Use of the term 'resident'



belp
07-10-2005, 12:26 AM
What does the term 'resident' mean in the following contexts?

"My resident Anti-virus is AVG Free." and "My resident anti-spyware
is WinPatrol."

belp

Dell8300
xp home sp2

Jupiter Jones [MVP]
07-10-2005, 12:26 AM
You are stating that is what is installed on the computer.
WinPatrol and AVG Free reside (are installed) on your computer.

--
Jupiter Jones [MVP]
http://www3.telus.net/dandemar
In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol
http://www.dts-l.org


"belp" <belp@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:1B789880-C8BF-48F0-9876-920A79952CFF@microsoft.com...
> What does the term 'resident' mean in the following contexts?
>
> "My resident Anti-virus is AVG Free." and "My resident
> anti-spyware
> is WinPatrol."
>
> belp
>
> Dell8300
> xp home sp2

T. Waters
07-10-2005, 12:26 AM
belp wrote:
> What does the term 'resident' mean in the following contexts?
>
> "My resident Anti-virus is AVG Free." and "My resident
> anti-spyware is WinPatrol."
>
> belp
>
> Dell8300
> xp home sp2

Resident = "residing on your hard drive" = installed

Art®
07-10-2005, 12:26 AM
Sometime back in the days of DOS there were programs that were referred to
as TSR's. That stood for "terminate stay resident". That meant that the
program would run some code which would terminate, but that it would leave
part of the program resident in memory. If I remember correctly, "Sidekick"
was an example of a TSR. The part of the program that was resident could be
called up with a hotkey combination, such as Alt M for the main menu, Atl N
for the notepad, Alt C for the calculator, etc.

Regarding anti-virus and anti-spyware programs, it could mean that part of
the program actually stays resident in memory so it can monitor the files
that are being accessed on your computer for viruses and spyware.

Art

"belp" <belp@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:1B789880-C8BF-48F0-9876-920A79952CFF@microsoft.com...
> What does the term 'resident' mean in the following contexts?
>
> "My resident Anti-virus is AVG Free." and "My resident
> anti-spyware
> is WinPatrol."
>
> belp
>
> Dell8300
> xp home sp2

belp
07-10-2005, 12:26 AM
"Art®", is there a remote chance that an AV program or an anti-spyware
program has call back hotkey combos? belp

"Art®" wrote:

> Sometime back in the days of DOS there were programs that were referred to
> as TSR's. That stood for "terminate stay resident". That meant that the
> program would run some code which would terminate, but that it would leave
> part of the program resident in memory. If I remember correctly, "Sidekick"
> was an example of a TSR. The part of the program that was resident could be
> called up with a hotkey combination, such as Alt M for the main menu, Atl N
> for the notepad, Alt C for the calculator, etc.
>
> Regarding anti-virus and anti-spyware programs, it could mean that part of
> the program actually stays resident in memory so it can monitor the files
> that are being accessed on your computer for viruses and spyware.
>
> Art
>
> "belp" <belp@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:1B789880-C8BF-48F0-9876-920A79952CFF@microsoft.com...
> > What does the term 'resident' mean in the following contexts?
> >
> > "My resident Anti-virus is AVG Free." and "My resident
> > anti-spyware
> > is WinPatrol."
> >
> > belp
> >
> > Dell8300
> > xp home sp2
>
>
>

Art®
07-10-2005, 12:27 AM
By default, AVG includes the following hotkey combinations:
However, the program must be up and running for them to work.

Program


Export List to File
Ctrl+S

Print
Ctrl+P

View


Reduced Mode
F3

Standard Mode
F4

Refresh
F5

Service


Program Settings
F8

Rescue Disk
Ctrl+F8

Check for Updates
F9

Language Selection
Ctrl+L

Information


About AVG Free
Alt+Shift+F10

Contacts
Alt+F10



Art

"belp" <belp@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:91D59AF7-80FE-49C0-B90D-2060817E487B@microsoft.com...
> "Art®", is there a remote chance that an AV program or an anti-spyware
> program has call back hotkey combos? belp
>
> "Art®" wrote:
>
>> Sometime back in the days of DOS there were programs that were referred
>> to
>> as TSR's. That stood for "terminate stay resident". That meant that the
>> program would run some code which would terminate, but that it would
>> leave
>> part of the program resident in memory. If I remember correctly,
>> "Sidekick"
>> was an example of a TSR. The part of the program that was resident could
>> be
>> called up with a hotkey combination, such as Alt M for the main menu, Atl
>> N
>> for the notepad, Alt C for the calculator, etc.
>>
>> Regarding anti-virus and anti-spyware programs, it could mean that part
>> of
>> the program actually stays resident in memory so it can monitor the files
>> that are being accessed on your computer for viruses and spyware.
>>
>> Art
>>
>> "belp" <belp@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:1B789880-C8BF-48F0-9876-920A79952CFF@microsoft.com...
>> > What does the term 'resident' mean in the following contexts?
>> >
>> > "My resident Anti-virus is AVG Free." and "My resident
>> > anti-spyware
>> > is WinPatrol."
>> >
>> > belp
>> >
>> > Dell8300
>> > xp home sp2
>>
>>
>>


Use of the term 'resident'