Static IP Address



Deon
07-10-2005, 12:21 AM
Hi there,

Win XP Prof with SP2 and all updates.

As part of an answer from someone, I got this.

--
Also, when choosing a Static IP address, be certain the address will NOT
conflict with the router's DHCP server address range.

Some routers will fail to forward ports correctly if the computer's IP
address falls within the router's DHCP server address range.
--

How do I go about to do this? Your help will be very welcome.

--
Regards,
Deon Holtzhausen

Ron Martell
07-10-2005, 12:21 AM
Deon <REMOVEdeon@REMOVEsincro.co.za> wrote:

>Hi there,
>
>Win XP Prof with SP2 and all updates.
>
>As part of an answer from someone, I got this.
>
>--
> Also, when choosing a Static IP address, be certain the address will NOT
>conflict with the router's DHCP server address range.
>
>Some routers will fail to forward ports correctly if the computer's IP
>address falls within the router's DHCP server address range.
>--
>
>How do I go about to do this? Your help will be very welcome.

Go into your routers configuration utility and check the settings.
One of the entries will show the range of addresses used by DHCP
Usually this range is for 100 addresses. but it can vary.

To access the configuration utility for most routers you use a web
browser and go to the i.p. address used by the router. Some routers,
such as the now-discontinued Microsoft models, have a special
configuration utility that is installed on the computer.

Let us assume, for illustration purposes, that your router uses
192.168.000.001 for itself (very common) and that the DHCP service in
the router uses the range 192.168.000.100 to 192.168.000.199 for
assignments.

For the purposes of assigning a static i.p. in the above scenario you
would choose one in the range 192.168.000.002 to 192.168.000.099 or in
the range 192.168.000.200 to 192.168.000.255

Hope this clarifies the situation.

Good luck


Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
--
Microsoft MVP
On-Line Help Computer Service
http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

In memory of a dear friend Alex Nichol MVP
http://aumha.org/alex.htm

Deon
07-10-2005, 12:21 AM
Ron Martell <ron.martell@gmail.com> wrote in
news:kc638195sjombeml7o0chs0vcichtbgkb8@4ax.com:

> Deon <REMOVEdeon@REMOVEsincro.co.za> wrote:
>
>>Hi there,
>>
>>Win XP Prof with SP2 and all updates.
>>
>>As part of an answer from someone, I got this.
>>
>>--
>> Also, when choosing a Static IP address, be certain the address will
>> NOT
>>conflict with the router's DHCP server address range.
>>
>>Some routers will fail to forward ports correctly if the computer's IP
>>address falls within the router's DHCP server address range.
>>--
>>
>>How do I go about to do this? Your help will be very welcome.
>
> Go into your routers configuration utility and check the settings.
> One of the entries will show the range of addresses used by DHCP
> Usually this range is for 100 addresses. but it can vary.
>
> To access the configuration utility for most routers you use a web
> browser and go to the i.p. address used by the router. Some routers,
> such as the now-discontinued Microsoft models, have a special
> configuration utility that is installed on the computer.
>
> Let us assume, for illustration purposes, that your router uses
> 192.168.000.001 for itself (very common) and that the DHCP service in
> the router uses the range 192.168.000.100 to 192.168.000.199 for
> assignments.
>
> For the purposes of assigning a static i.p. in the above scenario you
> would choose one in the range 192.168.000.002 to 192.168.000.099 or in
> the range 192.168.000.200 to 192.168.000.255
>
> Hope this clarifies the situation.
>
> Good luck
>
>
> Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada

Ron,
thanx very much for a VERY thorough explanation. My router, a Netgear
DG834GT, IP is 192.168.0.1
If I understand correctly, the PC's static address must be without the
range of the router.

Do I have to set anything on my PC to assign the static IP to it?

Thanx again!

Deon


--
Regards,

Deon H

JS
07-10-2005, 12:21 AM
Ron Martell wrote:
> Deon <REMOVEdeon@REMOVEsincro.co.za> wrote:
>
>
>>Hi there,
>>
>>Win XP Prof with SP2 and all updates.
>>
>>As part of an answer from someone, I got this.
>>
>>--
>>Also, when choosing a Static IP address, be certain the address will NOT
>>conflict with the router's DHCP server address range.
>>
>>Some routers will fail to forward ports correctly if the computer's IP
>>address falls within the router's DHCP server address range.
>>--
>>
>>How do I go about to do this? Your help will be very welcome.
>
>
> Go into your routers configuration utility and check the settings.
> One of the entries will show the range of addresses used by DHCP
> Usually this range is for 100 addresses. but it can vary.
>
> To access the configuration utility for most routers you use a web
> browser and go to the i.p. address used by the router. Some routers,
> such as the now-discontinued Microsoft models, have a special
> configuration utility that is installed on the computer.
>
> Let us assume, for illustration purposes, that your router uses
> 192.168.000.001 for itself (very common) and that the DHCP service in
> the router uses the range 192.168.000.100 to 192.168.000.199 for
> assignments.
>
> For the purposes of assigning a static i.p. in the above scenario you
> would choose one in the range 192.168.000.002 to 192.168.000.099 or in
> the range 192.168.000.200 to 192.168.000.255
>
> Hope this clarifies the situation.
>
> Good luck
>
>
> Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada

Hi Ron

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought you weren't supposed to assign
xxx.xxx.xxx.255 to a host in a class C network because xxx.xxx.xxx.255
is the broadcast address?

Also, can you clarify something: is assigning an IP address outside the
DHCP server's range an absolute rule or does it depend on the DHCP
server being used? (I ask because without knowing any of this, I once
assigned static IPs within my router's DHCP server's range and I never
had any problems. Was I just lucky or did the DHCP server adjust itself
accordingly?)

Rick \Nutcase\ Rogers
07-10-2005, 12:21 AM
Hi Deon,

Just an added note: Most of that NetGear line will allow you to assign an IP
to any connected machine via MAC address. You will find this option in the
advanced settings. Rather than tinker with the individual machine's network
settings, you can use this feature of the router to automatically assign a
chosen static IP address to any of the connected systems.

--
Best of Luck,

Rick Rogers, aka "Nutcase" - Microsoft MVP
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/
Associate Expert - WindowsXP Expert Zone
www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
Windows help - www.rickrogers.org

"Deon" <REMOVEdeon@REMOVEsincro.co.za> wrote in message
news:Xns9653605B57F99REMOVEdeonREMOVEsinc@196.25.240.158...
> Ron Martell <ron.martell@gmail.com> wrote in
> news:kc638195sjombeml7o0chs0vcichtbgkb8@4ax.com:
>
>> Deon <REMOVEdeon@REMOVEsincro.co.za> wrote:
>>
>>>Hi there,
>>>
>>>Win XP Prof with SP2 and all updates.
>>>
>>>As part of an answer from someone, I got this.
>>>
>>>--
>>> Also, when choosing a Static IP address, be certain the address will
>>> NOT
>>>conflict with the router's DHCP server address range.
>>>
>>>Some routers will fail to forward ports correctly if the computer's IP
>>>address falls within the router's DHCP server address range.
>>>--
>>>
>>>How do I go about to do this? Your help will be very welcome.
>>
>> Go into your routers configuration utility and check the settings.
>> One of the entries will show the range of addresses used by DHCP
>> Usually this range is for 100 addresses. but it can vary.
>>
>> To access the configuration utility for most routers you use a web
>> browser and go to the i.p. address used by the router. Some routers,
>> such as the now-discontinued Microsoft models, have a special
>> configuration utility that is installed on the computer.
>>
>> Let us assume, for illustration purposes, that your router uses
>> 192.168.000.001 for itself (very common) and that the DHCP service in
>> the router uses the range 192.168.000.100 to 192.168.000.199 for
>> assignments.
>>
>> For the purposes of assigning a static i.p. in the above scenario you
>> would choose one in the range 192.168.000.002 to 192.168.000.099 or in
>> the range 192.168.000.200 to 192.168.000.255
>>
>> Hope this clarifies the situation.
>>
>> Good luck
>>
>>
>> Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
>
> Ron,
> thanx very much for a VERY thorough explanation. My router, a Netgear
> DG834GT, IP is 192.168.0.1
> If I understand correctly, the PC's static address must be without the
> range of the router.
>
> Do I have to set anything on my PC to assign the static IP to it?
>
> Thanx again!
>
> Deon
>
>
> --
> Regards,
>
> Deon H

bumtracks
07-10-2005, 12:21 AM
> Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought you weren't supposed to assign
> xxx.xxx.xxx.255 to a host in a class C network because xxx.xxx.xxx.255 is
> the broadcast address?
it wont let you use 255

> Also, can you clarify something: is assigning an IP address outside the
> DHCP server's range an absolute rule or does it depend on the DHCP server
> being used? (I ask because without knowing any of this, I once assigned
> static IPs within my router's DHCP server's range and I never had any
> problems. Was I just lucky or did the DHCP server adjust itself
> accordingly?)
some computers or their nic's will go crazy when set static & the router
tried to refresh the lease,
some routers actualyl wait or look for ack that lease renew was successful
or keep trying.
Consumer grade stuff they knooow its not going to be managed correctly so I
bed they actually leave out all the good features on purpose.


Static IP Address