
could anyone tell that an install CD was copied from a friend or made
from a recovery-partition-make-install-CD routine?

According to MS we have bought the LICENSE to use the software, not the
software code itself, so what does it matter HOW we obtain the code or
what media it is installed from? If we've paid for a LICENSE to use it
then just USE it. For example, we can legally install Windows or other
MS products from a network location or we can restore an OS from any
number of backup facilities available.

Don't make your friends/customers pay for something again that they
already have paid for; i.e. the LICENSE to USE the SOFTWARE in question.

Sure, it can be confusing at times, but it ain't rocket surgery.

Steve

>
> "Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
> news:exjEWNWWFHA.1592@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>
>>"Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
>>news:DtHhe.413596$R24.375124@fe05!news.easynews.com...
>>
>>>I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences
>>>between the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the
>>>standard are. Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small
>>>number of hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
>>>
>>>Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
>>>reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
>>>etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
>>>basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
>>>input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system?
>>>Or is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running
>>>an OEM version of windows xp?
>>>
>>>Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I
>>>appreciate it.
>>>
>>>Matt
>>>
>>
>>Matt
>>
>>You've received many different conflicting answers. If you are looking to
>>repair computers I'll tell you my experience. You will need a slipstreamed
>>CD for each version Home and Pro, OEM, retail, VLK. MSDN, ActionPack, etc.
>>That's a lot of CD's but each version will not accept a key from a
>>different version. This is a licensing issue but it must be worked around
>>if you are working on computers with all the different versions.
>>
>>Operationally, once the OS is installed, the only differences are between
>>Home and Pro.
>>
>>Kerry
>>
>>
>
>
>

Kerry Brown
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
"Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:gCLhe.109092$7i2.31089@fe03.news.easynews.com...
> Thank you to everyone for thier input. I never imagined this thread would
> start off such a long debate. While we all have our opinions on Microsoft
> policy, I am only interested in the facts and staying legal. I will go
> with the advice in this post to be on the safe side. In fact, for most
> OEM`s (Like DELL) I think the best course would be to create a totally new
> disk with the customer/friends own OEM bundled recovery disk. Might take a
> bit longer but will save time in the long run doing the unatended setup
> and having all the patches in place and ready.
>
> Which still leaves the problem, what if your customer/friend has lost
> their Windows XP setup disk? I suppose a new copy is the only option then.
>

I've been able to get by with 5 CD's slipstreamed with the latest updates,
retail Home and Pro, OEM Home and Pro, and VLK Pro. I haven't personally run
across a OEM version that the key wouldn't work with a generic OEM install
disk for repair installs. If you are doing a clean install many OEMs use a
set of restore CD/DVDs or a hidden partiton to return the computer to the
factory settings. If they want all the programs that the computer came with
there is no alternative but to use the OEM restore method. If they have lost
the CD/DVDs or deleted the partition you will have to contact the OEM. If
you use the customer's key my belief is you are within the terms of the
EULA. The source media is irrelevant. It's when you start changing keys that
most people think you are doing something wrong.

Kerry

> "Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
> news:exjEWNWWFHA.1592@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> "Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
>> news:DtHhe.413596$R24.375124@fe05!news.easynews.com...
>>>I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences
>>>between the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the
>>>standard are. Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small
>>>number of hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
>>>
>>> Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
>>> reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
>>> etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
>>> basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
>>> input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system?
>>> Or is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running
>>> an OEM version of windows xp?
>>>
>>> Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I
>>> appreciate it.
>>>
>>> Matt
>>>
>>
>> Matt
>>
>> You've received many different conflicting answers. If you are looking to
>> repair computers I'll tell you my experience. You will need a
>> slipstreamed CD for each version Home and Pro, OEM, retail, VLK. MSDN,
>> ActionPack, etc. That's a lot of CD's but each version will not accept a
>> key from a different version. This is a licensing issue but it must be
>> worked around if you are working on computers with all the different
>> versions.
>>
>> Operationally, once the OS is installed, the only differences are between
>> Home and Pro.
>>
>> Kerry
>>
>>
>
>

Matt Buxton
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Many thanks for your help and advice. I have encountered this hidden
partition business before, but I think the last DELL machine I delt with was
just a plain copy of XP Home OEM.

"Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
news:OFQvruXWFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> "Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:gCLhe.109092$7i2.31089@fe03.news.easynews.com...
>> Thank you to everyone for thier input. I never imagined this thread would
>> start off such a long debate. While we all have our opinions on Microsoft
>> policy, I am only interested in the facts and staying legal. I will go
>> with the advice in this post to be on the safe side. In fact, for most
>> OEM`s (Like DELL) I think the best course would be to create a totally
>> new disk with the customer/friends own OEM bundled recovery disk. Might
>> take a bit longer but will save time in the long run doing the unatended
>> setup and having all the patches in place and ready.
>>
>> Which still leaves the problem, what if your customer/friend has lost
>> their Windows XP setup disk? I suppose a new copy is the only option
>> then.
>>
>
> I've been able to get by with 5 CD's slipstreamed with the latest updates,
> retail Home and Pro, OEM Home and Pro, and VLK Pro. I haven't personally
> run across a OEM version that the key wouldn't work with a generic OEM
> install disk for repair installs. If you are doing a clean install many
> OEMs use a set of restore CD/DVDs or a hidden partiton to return the
> computer to the factory settings. If they want all the programs that the
> computer came with there is no alternative but to use the OEM restore
> method. If they have lost the CD/DVDs or deleted the partition you will
> have to contact the OEM. If you use the customer's key my belief is you
> are within the terms of the EULA. The source media is irrelevant. It's
> when you start changing keys that most people think you are doing
> something wrong.
>
> Kerry
>
>> "Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
>> news:exjEWNWWFHA.1592@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>> "Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
>>> news:DtHhe.413596$R24.375124@fe05!news.easynews.com...
>>>>I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences
>>>>between the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the
>>>>standard are. Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a
>>>>small number of hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
>>>>
>>>> Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
>>>> reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot
>>>> fixes etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional
>>>> for the basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that
>>>> then just input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the
>>>> operating system? Or is it only OK to do that in cases where the
>>>> individual is not running an OEM version of windows xp?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I
>>>> appreciate it.
>>>>
>>>> Matt
>>>>
>>>
>>> Matt
>>>
>>> You've received many different conflicting answers. If you are looking
>>> to repair computers I'll tell you my experience. You will need a
>>> slipstreamed CD for each version Home and Pro, OEM, retail, VLK. MSDN,
>>> ActionPack, etc. That's a lot of CD's but each version will not accept a
>>> key from a different version. This is a licensing issue but it must be
>>> worked around if you are working on computers with all the different
>>> versions.
>>>
>>> Operationally, once the OS is installed, the only differences are
>>> between Home and Pro.
>>>
>>> Kerry
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>

Kerry Brown
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
"Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:7lNhe.421407$R24.260870@fe05!news.easynews.com...
> Many thanks for your help and advice. I have encountered this hidden
> partition business before, but I think the last DELL machine I delt with
> was just a plain copy of XP Home OEM.
>

Your welcome, good luck.

Kerry

> "Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
> news:OFQvruXWFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> "Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
>> news:gCLhe.109092$7i2.31089@fe03.news.easynews.com...
>>> Thank you to everyone for thier input. I never imagined this thread
>>> would start off such a long debate. While we all have our opinions on
>>> Microsoft policy, I am only interested in the facts and staying legal. I
>>> will go with the advice in this post to be on the safe side. In fact,
>>> for most OEM`s (Like DELL) I think the best course would be to create a
>>> totally new disk with the customer/friends own OEM bundled recovery
>>> disk. Might take a bit longer but will save time in the long run doing
>>> the unatended setup and having all the patches in place and ready.
>>>
>>> Which still leaves the problem, what if your customer/friend has lost
>>> their Windows XP setup disk? I suppose a new copy is the only option
>>> then.
>>>
>>
>> I've been able to get by with 5 CD's slipstreamed with the latest
>> updates, retail Home and Pro, OEM Home and Pro, and VLK Pro. I haven't
>> personally run across a OEM version that the key wouldn't work with a
>> generic OEM install disk for repair installs. If you are doing a clean
>> install many OEMs use a set of restore CD/DVDs or a hidden partiton to
>> return the computer to the factory settings. If they want all the
>> programs that the computer came with there is no alternative but to use
>> the OEM restore method. If they have lost the CD/DVDs or deleted the
>> partition you will have to contact the OEM. If you use the customer's key
>> my belief is you are within the terms of the EULA. The source media is
>> irrelevant. It's when you start changing keys that most people think you
>> are doing something wrong.
>>
>> Kerry
>>
>>> "Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
>>> news:exjEWNWWFHA.1592@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>>> "Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
>>>> news:DtHhe.413596$R24.375124@fe05!news.easynews.com...
>>>>>I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences
>>>>>between the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the
>>>>>standard are. Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a
>>>>>small number of hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
>>>>>
>>>>> Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
>>>>> reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot
>>>>> fixes etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional
>>>>> for the basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that
>>>>> then just input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the
>>>>> operating system? Or is it only OK to do that in cases where the
>>>>> individual is not running an OEM version of windows xp?
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I
>>>>> appreciate it.
>>>>>
>>>>> Matt
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Matt
>>>>
>>>> You've received many different conflicting answers. If you are looking
>>>> to repair computers I'll tell you my experience. You will need a
>>>> slipstreamed CD for each version Home and Pro, OEM, retail, VLK. MSDN,
>>>> ActionPack, etc. That's a lot of CD's but each version will not accept
>>>> a key from a different version. This is a licensing issue but it must
>>>> be worked around if you are working on computers with all the different
>>>> versions.
>>>>
>>>> Operationally, once the OS is installed, the only differences are
>>>> between Home and Pro.
>>>>
>>>> Kerry
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>

Doug Knox MS-MVP
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
And I clarified what I meant, in response to your answer. I even said that I didn't mean to imply that slipstreaming may not work.

--
Doug Knox, MS-MVP Windows Media Center\Windows Powered Smart Display\Security
Win 95/98/Me/XP Tweaks and Fixes
http://www.dougknox.com
--------------------------------
Per user Group Policy Restrictions for XP Home and XP Pro
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm
--------------------------------
Please reply only to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
Unsolicited e-mail is not answered.

"kurttrail" <dontemailme@anywhereintheknowuniverse.org> wrote in message news:udUsRAXWFHA.132@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:
>> I know what I wrote.
>>
>
> But you don't seem to see that it could be read that there may be
> problems with slipstreaming.
>
> --
> Peace!
> Kurt
> Self-anointed Moderator
> microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
> http://microscum.com/mscommunity
> "Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
> "Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"
>
>

kurttrail
07-09-2005, 11:29 PM
Doug Knox MS-MVP wrote:
> And I clarified what I meant, in response to your answer. I even
> said that I didn't mean to imply that slipstreaming may not work.

And that's when I quoted you to show WHY it seemed like you did.

Now that we've come full circle, would you like to go around again?

I think you're being way too defensive, Doug. I wasn't making any
accusation. Just trying to clear things up.

--
Peace!
Kurt
Self-anointed Moderator
microscum.pubic.windowsexp.gonorrhea
http://microscum.com/mscommunity
"Trustworthy Computing" is only another example of an Oxymoron!
"Produkt-Aktivierung macht frei"

Winux P
07-09-2005, 11:30 PM
Doug, in relation to OEM, Retail CD keys, especially licensing, and the
difference between OEM and Retail editions. I have two (yes legit) copies of
WinXP Pro. One retail the other OEM, I installed my retail version on two
PCs. On the second PC I was able to activate winxp pro over the phone with
out any trouble on the basis I had another licence, even though it was an
OEM, and this was told and hence known to the PA person. Reading here the
differences between the versions, mainly technical, I would like to know
specifically in terms of licensing. This is the issue I have as now I see
the main difference is pricing. Microsoft effectively sold me a retail
version at the price of an OEM. Or what do I have? A retail copy won't take
an OEM key, am I restricted by OEM licensing on this copy? Do I have a
retail copy on my second PC? Is it an OEM?

This is what I'd like answered to the numerous questions that appear in the
group regarding differences between OEM and retail editions. Not necessarily
upgrades, not transferable clauses, one PC only rules,... in the situations
where the following may happen between an end user and Microsoft Product
Activation;

End User: I've just build three new PCs and bought a copy of OEM Win XP Pro
SP1a for each of them, I can't install windows on any of the PCs, The
installation bombs out just after the "Install Windows on the selected
partition screen". I've had to install the retail version on the PC to get
them working and now I need them activated.

PA: Are the disks damaged?
End User: No, I though that and took them back to the store, they checked
the disks and came up OK.

PA: What hardware did you buy?
End User: All XP compatible hardware. I really need these computers
activated, Or support to get the OEMs installed. (Didn't know at the time
OEM where the distributors' responsibility and wasn't told that by MS PA,
now thanks to you guys I do know)

PA: Can you wait a few minutes sir.
End User: Sure!

PA: OK Sir, on the basis you have purchased licences for Windows XP Pro I
will activate these copies for you. Are you in front of one of the computers
at the moment.

End User: Yes...

Very similar to my situation, conversation was allot more involved though.
So when these questions come up Doug I think price does play a big part as
now I'm thinking MS is way over charging for retail versions. If licence is
causing this price difference then why not simplify the licence and make it
all cheaper? There would be no difference between OEM and retail I think,
and I'm actually thinking now there's not. In your opinion shall I throw
away my OEM disk keeping the licence for it, and just install the retail
copy and activate similar to the above way? Am I a pirate? ..Na! I think
this is the basis of a lot of fuss on this issue that goes on in this
newsgroup i.e. "OEM and Standard windows - What are the differences?" Apart
from the obvious.

-Winux P.

"Doug Knox MS-MVP" <dknox@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:%23JnSy9UWFHA.3716@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Alias has given you some incorrect information.

OEM versions will not perform an upgrade install, only clean installations.
Retail versions, full or upgrade, will upgrade an existing installation (98
or higher).

OEM versions are not entitled to any free support from Microsoft, other than
what might be offered for Service Pack installs and the like.

As far as using your CD's to create slipstreamed discs, this may not work.
There are files that are included in the Setup that tell it whether its OEM,
VLK or Retail. Use of a different type of CD Key may fail to work.

--
Doug Knox, MS-MVP Windows Media Center\Windows Powered Smart
Display\Security
Win 95/98/Me/XP Tweaks and Fixes
http://www.dougknox.com
--------------------------------
Per user Group Policy Restrictions for XP Home and XP Pro
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm
--------------------------------
Please reply only to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
Unsolicited e-mail is not answered.

"Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:DtHhe.413596$R24.375124@fe05!news.easynews.com...
>I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences between
> the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the standard are.
> Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small number of
> hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
>
> Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
> reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
> etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
> basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
> input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system? Or
> is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running an
> OEM
> version of windows xp?
>
> Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I appreciate
> it.
>
> Matt
>
>

Doug Knox MS-MVP
07-09-2005, 11:31 PM
I don't get into the interpretation issues of the EULA.

--
Doug Knox, MS-MVP Windows Media Center\Windows Powered Smart Display\Security
Win 95/98/Me/XP Tweaks and Fixes
http://www.dougknox.com
--------------------------------
Per user Group Policy Restrictions for XP Home and XP Pro
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm
--------------------------------
Please reply only to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
Unsolicited e-mail is not answered.

"Winux P" <winuxp@msnews.grp> wrote in message news:ueVGIgfWFHA.1152@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>
> Doug, in relation to OEM, Retail CD keys, especially licensing, and the
> difference between OEM and Retail editions. I have two (yes legit) copies of
> WinXP Pro. One retail the other OEM, I installed my retail version on two
> PCs. On the second PC I was able to activate winxp pro over the phone with
> out any trouble on the basis I had another licence, even though it was an
> OEM, and this was told and hence known to the PA person. Reading here the
> differences between the versions, mainly technical, I would like to know
> specifically in terms of licensing. This is the issue I have as now I see
> the main difference is pricing. Microsoft effectively sold me a retail
> version at the price of an OEM. Or what do I have? A retail copy won't take
> an OEM key, am I restricted by OEM licensing on this copy? Do I have a
> retail copy on my second PC? Is it an OEM?
>
> This is what I'd like answered to the numerous questions that appear in the
> group regarding differences between OEM and retail editions. Not necessarily
> upgrades, not transferable clauses, one PC only rules,... in the situations
> where the following may happen between an end user and Microsoft Product
> Activation;
>
> End User: I've just build three new PCs and bought a copy of OEM Win XP Pro
> SP1a for each of them, I can't install windows on any of the PCs, The
> installation bombs out just after the "Install Windows on the selected
> partition screen". I've had to install the retail version on the PC to get
> them working and now I need them activated.
>
> PA: Are the disks damaged?
> End User: No, I though that and took them back to the store, they checked
> the disks and came up OK.
>
> PA: What hardware did you buy?
> End User: All XP compatible hardware. I really need these computers
> activated, Or support to get the OEMs installed. (Didn't know at the time
> OEM where the distributors' responsibility and wasn't told that by MS PA,
> now thanks to you guys I do know)
>
> PA: Can you wait a few minutes sir.
> End User: Sure!
>
> PA: OK Sir, on the basis you have purchased licences for Windows XP Pro I
> will activate these copies for you. Are you in front of one of the computers
> at the moment.
>
> End User: Yes...
>
> Very similar to my situation, conversation was allot more involved though.
> So when these questions come up Doug I think price does play a big part as
> now I'm thinking MS is way over charging for retail versions. If licence is
> causing this price difference then why not simplify the licence and make it
> all cheaper? There would be no difference between OEM and retail I think,
> and I'm actually thinking now there's not. In your opinion shall I throw
> away my OEM disk keeping the licence for it, and just install the retail
> copy and activate similar to the above way? Am I a pirate? ..Na! I think
> this is the basis of a lot of fuss on this issue that goes on in this
> newsgroup i.e. "OEM and Standard windows - What are the differences?" Apart
> from the obvious.
>
> -Winux P.
>
> "Doug Knox MS-MVP" <dknox@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:%23JnSy9UWFHA.3716@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Alias has given you some incorrect information.
>
> OEM versions will not perform an upgrade install, only clean installations.
> Retail versions, full or upgrade, will upgrade an existing installation (98
> or higher).
>
> OEM versions are not entitled to any free support from Microsoft, other than
> what might be offered for Service Pack installs and the like.
>
> As far as using your CD's to create slipstreamed discs, this may not work.
> There are files that are included in the Setup that tell it whether its OEM,
> VLK or Retail. Use of a different type of CD Key may fail to work.
>
> --
> Doug Knox, MS-MVP Windows Media Center\Windows Powered Smart
> Display\Security
> Win 95/98/Me/XP Tweaks and Fixes
> http://www.dougknox.com
> --------------------------------
> Per user Group Policy Restrictions for XP Home and XP Pro
> http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_securityconsole.htm
> --------------------------------
> Please reply only to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
> Unsolicited e-mail is not answered.
>
> "Matt Buxton" <nospampleaseimbritish@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:DtHhe.413596$R24.375124@fe05!news.easynews.com...
>>I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the actual differences between
>> the OEM versions of Windows XP home and Professional and the standard are.
>> Somebody told me that the OEM version only supports a small number of
>> hardware upgrades etc, any truth in this?
>>
>> Furthermore, I was considering creating an unattended setup disk to
>> reinstall peoples computers with, slipstreamed with the latest hot fixes
>> etc. If I use my personal copies of XP Home and XP Professional for the
>> basis of such a disk, is it enough to create a disk like that then just
>> input each persons unique XP key, then reactivate the operating system? Or
>> is it only OK to do that in cases where the individual is not running an
>> OEM
>> version of windows xp?
>>
>> Thanks in advance, this group has been very helpful to me and I appreciate
>> it.
>>
>> Matt
>>
>>
>
>


OEM and Standard windows - What are the differences?