Windows XP Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)



Weyde_one
07-10-2005, 12:12 AM
When using XP ICS, my understanding is that the ICS workstation is suppose to
act as a DHCP sever to provide the remote workstations with IP address,
subnet mask, and default gateway information.

I have a small workgroup in which one workstation uses dial-up for
connection to the Internet. I configured ICS on this workstation and used a
static IP address and subnet mask and configured the other workgroup computer
to obtain addressing information dynamically. Why is the IP address obtained
dynamically by the "remote workstation" a random IP address and subnet mask.
The dynamically-obtained IP address is is not even within the same network
(or IP address class) as the ICS workstation?

Can anyone explain this?

Thanks,
----
weyde_one

Sharon F
07-10-2005, 12:12 AM
On Wed, 15 Jun 2005 09:51:05 -0700, Weyde_one wrote:

> When using XP ICS, my understanding is that the ICS workstation is suppose to
> act as a DHCP sever to provide the remote workstations with IP address,
> subnet mask, and default gateway information.
>
> I have a small workgroup in which one workstation uses dial-up for
> connection to the Internet. I configured ICS on this workstation and used a
> static IP address and subnet mask and configured the other workgroup computer
> to obtain addressing information dynamically. Why is the IP address obtained
> dynamically by the "remote workstation" a random IP address and subnet mask.
> The dynamically-obtained IP address is is not even within the same network
> (or IP address class) as the ICS workstation?
>
> Can anyone explain this?
>
> Thanks,
> ----
> weyde_one

I believe ICS is hard coded to use a specific IP on the "host" computer:
192.168.0.1

How to Configure a Static Client for Windows XP Internet Connection Sharing
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;309642
--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User

Weyde_one
07-10-2005, 12:12 AM
Sharon F:

Thanks for the tip. I read at least two versions of instructions for
configuring ICS. Each set of instructions specifies that the "client"
workstation(s) should be configured to obtain an IP addres and DNS server
address automatically.

On the first day I setup ICS, I initially configured both the ICS "host"
and the client to obtain an IP addresses automatically. This configuration
did not work well, as the "client" was assigned a random IP address that was
out of the valid range of the ICS"host". I subsequently configured the
static IP address 192.168.0.1 and a mask of 255.255.255.0 on the "host'" and
left the "client" configured to receive its information automatically. This
configuration allowed the workstations to work well together, sharing the
Internet connection as well as a local printer.

Today, after both workstations were restarted, the "client" workstation
again was assigned the random IP address and subnet mask. Now the ICS
workstation cannot communicate with the "client", nor can they share the
printer, or the Internet connection.

By the way, on the first day of connecting them, I did restart both
computers several times to verify that could share the Internet connection as
well as the local printer.

--
weyde_one


"Sharon F" wrote:

> On Wed, 15 Jun 2005 09:51:05 -0700, Weyde_one wrote:
>
> > When using XP ICS, my understanding is that the ICS workstation is suppose to
> > act as a DHCP sever to provide the remote workstations with IP address,
> > subnet mask, and default gateway information.
> >
> > I have a small workgroup in which one workstation uses dial-up for
> > connection to the Internet. I configured ICS on this workstation and used a
> > static IP address and subnet mask and configured the other workgroup computer
> > to obtain addressing information dynamically. Why is the IP address obtained
> > dynamically by the "remote workstation" a random IP address and subnet mask.
> > The dynamically-obtained IP address is is not even within the same network
> > (or IP address class) as the ICS workstation?
> >
> > Can anyone explain this?
> >
> > Thanks,
> > ----
> > weyde_one
>
> I believe ICS is hard coded to use a specific IP on the "host" computer:
> 192.168.0.1
>
> How to Configure a Static Client for Windows XP Internet Connection Sharing
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;309642
> --
> Sharon F
> MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
>

Sharon F
07-10-2005, 12:12 AM
On Wed, 15 Jun 2005 13:00:07 -0700, Weyde_one wrote:

> Thanks for the tip. I read at least two versions of instructions for
> configuring ICS. Each set of instructions specifies that the "client"
> workstation(s) should be configured to obtain an IP addres and DNS server
> address automatically.
>
> On the first day I setup ICS, I initially configured both the ICS "host"
> and the client to obtain an IP addresses automatically. This configuration
> did not work well, as the "client" was assigned a random IP address that was
> out of the valid range of the ICS"host". I subsequently configured the
> static IP address 192.168.0.1 and a mask of 255.255.255.0 on the "host'" and
> left the "client" configured to receive its information automatically. This
> configuration allowed the workstations to work well together, sharing the
> Internet connection as well as a local printer.
>
> Today, after both workstations were restarted, the "client" workstation
> again was assigned the random IP address and subnet mask. Now the ICS
> workstation cannot communicate with the "client", nor can they share the
> printer, or the Internet connection.
>
> By the way, on the first day of connecting them, I did restart both
> computers several times to verify that could share the Internet connection as
> well as the local printer.

The "host" computer has to be running for ICS to work. You'll see a 169.*
address when the client computer fails to obtain an IP number in the
correct range from the "host." This is an APIPA address or "public IP."
The cause of the failure can vary. Even if you have everything setup
correctly, the timing can be off a hair between the various systems when
the client is seeking its IP and there goes your dynamically assigned
address. You can restart the client system and hope it succeeds (sometimes
works since many processes remain in memory for a restart instead of
loading fresh). Or perform an ipconfig /release and /renew from a command
prompt window. Or, and probably the simplest, assign static IPs to the
"clients."

ICS is an optional part of a workgroup structure. Since you are sharing a
printer, is it possible that there are other resources that you want
shared? I'm thinking that you may want to delve a little deeper into
getting a workgroup setup (one that includes ICS).

If all machines in the workgroup run XP, the network wizard is handy and
effective. It supposedly works well with mixed networks but I find that
it's better to set those manually instead of using the wizard. There are
several articles in the Windows XP Expert Zone on setting up a home network
(including ICS): http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/default.mspx

I also find the home networking articles at www.practicallynetworked.com to
be helpful too.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User

Weyde_one
07-10-2005, 12:12 AM
Sharon:

Thanks for the helpful tips and the links. The workgroup is already setup
and was actually working fine. I have setup a few of those. This is my
first time using ICS; normally I use a router with built-in hub ports or a
switch/router combination so that all workstations connect to a common
gateway.


I was tempted to use a static IP address for the "client", but was not sure
if it would adversely effect the process.

Thanks again.

--
weyde_one


"Sharon F" wrote:

> On Wed, 15 Jun 2005 13:00:07 -0700, Weyde_one wrote:
>
> > Thanks for the tip. I read at least two versions of instructions for
> > configuring ICS. Each set of instructions specifies that the "client"
> > workstation(s) should be configured to obtain an IP addres and DNS server
> > address automatically.
> >
> > On the first day I setup ICS, I initially configured both the ICS "host"
> > and the client to obtain an IP addresses automatically. This configuration
> > did not work well, as the "client" was assigned a random IP address that was
> > out of the valid range of the ICS"host". I subsequently configured the
> > static IP address 192.168.0.1 and a mask of 255.255.255.0 on the "host'" and
> > left the "client" configured to receive its information automatically. This
> > configuration allowed the workstations to work well together, sharing the
> > Internet connection as well as a local printer.
> >
> > Today, after both workstations were restarted, the "client" workstation
> > again was assigned the random IP address and subnet mask. Now the ICS
> > workstation cannot communicate with the "client", nor can they share the
> > printer, or the Internet connection.
> >
> > By the way, on the first day of connecting them, I did restart both
> > computers several times to verify that could share the Internet connection as
> > well as the local printer.
>
> The "host" computer has to be running for ICS to work. You'll see a 169.*
> address when the client computer fails to obtain an IP number in the
> correct range from the "host." This is an APIPA address or "public IP."
> The cause of the failure can vary. Even if you have everything setup
> correctly, the timing can be off a hair between the various systems when
> the client is seeking its IP and there goes your dynamically assigned
> address. You can restart the client system and hope it succeeds (sometimes
> works since many processes remain in memory for a restart instead of
> loading fresh). Or perform an ipconfig /release and /renew from a command
> prompt window. Or, and probably the simplest, assign static IPs to the
> "clients."
>
> ICS is an optional part of a workgroup structure. Since you are sharing a
> printer, is it possible that there are other resources that you want
> shared? I'm thinking that you may want to delve a little deeper into
> getting a workgroup setup (one that includes ICS).
>
> If all machines in the workgroup run XP, the network wizard is handy and
> effective. It supposedly works well with mixed networks but I find that
> it's better to set those manually instead of using the wizard. There are
> several articles in the Windows XP Expert Zone on setting up a home network
> (including ICS): http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/default.mspx
>
> I also find the home networking articles at www.practicallynetworked.com to
> be helpful too.
>
> --
> Sharon F
> MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
>

Sharon F
07-10-2005, 12:12 AM
On Wed, 15 Jun 2005 14:02:04 -0700, Weyde_one wrote:

> Sharon:
>
> Thanks for the helpful tips and the links. The workgroup is already setup
> and was actually working fine. I have setup a few of those. This is my
> first time using ICS; normally I use a router with built-in hub ports or a
> switch/router combination so that all workstations connect to a common
> gateway.
>
>
> I was tempted to use a static IP address for the "client", but was not sure
> if it would adversely effect the process.
>
> Thanks again.

You're welcome and good luck with this!

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User


Windows XP Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)